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Independent Contractors

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BUSINESS
June 9, 1993 | By Esther Wallen, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
When Sally Sumner and Pamela Grau's nursing agency was audited by the Internal Revenue Service in 1984, the two owners of Criticare Nursing Inc. faced more than $100,000 in back taxes and penalties. The IRS alleged that the 25 nurses who used Criticare to find jobs were actually agency employees, not independent contract workers. That meant the Holmes, Delaware County, agency should have withheld wage and Social Security taxes from the nurses' pay, rather than leaving it to the workers themselves, the IRS said.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1996 | By Julie Stoiber, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This report contains information from The San Jose Mercury News
They sat side by side at Microsoft Corp. in Redmond, Wash., doing the same jobs, working the same hours, reporting to the same supervisors. Some were called employees; the others, independent contractors. The employees had a pension plan and other fringe benefits; the independent contractors did not. The independent contractors went to court, and a federal appeals panel recently ordered Microsoft to pay them benefits, a ruling that could change the way corporations across America supplement their permanent workforces.
BUSINESS
January 16, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the latest twist on the continuing legal tangle over whether workers are defined as employees or independent contractors, the New Jersey Supreme Court said Wednesday that workers are considered to be employees unless the company can prove otherwise. The case, filed in 2010 in federal court in New Jersey, was closely-watched by business owners and unions. Three New Jersey men, two from the area, who delivered Sleepy's mattresses contended they were improperly classified as independent contractors, causing them to lose benefits and forcing them to cover expenses that should have been paid by Sleepy's L.L.C.
NEWS
August 29, 1993 | By Lisa L. Colangelo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When students return to school a week from Wednesday, they'll see the familiar faces of secretaries, janitors and others who have worked for years in the buildings of this small district. Instead of seeing them working behind a desk or with a mop in hand, these 16 men and women will be marching outside the schools, holding picket signs. The battle between the district and the Morrisville Educational Support Personnel Association continues. After failed negotiations, the district allowed the MESPA contract to expire in July and then hired independent contractors to fill the positions at a substantially lower cost.
BUSINESS
March 19, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Are the drivers who deliver Sleepy's mattresses employees or independent contractors? The outcome of a case argued Monday in New Jersey Supreme Court could have major ramifications for businesses and workers. "This argument is about more than my three drivers," said Anthony L. Marchetti Jr., the Cherry Hill lawyer who filed a lawsuit in 2010 on behalf of Sam Hargrove, Andre Hall, and Marco Eusebio. That's because appellate judges in federal court, where the case was originally filed, have asked New Jersey's Supreme Court to devise a test to be used to determine, in general, whether workers are employees or independent contractors under New Jersey state wage laws.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2007 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The debate over whether to license electrical and telecommunications workers in Philadelphia has been put off indefinitely. Councilman Juan Ramos, who had introduced legislation in December to license the two groups of workers, said he tabled the bill because "the issue is very complex, highly technical, and, I think, requires more work and further input. " The International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 98, run by the politically powerful John Dougherty, had backed the bill, arguing that it was necessary to reduce fires in the city.
NEWS
March 23, 1987
I think that the city should hire more independent contractors to improve Fairmount Park. Earl Stout is following the wrong course when he chases away an independent contractor. His time would be better spent in supervisory and educational activities with the members of his union. A few months ago, I observed a clean-up crew of three men in a parking area of the park. One man ran around to pick up paper in a haphazard way; the second spent the time throwing rocks aimlessly on to the grass; the third guarded the truck.
NEWS
July 24, 1997 | By Molly Ivins
We continue to march militantly in the wrong direction - due, as ever, to the insane system of campaign financing we allow to persist. Here's the latest move by corporate America to make our lives more miserable. There's a stinky little hickey in the tax bill passed by the House of Representatives that would make it much, much easier for companies to reclassify their employees as independent contractors. And independent contractors, of course, do not get health insurance, pension benefits or unemployment insurance.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen and Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writers
Owners of grocery stores and hoagie and cheesesteak shops can expect to receive their Amoroso rolls Tuesday morning, as a federal injunction remains in force until a hearing set for Thursday. There had been a scramble to find rolls Monday after protesting drivers blocked the Amoroso's driveway and stopped deliveries. "For us, it's a pain in the neck," said Richard Phelps, owner of Chubby's in Philadelphia's Roxborough neighborhood. "I had to scramble to get rolls from another source.
BUSINESS
January 7, 1986 | By James Asher, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tasty Baking Co. reported yesterday that it had taken in $16.1 million from selling delivery routes to drivers for its TastyKake Division. The sales, which were announced to employees in October, basically changed Tasty's distribution system from one in which hundreds of employees delivered TastyKake products to a system of independent contractors who would share in the profits of the routes. In all, 359 routes in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware and Maryland were sold. Initially, the company's requirement that each driver purchase his route or face the loss of his job was met with some opposition.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
September 11, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Uber's billboards promised opportunities to earn $25 to $30 an hour, so Takele Gobena quit his $9-an-hour job at the Seattle airport, borrowed money to buy a car, and began working as a driver for Uber and Lyft. "We're not earning a living wage," Gobena said. After expenses, he said, he wound up earning $2.64 an hour, not enough to cover car payments or support his infant daughter. Gobena served as Exhibit A on Wednesday as advocates for low-wage workers released a report about problems and possible solutions for a growing class of workers such as Gobena in what is known as the on-demand economy.
BUSINESS
January 16, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the latest twist on the continuing legal tangle over whether workers are defined as employees or independent contractors, the New Jersey Supreme Court said Wednesday that workers are considered to be employees unless the company can prove otherwise. The case, filed in 2010 in federal court in New Jersey, was closely-watched by business owners and unions. Three New Jersey men, two from the area, who delivered Sleepy's mattresses contended they were improperly classified as independent contractors, causing them to lose benefits and forcing them to cover expenses that should have been paid by Sleepy's L.L.C.
NEWS
November 10, 2014
C HRISTOPHER CAPORALE, 21, of Havertown, is a St. Joseph's University junior and founder of Waterless Works, a water-free mobile car-wash business. The new, five-person startup allows customers to schedule a car wash at a time/place that's convenient. It says each of its car washes saves 38 gallons of water, and for every car wash completed five gallons of clean water is donated to WaterisLife, a charity that provides clean drinking water to families in Ghana, Kenya and India. Q: How'd you come up with the idea?
BUSINESS
March 19, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Are the drivers who deliver Sleepy's mattresses employees or independent contractors? The outcome of a case argued Monday in New Jersey Supreme Court could have major ramifications for businesses and workers. "This argument is about more than my three drivers," said Anthony L. Marchetti Jr., the Cherry Hill lawyer who filed a lawsuit in 2010 on behalf of Sam Hargrove, Andre Hall, and Marco Eusebio. That's because appellate judges in federal court, where the case was originally filed, have asked New Jersey's Supreme Court to devise a test to be used to determine, in general, whether workers are employees or independent contractors under New Jersey state wage laws.
NEWS
February 21, 2013
P AUL BENNETT, 42, and his wife, Lani Bevacqua, 42, of Southwest Center City, own Context Travel, on South Street near 22nd. Context, which started in 2003, had $3.8 million in revenue last year. It's a network of scholars in archaeology, art history and culture who design and lead in-depth walking seminars for small groups of curious travelers in 23 cities worldwide. Bevacqua oversees the website and advertising, and Bennett manages finances and staff. We spoke with Bennett. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for Context?
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | By Peter Orsi, Associated Press
HAVANA - Cuba's economy czar said Thursday that the government is planning more measures to support and increase the ranks of independent workers and small business owners, including the authorization of new areas of private employment. Real estate broker, delivery person, antiques dealer and produce vendor will be among the newly legal private professions, Marino Murillo told lawmakers at the second of their twice-annual sessions. Economists have long said Cuba needs to expand the number of allowable private enterprises, with an emphasis on legalizing more independent white-collar work.
SPORTS
September 21, 2012 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Staff Writer
FOR THE generally uncompelling, perpetually confusing and often ignored FedEx Cup, it hardly could have worked out better. Tiger vs. Rory: A Ryder Cup preview. Rory McIlroy entered Thursday's Tour Championship first in the FedEx Cup points race. Tiger stands second. Perfect. Golf and its marketers are preoccupied with the biennial hypefest, next week's Ryder Cup. Meanwhile, the NASCAR-emulation that is the FedEx Cup finishes this weekend. Given the $8 million purses and the $1.44 million first-place money for each of the four events, and given the $10 million bonus awarded the overall points winner, the FedEx Cup really should be a bigger deal than, at least, the Ryder Cup. These are professional golfers, after all, independent contractors who compete as small corporations.
NEWS
July 19, 2012 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
Five years after the New Jersey Legislature cracked down on abuse of state pension benefits by local government lawyers and other professionals, little has changed, according to a scathing report released by the state comptroller Tuesday. In a review of just 58 of the state's more than 1,000 municipalities and school districts, investigators found that all but one had failed to properly pull those disqualified from receiving benefits from their pension rolls. In Magnolia, officials relied on the borough lawyer to determine his own pension eligibility until one official threatened to quit, according to the report.
NEWS
December 22, 2011 | By HELEN GYM
WHEN I was a schoolteacher in Olney, a fellow teacher used to regale the staff every September with stories about his travels to Mexico and South and Central America. Relaxing! A journey he'd never forget, he'd crow a little too loudly in staff meetings as he passed around pictures. I still remember the nausea I felt when I opened a national news magazine a few years later to see his face on a story about international child predators. He was serving 10 years in a Mexican prison for soliciting sex from children the same age that he taught at our school.
NEWS
September 5, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Freelancers, independent contractors, consultants, day laborers working off the books for cash, contingent workers, temps, virtual assistants, free agents. These are the names for the ever-growing part of America's labor force with an interesting distinction. They aren't employees. Or at least, they aren't on the payrolls of the companies where they spend their days (or work from home) answering phones, installing drywall, conducting research, delivering packages, engineering bridges, staffing help desks, researching logistics issues, writing Internet copy, implementing new software, cleaning toilets.
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