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Industrial Production

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BUSINESS
August 17, 1989 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Industrial production rose for the first time in three months in July while housing starts continued to rebound, the government said yesterday in reports regarded as further evidence that a recession will be avoided this year. The Federal Reserve said its industrial-production index last month stood at 141.7 percent of its 1977 base, compared with 141.4 percent in June. The 0.2 percent increase in July followed consecutive declines of 0.1 percent in May and June. Overall production was up 2.7 percent over a year ago. The Commerce Department said housing starts had risen in July for the second-straight month.
BUSINESS
January 18, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Production at the nation's factories, mines and utility companies rose slightly last month, the government reported yesterday, but analysts said the increase was caused mostly by special factors that masked underlying weakness in the manufacturing sector. The total industrial output rose 0.4 percent in December after a revised 0.3 percent gain in November, the Federal Reserve Board said. The increase over December 1988 was 1.7 percent. The report also said that industrial plants were operating at 83.3 percent of capacity, up from 83.1 percent in November.
BUSINESS
April 16, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Industrial production dropped 0.3 percent in March, the biggest decline in 10 months, as activity at American factories was depressed by a cut in auto production, the government reported yesterday. The Federal Reserve said the March decline, which followed a 0.5 percent February increase, was the biggest downturn in activity since a 0.4 percent drop in May 1986. However, a separate report yesterday indicated that in spite of the trend toward cutting production, businesses are feeling better about the future.
BUSINESS
September 16, 1995 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Production at American factories in August posted the biggest rise in eight months, raising doubts that the Federal Reserve will cut interest rates at its meeting this month. Yesterday's report showed that industrial production surged 1.1 percent last month, led by demand for electricity to power air conditioners and broad- based demand for cars and other manufactured goods. Analysts surveyed before the report had expected a rise of about 0.4 percent. The Fed also raised its estimate for July to a rise of 0.3 percent, up from its earlier estimate of a 0.1 percent rise.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1991 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Production at the nation's factories, mines and utilities slumped sharply in November, the Federal Reserve said yesterday in a report that gave fresh evidence of a stalled national economy. The Fed said that industrial production dropped 0.4 percent last month, and that nearly every major category of manufacturing activity contracted from October. "The recovery has ground to a halt," said economist Robert G. Dederick of the Northern Trust Co. in Chicago. "If anything, the industrial sector seems to be losing ground.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1996 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Business took a downturn this month at Philadelphia-area manufacturers, according to the latest regional Federal Reserve study. "Most future economic indicators fell noticeably this month, probably reflecting the widening consensus that economic activity will slow during the second half of 1996," the Philadelphia Federal Reserve Bank said. The bank's general economic index, compiled from a survey of 150 manufacturers in eastern Pennsylvania, southern New Jersey and Delaware, declined to 21.5 in August from 38.6 in July.
BUSINESS
November 16, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
Output at the nation's factories, mines and utilities shot up 0.6 percent in October, the biggest increase in three months, the government reported today. The report by the Federal Reserve Board showed that in the month the financial world was being pounded by the stock market collapse, industrial production was rising at a robust rate. More than half the increase was in auto production. The 0.6 percent overall increase followed no change in September and a 0.3 percent August advance.
BUSINESS
November 14, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Industrial production in October took its steepest plunge in nine months, the government said yesterday in a report that many economists contend is further confirmation of a recession. "Until now, the labor-market statistics clearly indicated a recession, and the consumer statistics - department-store sales, discretionary spending - clearly indicated a recession," said Michael K. Evans, head of a Washington economic-forecasting company. "But we sort of needed the third leg of the stool.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1994 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
American industry boosted production in April and kept running at the highest rate in nearly five years, the Federal Reserve Board said yesterday in a report viewed as a solid sign of economic strength. On the eve of what could be an important decision on interest rates, the Fed said industrial production rose 0.3 percent last month, following a 0.5 percent gain in March. Monthly output has now risen in an unbroken chain that started in June. The overall increase for April was tempered, however, by a decline in automotive production.
BUSINESS
February 16, 1991 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Two key indicators - for prices and industrial production - offered widely different pictures yesterday of the nation's economy in January. The government said that inflation at the wholesale level declined 0.1 percent in January, but that output at the nation's factories, mines and utilities fell 0.4 percent for the month. It was the fourth straight monthly drop in industrial output. The conflicting signals - that inflation appeared to be under control, but that manufacturing still was in a deep slump - plus uncertainty over events in the Persian Gulf probably will prompt the Federal Reserve Board to delay cutting interest rates again until the outlook becomes clearer, economists said.
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BUSINESS
February 17, 2013
In the Region Philly airport gets state cash   Philadelphia International Airport said Friday that it has been awarded a $5.1 million state grant to make upgrades to airport mechanical facilities and airfield taxiways. Gov. Corbett announced the grants to 10 Pennsylvania airports for safety enhancements and improvements. The funds, approved by the State Transportation Commission, came from the Pennsylvania capital budget. - Linda Loyd   AARP opposes utility plan   AARP Pennsylvania announced it will oppose changes approved Thursday by a unanimous Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission that it says will make default electricity service more volatile and costly.
BUSINESS
June 7, 2012 | Michael Armstrong
I'm calling for a cease-fire on overstating the importance of statistics, meetings, or events that suggest they may have some bearing on the end of the global economy as we know it. This week, commentators on the financial-news networks were still deconstructing the god-awful U.S. jobs report from Friday, which was weak but a far cry from the bad old job-destruction days of 2008. Some were viewing Tuesday's Group of Seven meeting as key to finding the secret passageway that would lead Europe out of the forbidding debt-crisis woods.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2012 | By Christopher S. Rugaber, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - U.S. factories boosted output last month, and December ended up being their best month of growth in five years. Strong auto sales and growing business investment in machinery and other equipment are keeping factories busy and helping the economy grow. The Federal Reserve said Wednesday that manufacturing production increased 0.7 percent in January. And in December, output soared 1.5 percent, according to an upward revision. That's the biggest one-month gain since December 2006.
BUSINESS
November 17, 2011 | By Daniel Wagner and Christopher S. Rugaber, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - U.S. manufacturing is recovering from a slump, and inflation may be peaking. Data issued Wednesday point to an economy growing slowly but steadily. Still, surging oil prices and a possible European recession threaten the momentum. "The continued resilience of manufacturing is encouraging, since this should be the sector most exposed to the global economic slowdown," said Paul Ashworth, chief U.S. economist with Capital Economics. Industrial production rose in October at the fastest pace in three months.
NEWS
June 12, 2011
Amity Shlaes is a senior fellow in economic history at the Council on Foreign Relations and a Bloomberg columnist What if it just keeps going? That's the question Americans are asking as they consider last month's 9.1 percent unemployment rate, still so high 33 months after the crash of September 2008. Scholars of economic history are asking another question: Are we repeating 1937? That year, when Americans were expecting their economy to finally pull out of the Great Depression, the stock market took another dive, with the Dow Jones industrial average dropping from the 190s in March 1937 to less than 100 in March 1938.
BUSINESS
July 16, 2010 | From Staff and Wire Reports
After driving the economic recovery over the last year, manufacturing activity is slowing, according to reports Thursday in Philadelphia and New York. A third report showed that factory production fell the most in a year, and yet another economic indicator - prices at the wholesale level - raised some worry about deflation. "Manufacturing has peaked, and factory output will moderate over the next few months," Ryan Sweet, senior economist at Moody's Economy.com in West Chester. In the Philadelphia area, manufacturing fell in July for the second consecutive month as the national economy stumbles through a soft patch, according to a monthly survey from the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 18, 2009 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As the H1N1 virus waxes and wanes among humans, health officials have stepped up scrutiny on a whole new population: pigs. Are swine somehow culpable, as genetic tendrils of the virus suggest? And does the way we raise them, on industrial farms, create the potential for future pandemics? The answers are maybe and maybe. In any case, pigs are paying the price. Thousands were scheduled for euthanasia abroad, and several countries banned the import of U.S. pork products, even though the illness is not food-borne.
BUSINESS
October 17, 2008 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Stock prices continued their stomach-churning gyrations yesterday, finally ending with big gains as oil's drop below $70 a barrel sparked interest in consumer-products companies. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 401.35, its 10th-largest point gain ever, to close at 8,979.26. The average rebounded from an early decline of 380 points that was spurred by a government report yesterday morning of the biggest drop in U.S. industrial production in 34 years. By the close, the Dow had swung by more than 700 points for the sixth straight day. "We have a manic-depressive market," said Frederic Dickson, chief market strategist at D.A. Davidson & Co., in Lake Oswego, Ore. "The speed at which markets are reacting to news right now is close to mind-numbing.
NEWS
January 2, 2008 | By Mark J. Perry
As the U.S. economy enters its seventh year of expansion, many are predicting a recession in 2008. Don't believe it. The U.S. economy is strong, healthy and stable, and it will continue expanding well into the new year. The National Bureau of Economic Research, the nation's leading authority on business cycles, closely watches five economic variables to determine when the economy officially goes into a recession. You might be surprised, but the bureau doesn't look at any of the economic variables that get all of the attention in the media, like the subprime crisis, the falling dollar, foreclosures, the stock market, and rising oil prices.
BUSINESS
October 15, 2005 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Hurricanes Katrina and Rita pushed consumer prices up and industrial production down last month by the most in about a quarter-century, the government reported yesterday. Prices paid by consumers jumped 1.2 percent in September, the biggest monthly increase since March 1980, as gasoline prices soared, the Labor Department said. Ninety percent of the increase came from a record-shattering 12.1 percent surge in energy prices, reflecting tight supplies after widespread shutdowns of refineries and of oil and natural-gas production along the Gulf Coast because of the storms.
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