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Independence Hall

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NEWS
January 17, 2003 | By Richard R. Beeman
Between 1776 and 1787, Pennsylvania's State House (later renamed Independence Hall) was the site of a series of discussions and decisions that would forever alter the course of history. Those discussions throw light on the current controversy over the city's decision to close Chestnut Street in front of Independence Hall. Central to the discussions surrounding the adoption of the Declaration of Independence and the creation of the U.S. Constitution was the age-old problem of finding the proper balance between communal security and personal liberty.
NEWS
April 16, 2005
For a fee, summer visitors to Independence National Historical Park will be able to take a new tour that treats them to a unique look at the city's past. It's not only a journey back to Philadelphia's colonial era, but also to more carefree days before 9/11. The dinner tour lets visitors stroll the colonnade of Independence Hall in the quiet of the evening, and then step inside for an after-hours look at the old statehouse. Not really a big deal? Well, such casual, low-key access to democracy's birthplace, in fact, is a remarkable departure.
NEWS
February 19, 2012 | By Laura Cofsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
At dusk on Saturday, the Centennial Bell that hangs in the Independence Hall tower chimed for the first time in 18 months, filling the air with a clear, crisp sound that will mark every hour of every day. About 100 bystanders gathered to watch the unveiling of the Philadelphia landmark. "Here we are in the figurative shadow of our founders," Cynthia MacLeod, superintendent of Independence National Historical Park, said as she welcomed the crowd. She described the history of Independence Hall, from the signing of the Declaration of Independence to the ratification of the Constitution.
NEWS
April 10, 1997 | by William Bunch, Daily News Staff Writer
First, there was that crack in the Liberty Bell. Now this: Independence Hall has been closed because of an asbestos problem. Officials say the shutdown, which should last for about a week, will not affect the Presidents' Summit on Volunteerism later this month, when President Clinton is slated to deliver the keynote address outside the city's most historic structure. But the asbestos dust that was discovered yesterday as a renovation crew worked on the adjacent Congress Hall was not good news for the biggest tourist attraction in a city that's marketing itself as a major vacation destination.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1992 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
Independence National Historical Park is in peril. That's from a report issued earlier this week by the National Parks and Conservation Association, a Washington-based nonprofit group. It listed examples from around the nation of looming threats and disasters at the nation's parks. Here's what the group found in Philadelphia: a sprinkler system at historic Independence Hall so outdated that a fire could level the building in fewer than 30 minutes, and antiquated plumbing that flooded the hall's basement three times last summer.
NEWS
January 14, 2012 | By Mike Newall and Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
A 2010 Temple University graduate was hospitalized in extremely critical condition after being beaten by three men near Independence Hall early Saturday morning, Philadelphia police said. The attack occurred about 2:30 a.m. as the 23-year-old man and two female friends were returning from the Lucy's Hat Shop bar blocks away on Market Street, investigators said. It was not clear exactly what sparked the incident. The victim apparently yelled at a taxi that failed to stop as the group hailed it in the 400 block of Chestnut Street, investigators said.
NEWS
September 13, 2007
Private security guards who have protested what they call poor working conditions at Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell voted yesterday to unionize. The Wackenhut Services Inc. workers voted, 31-2, to join the Service Employees International Union Local 32BJ, district organizing coordinator Jeff Hornstein said. Fifteen guards did not vote. The election was held at a community hall a few blocks from Independence National Historical Park, which is also protected by the National Park Service.
NEWS
October 15, 2010 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
The scaffolding is up, girdling the familiar tower of Independence Hall. A decorative scrim, donated by the Friends of Independence and sporting an image of the tower, will soon itself be girdling the scaffolding - a reminder of what lies within and a cover for unsightly construction. The much-needed 14-month renovation of the tower is well under way, and previously unknown facts are revealing themselves - maybe not earthshaking surprises, but surprises nonetheless. Example: For years, architectural stewards at Independence National Historical Park believed that the spindle holding up the tower's stylized pointed weathervane was constructed from two pieces of iron.
NEWS
September 29, 2013 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA The Philadelphia Fire Department was forced Friday to temporarily close a firehouse that serves the historic district around Independence Hall because a fire that started in a medic truck has damaged the brick structure. At 11:36 a.m., two emergency medical technicians reported a fire in their truck, parked in the garage of the firehouse at 101-15 N. Fourth St. Fire Commissioner Lloyd Ayers said other firehouses in Center City responded to the blaze, which was contained by 11:49 a.m. "Everyone is safe," he said.
NEWS
October 3, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
As if the rainiest June in Philadelphia history and a federal "sequester" that cut 10 percent from national parks' budgets were not enough, the federal government shutdown now threatens to further disrupt businesses and tourism near the Liberty Bell and Independence Hall. Merchants in shops at the Bourse across from Independence National Historical Park said they didn't see any impact on the first day of the shutdown Tuesday, but a longer closure could seriously affect the 10,000 visitors per day who normally pass near their doors in October.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
REAL_ESTATE
May 2, 2016 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
The 100-year-old Lenox building in Washington Square West is traditional, to say the least. Stately, you might say. You might also think the home of two young law professors there would be a bit stodgy. You'd need to think again. Step out onto the appropriate floor, walk down a floral-wallpapered hall and into Andrea Monroe and Craig Green's condominium. Your second impression proves the true one: Theirs is a contemporary take on design, with furnishings that are modern, newly configured spaces that have been updated to suit the couple's needs, and some walls painted a soft, tasteful orange.
NEWS
April 22, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage, Staff Writer
President Andrew Jackson, slaveholder and killer of Indians and Englishmen, please step to the back. Harriet Tubman, African American abolitionist and leader of the Underground Railroad, come up front. On Wednesday, the federal Treasury Department announced the switch that's coming to the $20 bill, with the nation's seventh president losing his spot - a change that brought reaction from political leaders, schoolchildren, academics, and numismatists in Philadelphia and elsewhere. "I can't think of a better choice for the $20 bill than Harriet Tubman," tweeted Hillary Clinton.
NEWS
November 10, 2015 | BY JOE BRANDT, Daily News Staff Writer brandtj@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
ROBERT SHEDRICK returned from Vietnam in 1972 shaken and confused. He doesn't like talking about a tour there with the Marines when he lost several of his comrades, or about how he became homeless in 1995, or how he later lost his legs years after drinking water polluted with dry-cleaning fluid and benzene at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina. "It was hell in Vietnam," Shedrick, 68, said yesterday across from Independence Hall, where he watched participants arrive at the end of Philly's first Veterans Day parade.
NEWS
November 8, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Add it to the list of notable Philadelphia firsts. On Friday, Philly became the first U.S. municipality to gain the elite title of World Heritage City, joining the likes of Paris, Florence, Jerusalem, St. Petersburg, and Prague. Those who lobbied for the designation - which for months has seemed inevitable, and officially was approved at the World Heritage organization's general congress in Arequipa, Peru - call it a point of civic pride. But they stress that the title has tangible benefits, too, with the potential to draw hundreds of millions of dollars in tourism revenue, strengthen Philadelphia's international image, and open business connections with the 266 other World Heritage cities around the globe.
NEWS
November 2, 2015 | BY PAIGE GROSS, Daily News Staff Writer pgross@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
Update: Dallas Cowboys defensive end Greg Hardy played college football for the University of Mississippi ("Ole Miss"). His college and position were incorrectly listed. THE STREETS of Philadelphia will experience plenty of spirit this Halloween, but not just of the spooky variety. That spirit peaked yesterday as hundreds of Temple students, alumni and fans donned cherry and white and cheered, on Market Street between 5th and 6th, in the background of the first of many "ESPN College GameDay" broadcasts leading up to tonight's game against Notre Dame.
NEWS
October 31, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The city has allowed ESPN to close a block of Market Street near Independence Mall for more than 48 hours to set up its roving weekly football College GameDay live telecast. ESPN chose Philadelphia because of the interest in undefeated Temple University's game Saturday night against Notre Dame. The sold-out event at Lincoln Financial Field is this weekend's prime-time college football game. Hosting the show offers great exposure for Philadelphia, Mayor Nutter's spokesman Mark McDonald said Thursday night, calling it "an excellent opportunity to market the city to a national audience.
SPORTS
October 28, 2015 | By Mike Kern, Daily News Staff Writer
SO, REALLY, where else did you think ESPN's "College GameDay" pregame show would possibly go Saturday? It pretty much had to be here, with 21st-ranked Temple (7-0) playing No. 9 Notre Dame (6-1) at Lincoln Financial Field on Halloween night in a nationally televised game on ABC. And yesterday, the network finally made it official. The show, which runs from 9 a.m. until noon, will originate from Independence Mall. The only other time the show came to Philadelphia was in November 2002, for Penn-Harvard.
NEWS
October 23, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ARCHITECTS FROM Frank Lloyd Wright to Frank Gehry have always been a rare breed, as aloof and self-centered as Ayn Rand's Howard Roark. Frank Vitetta understood this very well. He realized that to many architects, marketing their services is beneath them. "Architects often put the aesthetics of their profession ahead of marketing," he told a class of architectural students at Temple University in 1994. "For many, marketing has always been a no-no, and some may still feel it is inappropriate.
SPORTS
September 29, 2015 | Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Columnist
THERE ARE bound to be countless stories emanating from the pope's weekend visit. Most figure to last a lifetime. So why shouldn't one of them involve golf? It seems his holiness needed a way to get around the grounds at St. Charles Seminary, where he stayed during his time here. And it happened that a member of the Union League of Philadelphia, who prefers to remain unnamed, was part of the group responsible for helping bring Pope Francis to Philly. Since that organization recently purchased Torresdale-Frankford Golf Club in the Greater Northeast (now known as the Union League G.C. at Torresdale)
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