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NEWS
January 29, 1989 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
For sheer elegance of cuisine and setting, the new Indian restaurant Akbar is hard to beat. Open only two months, Akbar offers an extensive menu of exotically flavored dishes that represent the best of one of the world's most subtle cuisines. Among Akbar's culinary treasures are eight varieties of the delicious breads that make Indian cuisine so outstanding. Sweet-tasting onion paratha ($3.50) was piping-hot layers of soft, pitalike bread flecked with sweet onions, while paneer paratha (also $3.50)
NEWS
August 28, 1987 | By SAM GUGINO, Daily News Restaurant Critic
Indian cuisine deserves ranking with the great cuisines of the world, if for no other reason than the incredible variety of spices used in it. From intoxicating garam masala to heady curry with fenugreek and asafetida in between, Indian cooking has the potential to turn even the most humble food into something special. That said, it is rare that one finds the food in Indian restaurants up to the level it can be. For the most part, such fare is roughly where Italian cooking was in the 1950s, meaning not far beyond the spaghetti-and-meatball stage.
NEWS
March 24, 1991 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
With stunning decor and exceptional Indian cuisine, the new Palace of Asia packs a one-two wallop few other restaurants can match. The place was opened five weeks ago at the Ramada Inn near Route 309 and the Pennsylvania Turnpike. A separate, canopied entrance leads to a fantasyland foyer with faux marbre Roman pillars and a pink mirrored alcove with lifesize a Chinese warrior horse reproduction. The palatial, bi-level dining room seems filled with marble columns and walls; actually, the "marble" is an exquisite example of trompe l'oeil, although the impressive bar itself is made of real white marble.
NEWS
October 18, 1992 | By John V. R. Bull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For as long as I can remember, the Plaza 30 shopping center in Clementon has been blessed with an excellent Indian restaurant, but none that could match the exquisite cuisine of Tandoor Palace. The White Horse Pike restaurant, the latest in an ever-changing line, is 18 months old, itself a minor miracle considering the short tenures of its several predecessors and the small number of cars you'll see in the parking lot. But considering Tandoor Palace's enormous culinary accomplishment with this exquisite cuisine, we are blessed with an overlooked jewel in our midst.
NEWS
June 7, 1987 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
A new location seems to have resulted in a quantum leap in the quality of the cuisine at the India Palace. Indeed, a recent meal was the best I have had anywhere in a long time. The restaurant moved to the Plaza 30 shopping center in Clementon in November after several years in Collingswood. With its emphasis on individually made dishes of amazing subtlety, India Palace is one of the most remarkable restaurants in South Jersey. The dining room is furnished with memorabilia from India, the walls filled with sabers, plates and giant murals of country scenes such as a lion and elephant meeting at a water hole and a farmer plowing his fields behind a water buffalo.
NEWS
April 6, 2008 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
The sparkling warmth of cardamom and curry leaves bloomed above our table at Bindi the moment dinner landed before us. And as I inhaled the aromas of coconut-steeped Goan shrimp, milk-braised lamb, and tangy pork vindaloo ? so seductive, so heady with exotic spice, and so vividly presented ? I couldn?t help but wonder: What took so long? I wasn?t thinking of the service at Bindi, which was timely and informative in the casual but sophisticated way our best BYOBs have refined.
FOOD
June 24, 2016 | By Jill P. Capuzzo, For The Inquirer
Shredded coconut browns very quickly in a toaster oven. The seeds of fresh green chilies can make your fingertips burn. And frying whole cumin, coriander or cardamom seeds until they pop adds an intense flavor that far surpasses that of ground spices. These are just a few of the lessons I learned recently during my first foray into authentic Indian cooking. I also discovered that what seemed effortless for a nimble Indian chef to create in his Center City restaurant kitchen is not so easy for the uninitiated to duplicate at home.
FOOD
January 7, 2010 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
Three years after setting up in the Court at King of Prussia, Legal Sea Foods is preparing to open a second area location this spring, at Philadelphia International Airport. Roger Berkowitz, who heads the Boston-based seafood chain, said Legal would take the space between Terminals B and C previously occupied by a TGI Friday's. The only missing detail is the exact name. At Boston's Logan International Airport and at its newest location in Dedham, Mass., Legal uses a concept called Legal C Bar, selling smaller plates aimed at quick turnover.
FOOD
June 24, 2016
For many venturing into Indian cooking for the first time, the plethora of spices listed in many recipes need not be a disincentive. Here are a few suggestions for working with Indian spices: 1.    To save money, buy your spices at any of the numerous Indian or Asian markets or grocery stores in this area. You'll find large cellophane bags of spice that cost about a third of the price of those tiny jarred spices you'll find in American supermarkets. 2.    Your staple supply of whole spices should include the following: cumin, coriander, black mustard, cardamom, and sesame seeds, plus cloves, bay leaves and dried star anise.
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite its improbable name, Dingledorf's King of Asia is a good place to sample the delights of Indian cuisine. The restaurant in the Larchmont Shopping Center in Mount Laurel retains the name of the delicatessen that preceded its present Indian-American menu, and it's no wonder diners may feel confused, for owner John Singh's culinary schizophrenia makes it difficult to know what to expect. At lunch, the menu offers traditional deli food - sandwiches, salads, hoagies and steak sandwiches, with one Indian special each day. At dinner, however, the emphasis is reversed and the restaurant offers a rich selection of sophisticated Indian cuisine, along with a few selected American dishes.
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FOOD
June 24, 2016
For many venturing into Indian cooking for the first time, the plethora of spices listed in many recipes need not be a disincentive. Here are a few suggestions for working with Indian spices: 1.    To save money, buy your spices at any of the numerous Indian or Asian markets or grocery stores in this area. You'll find large cellophane bags of spice that cost about a third of the price of those tiny jarred spices you'll find in American supermarkets. 2.    Your staple supply of whole spices should include the following: cumin, coriander, black mustard, cardamom, and sesame seeds, plus cloves, bay leaves and dried star anise.
FOOD
June 24, 2016 | By Jill P. Capuzzo, For The Inquirer
Shredded coconut browns very quickly in a toaster oven. The seeds of fresh green chilies can make your fingertips burn. And frying whole cumin, coriander or cardamom seeds until they pop adds an intense flavor that far surpasses that of ground spices. These are just a few of the lessons I learned recently during my first foray into authentic Indian cooking. I also discovered that what seemed effortless for a nimble Indian chef to create in his Center City restaurant kitchen is not so easy for the uninitiated to duplicate at home.
NEWS
May 30, 2013
Will travel for strawberries. Not to mention snap peas, blueberries, green beans, peaches ...  That's us. If it's you, too, head west toward Longview Farm & Market (3215 Stump Hall Road, Collegeville), where the you-pick strawberries will be ripe and ready in June, with lots of good stuff to follow through the growing season. The new Heritage Breed Program spotlights the farm's livestock. Bonus: All-You-Can-Eat Strawberry Pancakes for $5 from 10 a.m.-noon Saturdays and Sundays in June.
FOOD
May 23, 2013 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
Luke's Lobster , a growing quick-serve founded by 28-year-old Maine lobsterman Luke Holden, has opened its first Philadelphia shop in the subterranean space that was Bonté waffles at 130 S. 17th St. (215-564-1415). The look is Down East: wooden picnic tables, corrugated steel ceiling, sailor's knots. It's counter service, with an almost ridiculously simple menu of lobster roll ($15), crab roll ($12), and shrimp roll ($8) - each built on a butter-grilled, split-top roll, plus a couple of chowders and bisques, and a dessert called the Blue Monster (Gifford's of Maine's blueberry ice cream sandwiched between two large, homemade chocolate chip cookies)
FOOD
March 31, 2011 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
With its myriad spices, hard-to-find ingredients, and layered flavors, Indian food may be the final frontier for the American kitchen. "I think people are intimidated by Indian food because there are so many unknowns," says Haneeda Riaz, owner of Haneeda's Kitchen, a Glen Mills-based cooking school focused on Indian cuisine. "They might know the food but they don't know how it's made. " Otherwise intrepid cooks and eaters - the kind of people who've incorporated creme fraiche and paella into their at-home repertoire, the kind of people who will happily order a fiery plate of vindaloo at a restaurant - still seem to shy away from making their own masalas.
FOOD
January 7, 2010 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
Three years after setting up in the Court at King of Prussia, Legal Sea Foods is preparing to open a second area location this spring, at Philadelphia International Airport. Roger Berkowitz, who heads the Boston-based seafood chain, said Legal would take the space between Terminals B and C previously occupied by a TGI Friday's. The only missing detail is the exact name. At Boston's Logan International Airport and at its newest location in Dedham, Mass., Legal uses a concept called Legal C Bar, selling smaller plates aimed at quick turnover.
NEWS
April 6, 2008 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
The sparkling warmth of cardamom and curry leaves bloomed above our table at Bindi the moment dinner landed before us. And as I inhaled the aromas of coconut-steeped Goan shrimp, milk-braised lamb, and tangy pork vindaloo ? so seductive, so heady with exotic spice, and so vividly presented ? I couldn?t help but wonder: What took so long? I wasn?t thinking of the service at Bindi, which was timely and informative in the casual but sophisticated way our best BYOBs have refined.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2008 | By LARI ROBLING For the Daily News
WHEN I FIRST heard about Dahlak and Desi Village Restaurant, I have to admit to needing a fourth grade geography refresher. The Dahlak Archipelago is a group of small islands off the coast of Eritrea, the tiny country in northern East Africa. Politics makes for more confusion, as there were annexes and a revolution as recently as the '60s. But, for our purposes, the cuisine is basically Ethiopian. The history of the restaurant is as confusing as the country. Owner Neghisti Ghebreheiwet closed Dahlak when her husband died several years ago. She reopened on Germantown Avenue about a year ago, but added Indian cuisine and the name "Desi" to reflect the fusion.
FOOD
September 6, 2007 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
If you enjoy Indian cuisine but have been intimidated by the number and complexity of ingredients, you will appreciate the straightforward approach and easy recipes in Neeta Saluja's book Six Spices: A Simple Concept of Indian Cooking (Jones Books, $24.95). In this introduction to Indian cooking and its world of exotic spices, Saluja focuses on the fundamentals of the cuisine. Start with this quick and easy chicken curry. Chicken in Peanut Sauce (Makes 6 to 8 servings)
FOOD
August 31, 2006 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the Philadelphia area, restaurants are rethinking menus, shopkeepers are worrying over stock, and Indian customers, always in search of a bargain, are grumbling. The price of dals - the lentils of various hues that are essential to any proper Indian diet - has skyrocketed in the United States recently, since India stopped exporting them due to a shortage there. The ban has pushed prices two to four or more times higher in this region; in other parts of the country, supplies are short.
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