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Industrial Arts

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NEWS
September 8, 1992 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
John J. Regn Sr., 45, a Gloucester Township industrial arts teacher whose love of children and teaching was undiminished after more than two decades in the classroom, died Thursday of heart failure at Presbyterian University Hospital in Pittsburgh, where he had been taken for a liver transplant. A lifelong Atco resident, Mr. Regn had taught for 22 years in Gloucester Township - first at the Grenloch School and for the last 17 years at the Glenn Landing School. He also taught wood shop in the Gloucester Township Community Education and Recreation Program for the last 10 years.
NEWS
September 23, 1999 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
James B. Jochem, 52, a decorated Army veteran who had taught industrial arts in Bucks County and New Jersey, died Friday at his home in Lower Makefield Township. He had multiple sclerosis and cancer. Mr. Jochem taught at Morrisville High School for several years before he became too ill to work. Earlier, he taught at Pemberton Township High School in New Jersey. "He was as energetic as his health permitted him to be," said his brother-in-law, John Frantz. "He made as much of life as he could, including attending sports events and working on his home.
NEWS
June 16, 1988 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
Shawn Williams of Klinger Junior High School wrote the word "hello" on an an Etch-A-Sketch last week - without touching the knobs once. Using a computer, Williams and partner Ed O'Neill demonstrated last week how motors could be programmed to draw shapes or write words on the toy's silver screen. Learning how computers could be programmed to run anything mechanical was the point of the ninth-grade industrial arts class, said teacher Nick Rosa. "The traditional industrial arts program has not kept up with progress," he said.
NEWS
April 19, 1992 | By Jennifer Reid Holman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Maybe you still have one of those wine racks or metal trivets you and every other student in your junior high industrial arts class churned out to show you had learned something about technology and machines. In many schools, that routine remains the same. But at the Marlton Middle School, some eighth graders are learning about technology in a way that forces them to work like engineers - inventing their own ways to use principles of science and machines to solve problems.
NEWS
December 9, 1999 | By Michael Sandler, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Shortly after 7:58 a.m., drills buzz, the smell of varnish wafts and a patina of sawdust blankets everything in the Avondale High School wood shop. The students in the home planning and maintenance class work fastidiously in pairs. They are not making bookshelves or jewelry boxes to take home. Each group is building an assigned piece of what will eventually be one large reading loft. Teacher Clint Jones paces the floor with a tape measure ready at his side. Every screw must be flush, each edge smooth enough for a 6-year-old to run a finger along without fear of splinters.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2011
Who: Host, contractor, main dude on "I Hate My Bath," which airs at 10:30 p.m. Tuesdays on the DIY Network. Age: 38 From: Born in Northeast Philly, raised in Langhorne. Now: West Chester Growing up local: When not in class at Neshaminy High School, a teenage Devlin discovered his calling in the industrial arts. His favorite projects were birdhouses he built out of old pallets and sold at craft shows. "I nailed 'em together and called it a career," he said. On the show: Each week, he happy-go-luckily meets mostly Midwestern homeowners on a budget and turns their ugly bathrooms - you know the kind: raggedy fiberglass tub, teensy shower, stained drop ceiling - into a plumbed space in which anyone would proud to spend quality time.
NEWS
May 30, 1993 | For The Inquirer / CHERIE KEMPER-STARNER
A group of costumed music students at Charles Boehm Middle School in Yardley perform "We Are the World" as part of a Special Areas Spectacular Day. Afternoon activities were suspended May 21 so that students could tour the school and see displays of their fellow students' work in such areas as industrial arts, home economics, computer science and physical education, in addition to art and music. The school is part of the Pennsbury School District.
NEWS
November 25, 1987 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
After more than 20 years in the field of industrial arts - first as a carpenter and later as an industrial arts teacher for eight years at Medford's Memorial Middle School - Harry Rensman says he became bored with the "same old routine. " For years, he said, industrial arts courses at the junior high level were synonymous with footstools, bookshelves, bookends, napkin holders and candlesticks. In fact, added Rensman, such items made one step at a time by students still are staples in most industrial arts courses in middle schools.
NEWS
July 19, 1992 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A curriculum stressing 21st-century technological skills will begin replacing an outmoded industrial arts program in the coming school year at the Rancocas Valley Regional High School, according to the district's superintendent. The superintendent, Henry Cram, said the district was developing a curriculum that would incorporate the use of computers and robotics and teach students how to solve problems. "What we are doing is shifting away from teaching the students to produce a product to helping them to understand the entire process of creating something," Cram said.
NEWS
February 13, 1994 | By Laurent Sacharoff, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The school district will ask voters to approve a $550,000 bond referendum so the roof and air-conditioning system at the Anne C. Jacques School, on Washington Avenue, can be replaced and projects at other schools can be carried out. The vote would be in April. Half the money would pay for work on the elementary school's 30-year-old roof, which is leaking, and for replacement of the outdated air-conditioning system, Superintendent Walt Dold said last week. The rest of the money would be used to maintain and update facilities at other schools.
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NEWS
October 6, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bernard Shaw Proctor, 92, of West Chester, a decorated member of the Tuskegee Airmen, died Monday, Sept. 30, at Pottstown Memorial Medical Center. Dr. Proctor, a native of Darby Borough, was selected as a young man to go to Tuskegee (Ala.) Institute. He became an officer in the Original 99th Fighter Squadron, Tuskegee Airmen, and fought for almost two years in North Africa, Italy, and France during World War II. For his service, Dr. Proctor received numerous military awards, including 12 battle stars, three distinguished unit citations, and the European-African-Middle Eastern ribbon.
NEWS
August 21, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Irma Domke Lebing, 95, an artist who was a public-school art teacher in Elkins Park, died Wednesday, Aug. 15, of dementia at Brookside Healthcare & Rehabilitation Center in Roslyn. Born in Fort Wayne, Ind., and raised in Philadelphia's Frankford section, Mrs. Lebing graduated from Frankford High School in 1935 and, with an art scholarship, from what is now the University of the Arts at Broad and Pine Streets in 1940. She earned a bachelor's degree in education at Temple University in 1941.
NEWS
June 7, 2012 | By Kristen A. Graham and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More layoff notices are going out to Philadelphia School District employees Friday, officials confirmed, with school support personnel and counselors most heavily targeted. Philadelphia Federation of Teachers president Jerry Jordan said he had been notified that about 260 pink slips would be issued. All will be effective June 30. In all, 97 "supportive service assistants," 85 parent ombudsmen/student advisers, 39 counselors, 22 nonteaching assistants, nine school operations officers, six secretaries, and four teachers — two of home economics, two industrial arts — will be laid off, Jordan said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2012 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER
On Wednesday, the University of the Arts opens its doors for its mega-fund-raiser, the fourth annual ArtUnleashed. More than 300 alumni, student and faculty artists will gather to display their wares for the cause of student scholarships. UArts will also debut its Alumni Spotlight Gallery, featuring one of the school's most notable students, illustrator Arnold Roth, beneficiary of a scholarship back in 1946. A legendary contributor to the New Yorker, Playboy, Sports Illustrated, and Punch - to say nothing of a long career doing jazz album art and book covers - Roth built an aesthetic on cheerfully pointed and exaggerated elongated characters, a look that predates the similar, but decidedly sinister, stylizations of Ralph Steadman and Gerald Scarfe.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2011
Who: Host, contractor, main dude on "I Hate My Bath," which airs at 10:30 p.m. Tuesdays on the DIY Network. Age: 38 From: Born in Northeast Philly, raised in Langhorne. Now: West Chester Growing up local: When not in class at Neshaminy High School, a teenage Devlin discovered his calling in the industrial arts. His favorite projects were birdhouses he built out of old pallets and sold at craft shows. "I nailed 'em together and called it a career," he said. On the show: Each week, he happy-go-luckily meets mostly Midwestern homeowners on a budget and turns their ugly bathrooms - you know the kind: raggedy fiberglass tub, teensy shower, stained drop ceiling - into a plumbed space in which anyone would proud to spend quality time.
NEWS
December 8, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
H. Paul Fitzpatrick Jr., 74, a retired mechanical engineer and former president of the West Chester Borough Council, died Saturday, Dec. 4, of complications from pneumonia at Chester County Hospital. Mr. Fitzpatrick served on the Borough Council from 2000 to 2008 and was council president for three years. He was past president of the West Chester Business Improvement District and in 2004 chaired the West Chester Council of Governments. A Democrat, he made an unsuccessful run for mayor in 2001.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2010
Sunday Words and music Singer Jill Sobule ("I Kissed a Girl") and comedian Julia Sweeney ( Saturday Night Live ) combine forces for the Jill And Julia Show , weaving Sobule's songs with Sweeney's funny, poignant tales of dealing with personal issues. They perform at 7:30 p.m. at the Sellersville Theater , 24 W. Temple Ave., Sellersville. Tickets are $21.50. Call 215-257-5808. Monday Faces out Painter George Shinn studied at the University of the Arts when it was the Philadelphia Museum School of Industrial Arts, but went into business after the death of his father.
NEWS
June 3, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Adam C. Pfeffer, 62, of Stone Harbor, N.J., a former Cherry Hill middle school teacher who went on to be superintendent of the Collingswood School District and two Jersey Shore districts, died Sunday, May 23, at his home after an illness. Dr. Pfeffer not only acquired the necessary funding for renovations and new construction in the three districts, but he also was an innovator, from bringing cable to classrooms to improving performing-arts programs. "I'm not going to say he was the best ever, but . . . I haven't met anyone who was better than him," said Ian Wachstein, who served on the Collingswood school board during and after Dr. Pfeffer's time as superintendent.
NEWS
April 28, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Haddonfield native Deborah Remington, 79, a Manhattan-based abstract artist whose work featuring mechanical and organic references has been exhibited all over the world, died of cancer Wednesday, April 21, at CareOne in Moorestown. Though Miss Remington's great-uncle was Frederic Remington, the famous artist who captured the American West in his action-filled paintings, she made only side references to him when speaking of artistic talent in her genes, said those who knew her. She wanted to make a name for herself and focus on her own abstract niche.
NEWS
April 18, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gerry E. "Gus" Zeager, 74, of Ambler, an industrial-arts educator in the Wissahickon School District and a sports coach and official, died of cancer Friday, April 9, at home. Mr. Zeager began his career in the late 1950s, teaching woodworking at Wissahickon High School in Lower Gwynedd. Thirty years later, he was teaching robotics and computer and laser technology at the high school, Wissahickon Middle School, and the district's elementary schools. He was also supervisor of the district's practical-arts curriculum.
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