CollectionsIndian Culture
IN THE NEWS

Indian Culture

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 15, 1986 | By Susan Levine, Inquirer Staff Writer
In Roy Crazy Horse's office are the accoutrements of two vastly different and often clashing lifestyles - one embraced out of choice, the other out of necessity. There are a boom-box-like radio, a Sony television and a videocassette recorder, a walkie-talkie and two safes. There are Crazy Horse's paper- cluttered desk and a telephone with four continuously ringing, buzzing and blinking lines. But as noisy and obtrusive as these items are, they do not obscure the real tone of the room.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1987 | By Peter Landry, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chief Roy Crazy Horse of the Powhatan-Renape Nation is musing: "Music is with our people from the day of birth. You come into the world and are spanked and that is music. The crickets sing and that is music. The wind going through the trees is music. Everything is music. " Chief Roy Crazy Horse is remembering: "The first music I was tuned in to was through the forest, the animals. I would listen to them sing. I also remember the drumming and flute playing that I heard before I was able to walk.
NEWS
March 1, 1992 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
The second graders at the Haverford School were in awe when Tulley Spotted Eagle Boy, a member of the MicMac tribe dressed in full regalia, visited their classes recently. Also known as Ivan Steven Paul, Tulley led the children in spiritual songs and customary tribal dances during their study of American Indians. He talked about Indian customs and what life was like on the reservation. He told the 49 students that Indians would never just kill an animal for sport. They used the skin for their drums, hoofs for rattles, ribs for carving and stirring food and the meat for food.
NEWS
April 26, 1996 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Children and adults can learn about the culture and customs of American Indians through song, dance, stories and crafts tomorrow at Graeme Park in Horsham. The fifth annual Native American Cultural Festival is scheduled rain or shine from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Throughout the day, there will be games, scrimshaw and beadwork demonstrations, and exhibits by the Churchville Nature Center, Leni-Lenape Historical Society, and Museum of Indian Culture. A slide presentation on "Native Americans of Pennsylvania" is planned for 1 p.m., and lectures on trading beads are scheduled for 10:30 a.m. and 3 p.m. Other scheduled events include children's craft classes, an instructional concert and Indian dancing.
NEWS
November 8, 2008 | By Bryce McDevitt INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Many in the Indian community in the Philadelphia area are celebrating Diwali, a Hindu religious festival that is also a secular holiday, a time to take pride in Indian culture and identity. "Anyone can walk in and really get an immersion into Indian culture, and learn about Diwali and what it means," said Jennifer Au, director of grants and international programs for the YMCA of the Upper Main Line in Berwyn. "It's our way of promoting global awareness. " Diwali is the most widely observed holiday in India, Au said.
NEWS
November 9, 1998 | By Lubna Khan, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
As the drummers beat a quickening rhythm, Jasmine Rae Pickner twirled, weaving her body through 25 flexible hoops scattered around her until she had created a flower, her body serving as the stem. "I start the hoop dance with one hoop and I build up, just like creation builds step by step," said Pickner, 13. "This dance represents the circle of life. " Yesterday, she and other members of the Deer Chaser dance troupe performed at Henderson High School in front of an audience of about 150 as part of Native American Month.
NEWS
November 4, 1998 | By Blair Clarkson, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When most Americans call someone a good dancer, they probably are not including precise eyeball movement on the list of reasons. Nor are they giving high marks for spirituality, or the ability to portray three different characters in one short sequence of steps. But in the classical dances of India, there is more to master than steps and rhythm. The effect is one of intricate, full-body motion, with fingers, eyes, neck and limbs moving in opposite directions at the same time.
SPORTS
May 22, 2011 | By John Gonzalez, Inquirer Columnist
The Good Morning America set has to be in violation of New York's maximum-occupancy laws. The studio couch is packed tight with so many bodies these days, you wonder if the producers need the jaws of life to pry the hosts apart after the show. The fire marshal might be worried about that, but it's probably fine with ESPN anchor Kevin Negandhi. When Josh Elliott left SportsCenter and wedged himself onto the GMA set, it created an opportunity for Negandhi. The 36-year-old Phoenixville native and Temple alumnus was chosen as Elliott's replacement for the coveted morning SportsCenter anchor gig. Before arriving in Bristol, Conn., Neghandi had graduated from being the Temple News sports editor to freelancer for USA Today and local TV work in outposts such as Kirksville, Mo., and Sarasota, Fla. At ESPN he has hosted everything from ESPN News to College Football Live to Outside the Lines.
NEWS
May 20, 2012 | By Sara McDermott Jain, FOR THE INQUIRER
Born in the suburbs of Philadelphia, I would never have predicted that my future husband, Ajit, was in India. Yet, at the age of 29, I was sitting in an apartment in Ghaziabad, one mehndiartist on each arm, being decorated with henna tattoos for my Indian wedding. Triangles, flowers, peacocks — even a king and queen. These were the main components of the designs crafted from my fingertips to my elbows, my toes to my knees. Determined to be authentic, I dutifully sat through the four hours required to finish the ornamentation.
NEWS
May 31, 1992 | By Yana Ginburg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Although it would be another hour before the American Indian Arts Festival would formally get under way, throngs of visitors were circling the artist booths. The excitement served as proof for Chief Roy Crazyhorse that interest in Indian culture, both among Indians and others, is growing. "I can see it by the increase of people who attend this festival each year," he said. The festival, held at the Rankokus Indian Reservation in Rancocas during the Memorial Day weekend, offered a veritable pow-wow of Indian culture, bringing together a variety of artists, musicians and dancers.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 17, 2013 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
After he graduated from the youth program at his Hindu temple, Sapan Modi said, he was unsure how to keep contributing to South Jersey's Indian community. On Sunday - in a ballroom buzzing with a success 25 years in the making - he may have found his answer. "This might be the next phase where people can give back," Modi, 27, said as he and 600 others dedicated the Indian Cultural Center in Evesham Township. "I can't contribute $20,000. But I can contribute my time. " South Jersey's burgeoning Indian community has been working to build the center for more than two decades.
NEWS
December 3, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
EVESHAM A table saw was screeching last week at the new Indian Cultural Center in Evesham, workmen were balancing on scaffolding, the concrete floors awaited carpet, and that lavender wall paint had to go. So, will the 20,000-square-foot center on Route 73 be anywhere near ready for its "housewarming" ceremony on Dec. 15? "It will. It will," said Jay Parikh, a Marlton software engineer who is handling communications for the center. "Trust me. " Situated on 18 acres just south of Ardsley Road, the center will feature a large assembly hall capable of seating 570, as well as classrooms, game rooms, two kitchens, and a library.
NEWS
May 20, 2012 | By Sara McDermott Jain, FOR THE INQUIRER
Born in the suburbs of Philadelphia, I would never have predicted that my future husband, Ajit, was in India. Yet, at the age of 29, I was sitting in an apartment in Ghaziabad, one mehndiartist on each arm, being decorated with henna tattoos for my Indian wedding. Triangles, flowers, peacocks — even a king and queen. These were the main components of the designs crafted from my fingertips to my elbows, my toes to my knees. Determined to be authentic, I dutifully sat through the four hours required to finish the ornamentation.
SPORTS
May 22, 2011 | By John Gonzalez, Inquirer Columnist
The Good Morning America set has to be in violation of New York's maximum-occupancy laws. The studio couch is packed tight with so many bodies these days, you wonder if the producers need the jaws of life to pry the hosts apart after the show. The fire marshal might be worried about that, but it's probably fine with ESPN anchor Kevin Negandhi. When Josh Elliott left SportsCenter and wedged himself onto the GMA set, it created an opportunity for Negandhi. The 36-year-old Phoenixville native and Temple alumnus was chosen as Elliott's replacement for the coveted morning SportsCenter anchor gig. Before arriving in Bristol, Conn., Neghandi had graduated from being the Temple News sports editor to freelancer for USA Today and local TV work in outposts such as Kirksville, Mo., and Sarasota, Fla. At ESPN he has hosted everything from ESPN News to College Football Live to Outside the Lines.
NEWS
November 8, 2008 | By Bryce McDevitt INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Many in the Indian community in the Philadelphia area are celebrating Diwali, a Hindu religious festival that is also a secular holiday, a time to take pride in Indian culture and identity. "Anyone can walk in and really get an immersion into Indian culture, and learn about Diwali and what it means," said Jennifer Au, director of grants and international programs for the YMCA of the Upper Main Line in Berwyn. "It's our way of promoting global awareness. " Diwali is the most widely observed holiday in India, Au said.
FOOD
April 5, 2007 | By Dianna Marder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As one who was born in Korea and raised in Brazil, Min Kim proudly draws from both wells to prepare the culinary specialties of each culture. So for the latest meeting of her monthly food group, Forking Delicious, Kim brought brigadeiros - a fudge treat traditionally served at children's birthday parties in Brazil. And then she fascinated the six other women in the group with a description of her mother making kimchee the old-fashioned way - fermenting it in a hole she digs in her backyard.
NEWS
October 13, 2003 | By WILLIAM C. KASHATUS
RUSH LIMBAUGH'S recent remarks about Donovan McNabb sparked a national debate on race in sports. Had Limbaugh made his racist remarks at the turn of the last century, the sports pages in this city probably would have honored the comment by printing a degrading caricature of McNabb. At least that's what they did to Charles Albert Bender, a Hall of Fame pitcher for the Philadelphia Athletics who will be honored on Friday with a state historical marker at Indian Field in Carlisle, Pa. Bender, part Chippewa, arrived in the majors in 1903 as the great hope of Native Americans.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2002 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In the shorthand of immigrants who come from India to America, an FOB is someone "fresh off the boat" and an ABCD is an "American-born confused desi. " The D word is Hindi slang for Indian as Yank is Brit for American. Like the heroes of those beloved assimilation stories Flower Drum Song, Roots and The Godfather, an ABCD is torn between two cultures and trying to find an identity of her own. While none of the principals in Krutin Patel's affectionate and affecting comedy-drama ABCD actually is American-born, the epithet is hurled at Nina (Sheetal Sheth)
NEWS
July 3, 2000 | By Marc Levy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
No one seems to know exactly how many Assamese live in the United States. But one thing is sure: Their numbers are small enough that the Assamese would not upstage an Independence Day parade. "If we were big enough, we'd do a parade," said Aabir Das, 19, a sophomore at George Washington University in Washington who grew up in the Bronx, N.Y. "But we're not. " Instead, the Assamese - who hail from Assam, one of India's most remote northeastern states - have gathered at annual conventions in North America since 1971.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|