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Independence Hall

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NEWS
January 17, 2003 | By Richard R. Beeman
Between 1776 and 1787, Pennsylvania's State House (later renamed Independence Hall) was the site of a series of discussions and decisions that would forever alter the course of history. Those discussions throw light on the current controversy over the city's decision to close Chestnut Street in front of Independence Hall. Central to the discussions surrounding the adoption of the Declaration of Independence and the creation of the U.S. Constitution was the age-old problem of finding the proper balance between communal security and personal liberty.
NEWS
April 16, 2005
For a fee, summer visitors to Independence National Historical Park will be able to take a new tour that treats them to a unique look at the city's past. It's not only a journey back to Philadelphia's colonial era, but also to more carefree days before 9/11. The dinner tour lets visitors stroll the colonnade of Independence Hall in the quiet of the evening, and then step inside for an after-hours look at the old statehouse. Not really a big deal? Well, such casual, low-key access to democracy's birthplace, in fact, is a remarkable departure.
NEWS
February 19, 2012 | By Laura Cofsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
At dusk on Saturday, the Centennial Bell that hangs in the Independence Hall tower chimed for the first time in 18 months, filling the air with a clear, crisp sound that will mark every hour of every day. About 100 bystanders gathered to watch the unveiling of the Philadelphia landmark. "Here we are in the figurative shadow of our founders," Cynthia MacLeod, superintendent of Independence National Historical Park, said as she welcomed the crowd. She described the history of Independence Hall, from the signing of the Declaration of Independence to the ratification of the Constitution.
NEWS
April 10, 1997 | by William Bunch, Daily News Staff Writer
First, there was that crack in the Liberty Bell. Now this: Independence Hall has been closed because of an asbestos problem. Officials say the shutdown, which should last for about a week, will not affect the Presidents' Summit on Volunteerism later this month, when President Clinton is slated to deliver the keynote address outside the city's most historic structure. But the asbestos dust that was discovered yesterday as a renovation crew worked on the adjacent Congress Hall was not good news for the biggest tourist attraction in a city that's marketing itself as a major vacation destination.
NEWS
October 15, 2010 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
The scaffolding is up, girdling the familiar tower of Independence Hall. A decorative scrim, donated by the Friends of Independence and sporting an image of the tower, will soon itself be girdling the scaffolding - a reminder of what lies within and a cover for unsightly construction. The much-needed 14-month renovation of the tower is well under way, and previously unknown facts are revealing themselves - maybe not earthshaking surprises, but surprises nonetheless. Example: For years, architectural stewards at Independence National Historical Park believed that the spindle holding up the tower's stylized pointed weathervane was constructed from two pieces of iron.
NEWS
October 3, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
As if the rainiest June in Philadelphia history and a federal "sequester" that cut 10 percent from national parks' budgets were not enough, the federal government shutdown now threatens to further disrupt businesses and tourism near the Liberty Bell and Independence Hall. Merchants in shops at the Bourse across from Independence National Historical Park said they didn't see any impact on the first day of the shutdown Tuesday, but a longer closure could seriously affect the 10,000 visitors per day who normally pass near their doors in October.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1992 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
Independence National Historical Park is in peril. That's from a report issued earlier this week by the National Parks and Conservation Association, a Washington-based nonprofit group. It listed examples from around the nation of looming threats and disasters at the nation's parks. Here's what the group found in Philadelphia: a sprinkler system at historic Independence Hall so outdated that a fire could level the building in fewer than 30 minutes, and antiquated plumbing that flooded the hall's basement three times last summer.
NEWS
January 14, 2012 | By Mike Newall and Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
A 2010 Temple University graduate was hospitalized in extremely critical condition after being beaten by three men near Independence Hall early Saturday morning, Philadelphia police said. The attack occurred about 2:30 a.m. as the 23-year-old man and two female friends were returning from the Lucy's Hat Shop bar blocks away on Market Street, investigators said. It was not clear exactly what sparked the incident. The victim apparently yelled at a taxi that failed to stop as the group hailed it in the 400 block of Chestnut Street, investigators said.
NEWS
September 13, 2007
Private security guards who have protested what they call poor working conditions at Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell voted yesterday to unionize. The Wackenhut Services Inc. workers voted, 31-2, to join the Service Employees International Union Local 32BJ, district organizing coordinator Jeff Hornstein said. Fifteen guards did not vote. The election was held at a community hall a few blocks from Independence National Historical Park, which is also protected by the National Park Service.
NEWS
September 29, 2013 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA The Philadelphia Fire Department was forced Friday to temporarily close a firehouse that serves the historic district around Independence Hall because a fire that started in a medic truck has damaged the brick structure. At 11:36 a.m., two emergency medical technicians reported a fire in their truck, parked in the garage of the firehouse at 101-15 N. Fourth St. Fire Commissioner Lloyd Ayers said other firehouses in Center City responded to the blaze, which was contained by 11:49 a.m. "Everyone is safe," he said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 18, 2016
Even after Philadelphia ceased being the nation's capital, U.S. presidents frequented the city and environs. As the Democratic National Convention draws near, let's trace the steps of previous Democratic presidents. Independence Hall - On July 4, 1962, President John F. Kennedy welcomed the dissent and difference of opinion encouraged by the American political system. However, he stressed - whatever the differences - "you and I . . . [must] recognize how dependent we both are, one upon the other, for the successful operation of our unique and happy form of government.
NEWS
July 7, 2016
By Mark Edward Lender Our country just marked the 240th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence with the customary parades, fireworks, and family gatherings that have become American traditions. As welcome as these celebrations are, we should take a few moments to reflect upon the fact that - just 50 miles from Independence Hall, where that momentous document was signed - a modern academic institution is destroying the battlefield where the declaration's lofty ideals were secured by our nation's first soldiers.
NEWS
July 5, 2016
By David Davenport and Gordon Lloyd When we celebrate the Fourth of July with a three-day weekend vacation, picnics, and fireworks, we sometimes forget the real meaning of the holiday. The quiz below provides an opportunity for you to test and refresh your civic knowledge of the landmark occasion in American history that we celebrate. 1. The Fourth of July commemorates what important historic occasion? a. The end of the Revolutionary War b. The signing of the Declaration of Independence c. Adoption of the Declaration of Independence by Congress d. The signing of the Constitution 2. In which city was the Declaration of Independence signed?
NEWS
July 5, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
The Philly Pops plucked the reliably resonant strings of patriotism Sunday night. How could it have been otherwise? Using Independence Hall as a heady backdrop, with an estimated 15,000 listeners stretched across the mall, the Pops were back for their annual sound track to Independence Day festivities. Conductor Michael Krajewski presided over a program of Americana very much like the ones of years past. Yet if something was different this time, that something was us. The political realm has become unrecognizable since our last musical gathering at this birthplace of a great idea for a nation, and it was hard to escape the thought that what kind of America you listened for had at least something to do with the America you see us becoming.
NEWS
July 5, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage, Staff Writer
Some news as Philadelphia prepares for its raucous, red, white, and blue observance of Independence Day: You're celebrating the wrong day, people! July the Fourth should be July the Second - the day the Continental Congress voted for independence. Or, at least, John Adams thought so. And he was there. The next day - July 3, 1776 - he wrote a three-page letter to his wife, Abigail, rhapsodizing that July 2 would become the most exalted day in American history. "I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated, by succeeding Generations, as the great anniversary Festival," Adams wrote.
TRAVEL
June 20, 2016
There are times when dad just wants to hang out and watch a game rather than being dragged to yet another "must-see" tourist site. But what if there were things that even a cantankerous father might be interested in visiting? Here are a few museums and attractions nearby that will get him off the sofa: Simeone Foundation Automotive Museum: Instead of watching an auto race on TV on Sunday, spend the afternoon at this hidden gem near the Philadelphia Airport. The museum owes its existence to the passion of one man, neurosurgeon Fred Simeone.
NEWS
June 17, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Staff Writer
The Museum of the American Revolution, whose building at Third and Chestnut Streets has been under construction for two years, plans to announce Thursday that it will open its doors to the public April 19, 2017 - the 242nd anniversary of the battles of Lexington and Concord, considered the opening of hostilities between Britain and its North American colonies. When the smoke cleared following those nasty Massachusetts skirmishes so long ago, 122 fighters on both sides had lost their lives, and the colonies were launched on a revolutionary road that would not reach the goal of independence for eight arduous years.
REAL_ESTATE
May 2, 2016 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
The 100-year-old Lenox building in Washington Square West is traditional, to say the least. Stately, you might say. You might also think the home of two young law professors there would be a bit stodgy. You'd need to think again. Step out onto the appropriate floor, walk down a floral-wallpapered hall and into Andrea Monroe and Craig Green's condominium. Your second impression proves the true one: Theirs is a contemporary take on design, with furnishings that are modern, newly configured spaces that have been updated to suit the couple's needs, and some walls painted a soft, tasteful orange.
NEWS
April 22, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage, Staff Writer
President Andrew Jackson, slaveholder and killer of Indians and Englishmen, please step to the back. Harriet Tubman, African American abolitionist and leader of the Underground Railroad, come up front. On Wednesday, the federal Treasury Department announced the switch that's coming to the $20 bill, with the nation's seventh president losing his spot - a change that brought reaction from political leaders, schoolchildren, academics, and numismatists in Philadelphia and elsewhere. "I can't think of a better choice for the $20 bill than Harriet Tubman," tweeted Hillary Clinton.
NEWS
November 10, 2015 | BY JOE BRANDT, Daily News Staff Writer brandtj@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
ROBERT SHEDRICK returned from Vietnam in 1972 shaken and confused. He doesn't like talking about a tour there with the Marines when he lost several of his comrades, or about how he became homeless in 1995, or how he later lost his legs years after drinking water polluted with dry-cleaning fluid and benzene at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina. "It was hell in Vietnam," Shedrick, 68, said yesterday across from Independence Hall, where he watched participants arrive at the end of Philly's first Veterans Day parade.
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