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Independence Park

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NEWS
February 28, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Independence National Historical Park generated about $150 million in visitor spending in 2011, according to a new economic impact report. The spending supported just over 2,000 jobs in the Philadelphia region, according to the analysis. The report, conducted by Michigan State University at the behest of the National Park Service, shows that Independence Park, combined with other sites administered by the park - the Thaddeus Kosciuszko National Memorial and the Edgar Allan Poe National Historic Site - drew 3.59 million visitors in 2011.
NEWS
February 15, 1994 | By BRUCE CRAIG
For people throughout the United States and the world there are few more important historic sites than Independence National Historical Park. In the assembly room of Independence Hall, visitors listen raptly as national park rangers tell the dramatic story of how the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution came to be. At the Liberty Bell pavilion, children wait, sometimes a little impatiently, for their chance to touch the famous cracked...
NEWS
January 24, 2003 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mary Bomar, superintendent of the Oklahoma City National Memorial and the Washita Battlefield National Historic Site, will be the next superintendent of Independence National Historical Park, the National Park Service announced yesterday. Bomar, who joined the Park Service in 1990 after more than a decade in various Defense Department administrative posts, will assume her new duties Feb. 10. She will succeed Martha Aikens, who left Philadelphia about a year ago to run Park Service training and development programs in Washington.
NEWS
September 18, 2007 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
Dennis Reidenbach, superintendent of Independence National Historical Park since late 2005, has been named head of the National Park Service's busy Northeast regional office. Reidenbach will oversee the doings at national parks and monuments in 13 states that combined draw 55 million visitors a year. Mary Bomar, head of the park service and a former superintendent at Independence Park, praised Reidenbach, a 24-year park service employee, as "an effective leader" and manager.
NEWS
February 11, 1987
Your editorial of Feb. 4 objecting to "user fees" for Independence National Historical Park represents a dangerous attitude toward government. A user fee essentially says: Only if you choose to tour the park do you have to pay. The Inquirer's idea of a "free" park says: Whether or not you choose to tour the Park you must - through taxes - pay. There is no such thing as a free lunch. The Inquirer's conception of government - with its hostility to individual choice and the free market - simply shifts the burden of government services from those who benefit from such services to the taxpayers as a whole.
NEWS
December 18, 1986 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
National Park Service officials in Washington plan next year to charge entry fees for the first time at Independence and Valley Forge National Historical Parks as part of a national effort to boost park service revenues. The federal official in charge of Independence Park has warned that any charge would be "disastrous" - particularly in light of the forthcoming celebration of the bicentennial of the U.S. Constitution. But the regional director for both Independence and Valley Forge declined to oppose park service policy.
NEWS
September 12, 1990
Independence Park is supposed to be available for all the people all the time. Vice President Nelson Rockefeller once asked Park Superintendent Hobie Cawood if he could use Independence Hall for a day-long conference on urban problems. The answer was immediate and straightforward - NO. Cawood didn't even apologize. The park was for everyone, all the time. The family from Nebraska visiting Philadelphia for the day was every bit as important to Cawood as any vice president. So, Rockefeller went up the street to a hotel for his conference, and the park remained open to all. Now it appears budget cuts might close much of the park to everyone.
NEWS
July 24, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Visitors to Independence National Historical Park in 2013 spent about $196 million, an increase of about $1 million over the previous year, despite a slight drop in park attendance, according to a report released by the National Park Service. In 2013, spending by 3,560,637 visitors supported 2,730 jobs in the Philadelphia area, the report said. In 2012, the park attracted 3,615,698 visitors supporting 2,736 jobs. Park sites include the Independence Mall historic district, the Edgar Allan Poe National Historic Site on North Seventh Street, the Germantown White House, and the Thaddeus Kosciuszko National Memorial on Pine Street.
NEWS
July 5, 1994 | By WILLIAM C. KASHATUS
John Adams onced sniffed, "The history of our Revolution will be one continuous lie from one end to the other. The essence of the whole will be that Dr. Franklin's electrical rod smote the earth and out sprang Gen. Washington, fully clothed and on his horse. Franklin then proceeded to electrify them with his rod and thence forward these three - Franklin, Washington and the horse - conducted all the policy, negotiations, and war. " Although Adams' sarcasm was reflective of his infamous jealousy for being overshadowed by the other Founding Fathers, it is doubtful that the National Park Service could conjure a better image to sell Philadelphia's history.
NEWS
February 1, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
About 8 a.m. Thursday, in gusty winds, the Bicentennial Bell - a six-ton 1976 gift from the one-time mother country to the people of the United States - was lifted from its home in the Independence Park bell tower at Third and Chestnut Streets, and lowered slowly onto two red steel pedestals at street level. A few hours later, held firmly by yellow hoists attached to a yellow crane, it was lifted again and guided into a great crate, to be trucked away to storage. Independence National Historical Park officials must now mull where the bell's next permanent home will be. The dramatic move from the 130-foot tower at the northern end of the old visitor-center site also marks the most public evidence that change is coming.
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NEWS
August 26, 2016
By Cynthia MacLeod Hip Hip Huzzah! One hundred years ago, on Aug. 25, 1916, President Woodrow Wilson signed the act that created the National Park Service "to conserve the scenery and the natural and historic objects and the wildlife therein and to provide for the enjoyment of the same in such manner and by such means as will leave them unimpaired for future generations. " For 100 years, the NPS has been entrusted with the care of our national parks. With support from volunteers and partners, the Park Service safeguards 412 special places and shares their stories with more than 275 million visitors every year.
NEWS
August 27, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
In recent years, Philadelphia Flower Show themes have whisked visitors to far-flung destinations from Ireland to Hawaii and the fictional Arendelle (the kingdom in Frozen , as part of last year's blockbuster "Celebrate the Movies" show, featuring a Disney partnership). But the 2016 show, from March 5 to 13, will draw inspiration from closer to home. As an ornate, national parks-theme cake melted under the afternoon sun on Tuesday - Founders' Day to the National Park Service - officials from the Park Service and the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society gathered on Independence Mall to unveil the theme, "Explore America: 100 Years of the National Park Service.
NEWS
August 19, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
After nearly five years of intermittently blank and soundless video screens; leaking glass and torn-up paving tiles; fogged-up windows; and repeated efforts to stanch water and repair breakdowns, the city is close to turning over its effort to fashion a functioning President's House to the care of Independence National Historical Park. The city managed both design and construction of the $10.5 million commemorative site, which marks the spot where Presidents George Washington and John Adams lived and worked, and where Washington held nine enslaved Africans.
NEWS
July 20, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite its perch on sacred ground - the place where Thomas Jefferson drafted the Declaration of Independence - the Graff House is usually closed and not often visited. Paint peels from the shutters, and the door is sprayed gray with the exhaust of buses and cars. Now its fortunes may be about to change. The development surging across a reviving Market East corridor promises to send thousands of potential visitors past the house at Seventh and Market Streets. And an Independence Park group is planning fund-raising to help pay for millions of dollars needed to repair the Colonial-style brick house.
NEWS
March 27, 2015
WHAT Independence Park is to this country - a sacred space embodying our history and identity - LOVE Park is to the city. In many ways, LOVE Park (officially, JFK Plaza) might be considered Independence Park 2.0. It was created in 1965 - the brainchild of uber-city planner Edmund Bacon - with the iconic Robert Indiana LOVE sculpture installed during the country's bicentennial, and since then it has become a nexus for public gathering, public protest - and, unfortunately, too often public urination.
NEWS
November 2, 2014 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
You are in Philadelphia for a few hours. You have an impulse to explore before leaving. You stand on a downtown sidewalk and wonder - what's around the corner that would be perfect for me to see? A marketing study about Philadelphia's historic district has yielded a high-tech answer that could find its way into the smartphones of on-the-fly travelers and send them to Independence Mall. A build-your-own-itinerary app that would serve up results based on a user's passions and available free time is being considered.
NEWS
July 24, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Visitors to Independence National Historical Park in 2013 spent about $196 million, an increase of about $1 million over the previous year, despite a slight drop in park attendance, according to a report released by the National Park Service. In 2013, spending by 3,560,637 visitors supported 2,730 jobs in the Philadelphia area, the report said. In 2012, the park attracted 3,615,698 visitors supporting 2,736 jobs. Park sites include the Independence Mall historic district, the Edgar Allan Poe National Historic Site on North Seventh Street, the Germantown White House, and the Thaddeus Kosciuszko National Memorial on Pine Street.
NEWS
July 5, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The two documents are rarely exhibited - and not easily accessed behind the many layers of security. To see them, Lee Arnold, library director at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, uses an entry card to pass into an elevator, then into a large locked room, No. 210. Inside, he twirls the tumbler of a combination lock on thick vault doors, then swings them open to reveal still another set of metal doors with a coded digital lock. Beyond is the climate-controlled chamber filled with historical treasures - and a heavy safe, accessed by keys held only by Arnold and the institution's director of research.
NEWS
May 23, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nearly four years after its supposed completion, the President's House commemorative site on Independence Mall is so plagued with chronic leaks, water pooling, and moisture drenching the ruins of George Washington's and John Adams' executive mansion that Independence Park may have to cover the site to protect the archaeological remains. While the memorial, at Sixth and Market Streets, is within the park's confines, the city managed its construction with the understanding that it would turn over a finished, functioning President's House to the park's care.
NEWS
November 7, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Deborah Williams Troemner, 81, of Lumberton, a prominent former volunteer for the Philadelphia Museum of Art, died Monday, Nov. 4, at the Samaritan Hospice Inpatient Center in Mount Holly of complications after a stroke. A resident of Moorestown from 1956 to 2000, Mrs. Troemner had lived since then at the Lumberton campus of Medford Leas, the retirement community. A volunteer guide at the Art Museum from the 1960s into the 1990s, Mrs. Troemner was an administrator of museum volunteers in the middle 1980s, her son, Robert W. III, said in a phone interview.
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