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Industrial Park

NEWS
January 26, 2012 | By Ramit Plushnick-Masti, Associated Press
HOUSTON - Buckets of rain and powerful winds that apparently spawned several tornadoes swept across Texas on Wednesday, forcing drivers to abandon cars on flooded roads but not dropping enough water to make up for a historic dry spell. The squall of storms swept from north to south, first pounding Dallas and Fort Worth overnight. As the storms inched south and settled over central Texas and Austin, record amounts of rain - more than five inches in some areas of the capital - drenched areas that just a few months ago battled the most devastating wildfires the state had ever seen.
NEWS
September 30, 2011 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Pennsylvania environmental-advocacy group has come up with a plan to keep natural-gas drillers from bringing their rigs, trucks, pipelines, and noise into pristine state parks. The short version: Get them to pledge not to do it. John H. Quigley, former secretary of the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR), which manages the parks, thinks the drillers have an incentive. "Drilling in state parks is going to provoke public outrage," he said Thursday in announcing the plan, proposed by Citizens for Pennsylvania's Future and dubbed "Don't drill through the heart of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
August 18, 2011 | By Alan Scher Zagier, Associated Press
JOPLIN, MO. - Seniors and juniors are taking classes in a converted big-box store. Freshmen and sophomores are in a building across town. The new middle school is in an industrial park. Across Joplin, the schools are still a jumble, with books, computer monitors, and unassembled furniture littering unfamiliar hallways. But as classes resumed Wednesday, students and teachers welcomed the start of another year as a return to something normal - or what passes for normal in a city crippled last spring by the nation's single deadliest tornado in six decades.
NEWS
April 11, 2011 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
PORTLAND, Ore. - Philadelphia has already staked its claim as a player in the national craft beer movement, with dozens of local brewers producing top-notch beer. Could the newest wave in artisan drink rolling our way from the West Coast - the craft spirit movement - be the next obsession to slake Philly's thirst with potent shots of white corn "Shine" and "Petty's Island Rum"? It just might, if Rob Cassell of Philadelphia Distilling and James Yoakum of Cooper River Distillers realize their dreams.
NEWS
April 18, 2010 | By Chelsea Conaboy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Boeing needed space to set up a new modification facility for its huge Chinook helicopters. The Millville Airport had it: two massive, empty hangars not far from the company's Ridley Park site, where the Chinooks are made, or the Baltimore port, where many are loaded onto ships bound for the Middle East. For the company, the move into Cumberland County, celebrated with a ribbon-cutting and praise from politicians this month, just made sense. For Millville, which has an unemployment rate among the highest in South Jersey, Boeing could be a game-changer.
NEWS
January 8, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William C. Williams, 83, of Huntingdon Valley, a real estate broker and developer, died of complications from Parkinson's disease Sunday at St. Joseph's Manor in Huntingdon Valley. For 50 years, until retiring in 2003, Mr. Williams operated a brokerage firm in Northeast Philadelphia. In the early years, his daughter Susan said, he sold new homes and later expanded into commercial and industrial real estate with other investors. In the 1970s, he helped convert the former Quaker Rubber Plant in Wissinoming into an industrial park and was one of the first developers to build condominiums in Bucks County, his daughter said.
NEWS
February 19, 2005 | By Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dennis Flanagan was a skinny, long-haired 17-year-old when he pleaded guilty to the 1981 murder of a gay man in a Bensalem industrial park. But in July, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court granted him a new trial, and Flanagan, now a graying 41-year-old, returned to Bucks County Court this week to resume his bid for freedom. Witnesses had died and scattered. Evidence had been lost. Memories had faded. But Flanagan's murder retrial ultimately changed nothing. He still will serve life in prison.
NEWS
March 15, 2004
Along the banks of the Lehigh River in Bethlehem, a permanent tribute is taking shape to honor the immigrant workers who built America. Some well-meaning supporters are imperiling the effort, though, by grasping for a more grandiose monument before they have laid a proper foundation. The National Museum of Industrial History is to be built in a 37,000-square-foot building formerly owned by Bethlehem Steel Corp. Created in cooperation with the Smithsonian Institution, the museum promises to be the first forum in the nation dedicated to telling the story of the industrial laborers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
NEWS
September 28, 2003 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
What is good for Gloucester County is good for Maggie Smith. The decision this month by Jack & Jill Ice Cream Co. to relocate from Bensalem, Pa., to Logan Township's industrial park was good for her. So were the recent warehouse expansions in Logan, one by a distributor of health-care supplies, another by a restaurant supplier. And so was the groundbreaking this month for an industrial park in Glassboro, and the launching of eight small businesses. Officially, Smith is executive director of the county Department of Economic Development.
NEWS
September 6, 2002 | By Jake Wagman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In front of dozens of cheering residents, the Township Council unanimously adopted an ordinance that will restrict development near public drinking wells. Washington Township, one of the fastest-growing municipalities in the region, is the first in South Jersey to pass a so-called wellhead-protection measure. A resident who wrote the legislation compared it to a colonial proclamation that prohibited doing the "necessities of nature" within 20 feet of a well. "That is the same principle that applies today," Vicky Binetti told council members last night.
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