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Industrial Park

NEWS
July 18, 2002 | By Jake Wagman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Major corporations are clamoring to build on it, residents are against developing it, and a township official has a financial stake in it. The Cross Keys Industrial Park, among Washington Township's last vacant commercial sites, has become a too-hot property. It covers 162 acres between three major arteries: the Black Horse Pike, Hurffville-Cross Keys Road, and Fries Mill Road. In May, A.C. Moore, the 62-store arts-and-crafts chain founded in Moorestown, withdrew plans to move its headquarters there after vocal opposition from neighbors.
NEWS
July 7, 2002 | By Jake Wagman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Fearing a possible lawsuit, township officials have taken a step back from proposed environmental legislation. The ordinance, which would restrict development near wells, has provided a lesson in grassroots activism in a municipality where power and land are closely linked. Last month, the Township Council gave preliminary approval to the creation of six Wellhead Protection Overlay Districts. Those districts would create three concentric classifications around the area of wells that take water from the Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer, which in some places is as close as 20 feet to the surface.
NEWS
January 11, 2002 | By Chris Gray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Something about river towns has always attracted developer J. Brian O'Neill. As a teenager busing tables in his father's West Conshohocken restaurant, he admired the industrial architecture of the factories and warehouses strung along the Schuylkill. Then when the borough's manufacturing economy bottomed out in the late 1970s, he sympathized as former steelworkers begged for kitchen jobs. Now O'Neill, 42, is being credited as one of the people responsible for revamping Conshohocken from smokestack borough to white-collar suburb.
BUSINESS
October 19, 2001 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia tourism leaders estimated yesterday that the toll in lost tourist revenue from the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks was $47 million. The estimated losses were calculated by hotel and convention officials as they joined Mayor Street to give more details about the city's $3 million promotional campaign to lure out-of-towners back to the city. The campaign will feature two-night stays at area hotels for the price of one and free weekend parking for hotel guests. Since the slump in air and other travel after the hijackings, Philadelphia hotels lost more than 170,000 nights of occupied rooms.
NEWS
August 21, 2001 | By Kaitlin Gurney INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After a year and a half of redevelopment efforts and the publication of a slick promotional magazine, borough officials say the bustling college town they envision may be just a few more steps away. Tonight, the Borough Council is expected to approve an additional $1 million in redevelopment bonds to buy the historic Franklin House - an 18th-century inn where, it is said, George Washington slept - and a 1930s elementary school that Rowan University intends to turn into a business incubator.
NEWS
August 5, 2001 | By Jake Wagman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When the Montieth brothers started their sheet-metal industry in 1967, it operated out of a two-car garage in Stratford. Since then, P&M Industries Inc. has grown to a 75-employee company converting thousands of pounds of steel and other materials into employable forms, from vending machine coin boxes to power outlet strips. Last week, the company announced plans for further expansion, breaking ground on a 25,000-square-foot factory addition. P&M is one of several companies in West Deptford that seems to have withstood the effects of the economic downturn, expanding at a time that has forced companies elsewhere to freeze growth plans and lay off workers.
NEWS
July 26, 2001 | By Sara Isadora Mancuso INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
PAULSBORO ? A proposal recently released by the borough would turn a contaminated 130-acre parcel into a $92 million, money-making site for one of the poorest municipalities in the state. Under the plan by URS Corp. of San Francisco, the former site of the BP Exploration & Oil Inc. plant would become an industrial park, retail establishments and port area. A ribbon of trees and bushes would provide a buffer between the site and the surrounding neighborhood. An additional 60 acres of adjacent land, owned by Dow Chemical, are included in the proposal.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2001 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For a time in the 1990s, the Fort Washington Office Center was a forgotten place. The former industrial park, one of the first in the nation's suburbs when it was built in the 1950s, was rundown and obsolete, a victim of a slump in the commercial real estate market, a stagnant economy, and the resulting flight of industry from the park. But in recent years, the center has undergone a makeover. On a mission to reinvent itself, the Montgomery County complex is striving to make its veteran status an asset, not a liability.
NEWS
December 11, 2000 | By Kaitlin Gurney, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Nearly $1 million in computer chips has been stolen since November from two technology companies at the Pureland Industrial Park, and local police and the FBI have linked the thefts to resellers in Delaware and New York. In early November, Custom Edge, a subsidiary of the Compaq Computer Corp., reported to Logan police the theft of $661,000 in computer chips and other hardware. A few weeks later, Tech Data, which sells computer parts and servers to resellers, reported a theft of $198,000 worth of merchandise.
NEWS
August 9, 2000 | By Lee Drutman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Officials at USX Realty said yesterday they had signed a deal with an undisclosed developer to build a 500-megawatt gas-fired power plant here. "It's a community service, if you will, and it's nice for us because we will derive some lease income," said Dennis McCartney, USX Realty general manager. "It will mean jobs, but not thousands. It's good for the industrial park, good for the community, it's good for them and good for the area. This is the place where it belongs. " The place is 25 acres of USX's former steel-production plant, now an industrial park.
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