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ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
Replacing Andre Watts in a high-profile engagement has long given young pianists a career boost. Watts' Aug. 17 cancellation with the Philadelphia Orchestra at the Saratoga (N.Y.) Performing Arts Center, however, comes with extra gravity: The long-admired 70-year-old pianist has prostate cancer. "It's Andre's wish that we be straight about that," said his manager Linda Marder, whose talent roster at CM Artists includes numerous pianists who are guests of the Philadelphia Orchestra. "Men of a certain age have this problem.
NEWS
August 9, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
By unanimous vote, Neil D. Theobald, a top administrator at Indiana University, was appointed the 10th president of Temple University on Tuesday, following meetings with staff, faculty, and students at which he received positive reviews. "It is great to be an Owl," Theobald told the board of trustees, staff, and reporters shortly after the vote. "This is the dream job I've always wanted to have. " His selection culminates a nearly 10-month national search for the next leader of the 39,000-student campus in the heart of North Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 18, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Temple University in the last year drew record applications, scored a six-spot jump in U.S. News & World Report rankings, moved into the top 100 universities for research expenditures, had unprecedented fund-raising, and enjoyed its most spectacular football season in decades. The Owls were flying high. And yet, the 38,000-student university in the heart of North Philadelphia is facing one of the greatest leadership crises in its history. In the span of two weeks, its president fired its provost, and its board of trustees, in turn, took a vote of no confidence in the president and announced its intention to fire him. That means the university is poised to lose its two top leaders in high-profile ousters that are unusual in and of themselves, but coming at the same time, are even more extraordinary, experts say. "It's pretty unusual, especially that a board would intervene so quickly on the dismissal of a provost without talking extensively with the president, without a thorough investigation," said Joni Finney, director of the Institute for Research on Higher Education at the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
May 5, 2010 | By Phil Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Camden Catholic's Taylor Walsh, a two-time state champion, has signed to attend Indiana University on a wrestling scholarship. Walsh, who won the 135-pound state title in 2009, and the 145-pound title this past winter, becomes the third South Jersey wrestler to sign with the Hoosiers. Paulsboro's Joe Duca, who won the 125-pound state title in March, and Eastern's Preston Keiffer also have signed with Indiana. Walsh is the first two-time state champion in Camden Catholic wrestling history.
SPORTS
November 13, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
Texas Tech basketball coach Bob Knight is suing Indiana University, alleging he lost more than $2 million in income since being fired by the school 2 years ago. Knight contends he was fired without cause, without a proper meeting of university trustees and without a chance to defend himself. The lawsuit was filed in the Monroe County Circuit Court on Friday after talks between his lawyers and the school collapsed. Under state law, the former Hoosiers basketball coach had until yesterday to take legal action.
NEWS
May 3, 2013
Janos Starker, 88, a Hungarian-born master of the cello who emerged from the devastation of World War II to become one of the most powerful instrumentalists of his generation, died Sunday at a hospice in Bloomington, Ind. Indiana University, where Mr. Starker taught for more than five decades, announced his death but did not disclose the cause. For decades, he was one of the most sought-after cellists in the world. He was venerated as a soloist and particularly as an interpreter of Bach, for which he received a Grammy in 1997.
SPORTS
May 12, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Indiana basketball coach Bob Knight has agreed to accept the coaching job at New Mexico, according to a report published today. The Dallas Times-Herald, quoting sources close to Knight and the New Mexico program, reported in today's issue that Knight had reached an oral agreement on a five-year, $350,000-a-year contract with New Mexico. The deal also calls for a $150,000 house. "It's a done deal. Knight's coming," the source in Albuquerque told the newspaper. "All he has to do is sign the contract.
SPORTS
December 3, 1989 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Wally Henry passed for 113 yards and one touchdown, and Fred McAfee ran for 86 yards and another score to lead Mississippi College to a 26-14 victory over Indiana University of Pennsylvania in an NCAA Division II semifinal football game yesterday in Clinton, Miss. Mississippi College (10-3) advances to play Gulf South Conference rival Jacksonville State Saturday for the Division II championship in Florence, Ala. Indiana concludes the season with an 11-2 record. McAfee's 30-yard touchdown run on the Choctaws' first drive gave Mississippi College a lead it wouldn't give up. The Choctaws went up 10-0 with 4 minutes, 3 seconds left in the first quarter on a 28-yard field goal by Robert Jenkins.
SPORTS
March 31, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Bob Knight angrily ordered Indiana University's athletics director away from the team locker room after a loss Feb. 19, and a resulting shouting match became so confrontational that a friend stepped in to separate them, the Indianapolis Star reported yesterday. The incident between Knight and athletics director Clarence Doninger after IU's loss last month to Ohio State ended without violence. But Doninger considered it serious enough to report it to top university administrators, the newspaper reported.
SPORTS
December 2, 2012 | The Inquirer Staff
Baylor's Pierre Jackson scored 17 points and Isaiah Austin and A.J. Walton each added 11 as the Bears (5-2) upended No. 8 Kentucky, 64-55, in Lexington. The loss ended a 55-game home winning streak for the reeling Wildcats (4-3). Archie Goodwin led Kentucky with 17 points but fouled out with 1 minute, 44 seconds left in the game. Louisville 69, Illinois State 66 - Russ Smith had 24 points and Peyton Siva added 20 to help the Cardinals (6-1) escape the Redbirds (5-2) in Louisville, Ky. Duke 88, Delaware 50 - Ryan Kelly scored 18 points and Mason Plumlee had 18 points and 11 rebounds as the Blue Devils (8-0)
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
Replacing Andre Watts in a high-profile engagement has long given young pianists a career boost. Watts' Aug. 17 cancellation with the Philadelphia Orchestra at the Saratoga (N.Y.) Performing Arts Center, however, comes with extra gravity: The long-admired 70-year-old pianist has prostate cancer. "It's Andre's wish that we be straight about that," said his manager Linda Marder, whose talent roster at CM Artists includes numerous pianists who are guests of the Philadelphia Orchestra. "Men of a certain age have this problem.
NEWS
July 18, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Temple University in the last year drew record applications, scored a six-spot jump in U.S. News & World Report rankings, moved into the top 100 universities for research expenditures, had unprecedented fund-raising, and enjoyed its most spectacular football season in decades. The Owls were flying high. And yet, the 38,000-student university in the heart of North Philadelphia is facing one of the greatest leadership crises in its history. In the span of two weeks, its president fired its provost, and its board of trustees, in turn, took a vote of no confidence in the president and announced its intention to fire him. That means the university is poised to lose its two top leaders in high-profile ousters that are unusual in and of themselves, but coming at the same time, are even more extraordinary, experts say. "It's pretty unusual, especially that a board would intervene so quickly on the dismissal of a provost without talking extensively with the president, without a thorough investigation," said Joni Finney, director of the Institute for Research on Higher Education at the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
June 15, 2016 | By Jenice Armstrong
MEMBERS of Kappa Alpha Psi have waged a social media campaign against Donald Trump - and it's not just for the reasons you might think. U.S. District Judge Gonzalo P. Curiel belongs to the predominantly African American fraternity, with headquarters in the 2300 block of North Broad Street. Yes, you read that correctly. He's a Nupe. Curiel, you may recall, is the judge whom the GOP presidential candidate has accused of being too biased to preside over lawsuits involving Trump University because of his Hispanic ethnicity.
NEWS
November 16, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis and Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writers
A member of the judicial panel weighing sanctions against state Supreme Court Justice J. Michael Eakin over offensive emails was himself a recipient of pornographic messages exchanged among another justice and law enforcement officials, documents obtained by The Inquirer show. Eugene Dooley, one of 12 members of the state Judicial Conduct Board, was among a small group of friends who received emails containing sexually explicit content from former Supreme Court Justice Seamus McCaffery and others.
SPORTS
May 20, 2015 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Neil Theobald took over as Temple's president, arriving from Indiana University in January 2013, several athletics staffers from the Big Ten school soon followed. Theobald eventually installed Kevin Clark as Temple's athletic director and Pat Kraft became Clark's top deputy. On Monday, Theobald shuffled the deck, announcing that Kraft would replace Clark as AD, with Clark moving across Broad Street to the newly created position of executive vice president and chief operating officer, subject to the approval of Temple's board of trustees.
NEWS
June 18, 2014
OK, I FEEL the need to defend my native state. Pennsylvania's earned reputation for public corruption is being besmirched. A new study of states ranks us fifth-most-corrupt behind Mississippi, Louisiana, Tennessee and Illinois. I'm here to tell you we've been wronged. We're more corrupt than that. For starters, we have Philadelphia, described more than a century ago by muckraking journalist Lincoln Steffens in The Shame of the Cities as "the most corrupt and the most contented" of all American municipalities.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Debora Kodish arrived in Philadelphia in the early 1980s with her new doctorate in folklore from the University of Texas, there was no one in the city documenting everyday life in its many and varied neighborhoods. No one organization was looking at what the African drummers were doing, what the Hispanic street artists were up to, what the Vietnamese musicians were playing, what the Italians in South Philly were saying - or at why they were doing what they were doing and saying what they were saying.
NEWS
March 8, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
A proposal that would allow West Chester University to withdraw from the state's financially strapped higher-education system could hit students and parents in the pocketbook, the system's chancellor warned Thursday. Were West Chester to become a "state-related" school like Pennsylvania State University, it would most certainly mean higher tuition, fees, and other costs, said Frank T. Brogan, chancellor of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education. Students at Penn State's main campus pay $26,362 annually in tuition, fees, and room and board, compared with about $17,000 annually on average at the 14 state system universities.
SPORTS
January 17, 2014 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
The goal has not changed for Mickey Morandini. The role might. Morandini, 47, still wants to be a long-term member of the Phillies, the team that drafted him out of Indiana University in 1988. He is preparing for his first season as a coach at the team's triple-A Lehigh Valley affiliate after serving as a minor-league manager with short-season Williamsport (2011) and low-A Lakewood (2012-13) the last three years. Last week, however, a curveball was thrown at Morandini in the form of a phone call.
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