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Industrial Arts

NEWS
November 14, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Harriet Ann Proctor Tyler, 92, formerly of Williamstown, a teacher in Philadelphia public schools for 34 years, died Monday at Hayes Manor in Philadelphia. Mrs. Tyler taught special education and industrial arts in Philadelphia public schools from 1948 until retiring in 1982. Her first assignment was at Madison School in Fishtown, and she spent most of her career at Douglas High School in Port Richmond. A native of Norfolk, Va., she earned a bachelor's degree from Howard University in 1946.
NEWS
October 21, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Stuart Henri Yost of Center City, an artist, educator and genealogist, died at Hahnemann University Hospital on Oct. 4, the day after his 79th birthday. He had never regained consciousness after choking at a dinner given in his honor several days earlier. Mr. Yost, whose father was a Marine Corps colonel, was born in Parris Island, S.C., and lived in Shanghai, China, as a child. He graduated from Episcopal Academy, and earned a degree in fine arts from the Philadelphia Museum School of Industrial Arts, a predecessor of the University of the Arts.
NEWS
June 28, 2005 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William B. Schoenleber, 81, a master wood craftsman and a longtime teacher of woodworking in the Philadelphia public schools, died June 17 of lung cancer at his home in Wildwood Crest, N.J. After graduating from the old Northeast High School at Eighth Street and Lehigh Avenue in 1942, Mr. Schoenleber briefly studied woodworking as an apprentice. When World War II broke out, he joined the Navy. Within a few months, he was a carpenter's mate third class on a ship in the Pacific. After the war, Mr. Schoenleber earned a bachelor's degree in education in 1948 from Millersville University, then known as Millersville State Teachers College.
NEWS
August 3, 2003 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
During the early years of the 20th century, Bucks County emerged as an important center for handmade custom picture frames in the country. The reason the craft developed there was that the county had a flourishing art colony whose artists needed frames for their paintings. These frame-making artisans were part of the Arts and Crafts movement, which traveled from England to America during the late 19th or early 20th centuries. The Arts and Crafts movement was a reaction to the Industrial Revolution, which created machine-made sameness and made craftsmen superfluous.
NEWS
June 27, 2002 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Richard Hoptner, 81, a Philadelphia sculptor who expressed through his art the trauma he experienced as a World War II bomber crewman, died Tuesday of complications associated with Alzheimer's disease at Germantown Home, a retirement facility. He had been a resident of the Chestnut Hill section of Philadelphia after living and working for many years in Germantown. Mr. Hoptner carved images in wood, particularly mahogany and teak. He created expressionistic sculptures, and in them he tried to convey the theme of human suffering and devastation brought on by war. Also a poet, he wrote bitter verse reflective of the suffering he saw and felt as an Army Air Corps radio operator and gunner on a B-17 "Flying Fortress.
NEWS
March 21, 2002 | By Eils Lotozo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When George Shinn was downsized after a 35-year career in the corporate world, he discovered a cruel fact: Nobody wanted to hire a middle manager nearing 60. Shinn's solution? He chucked business and became an artist. Now, at 72, the West Philadelphia resident has his first one-man show of paintings at Old City's Highwire Gallery. No tame landscapes or proper still-lifes for Shinn. His huge, cartoonish heads sport cantaloupe-colored skin and turquoise hair and have wry titles like "Six Guys Who Wouldn't Be Caught Dead Carrying a Doggie Bag. " If his bold, rough-edged paintings - he calls them "faux portraiture" - don't exactly look like what you'd expect from a septuagenarian ex-businessman, that's fine with Shinn.
NEWS
February 8, 2002 | By Sheila Dyan FOR THE INQUIRER
When the former home of Penn-Lippincott Publishing Co. (circa 1910) was converted to apartments by Historic Landmarks for Living in the late 1980s, what remained of the original structure was everything big - huge windows, towering columns, spacious rooms, high ceilings. Newly added, however, were the kinds of intimate spaces that can make an industrial building feel like home. Providing a dramatic entrance to the 110 one- and two-bedroom apartments is the controlled-access lobby, which boasts a 30-plus-foot ceiling and mammoth walls of glass.
NEWS
September 18, 2001 | By Dianna Marder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You know his work, maybe from seeing it in the New Yorker, Esquire or Time. Perhaps Playboy or Sports Illustrated? Mad Magazine? Punch? TV Guide? Entertainment Weekly? He's drawn cartoons, illustrations, comic strips, record album jackets, book jackets, advertisements, and animation. During the early '60s, his comic strip, Poor Arnold's Almanac, ran in the Sunday comics in The Inquirer, right under Peanuts. His pen-and-ink style defines inimitable. Yet after 50 years on the job, cartoonist Arnold Roth still has no employer.
NEWS
February 5, 2001 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
To neighboring farmers, the construction of Humphrey's Hall, now part of Cheyney University in Thornbury, must have been an intriguing sight. Like any big-city project, there had been months of talk and planning, along with swarms of people who came out to the open fields of the former George Cheyney property, farmed since William Penn's day. There were surveyors, for instance, who came to walk the fields and plan the positioning of what...
NEWS
May 22, 2000 | By Patrick Kerkstra, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Shop class. The last bastion of simple labor left in standards-driven schools. A chance for students to leave behind math formulas and biology, take hammer and saw in hand, and concentrate quietly on building a birdhouse, stool or wooden toolbox. Not anymore. Shop teachers hired for their art with a band saw or drill press are now teaching students a dizzying array of applied science and engineering skills. Pneumatics. Aeronautics. Robotics. Even digital video production. The trend is fueled partly by declining student interest in traditional shop, but educators say the boom in technology and technology-related jobs is the biggest reason for the change.
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