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Infant Mortality

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NEWS
July 14, 1992
Even without our front-page picture of a swollen abdomen, Wednesday's story on infant mortality would have been shocking. Joanne Sills reported that Philadelphia's infants are dying at double the national average. The national average is nothing to be proud of, ranking us in the second tier in the world, behind most other industrialized nations. The infant mortality rate actually has decreased, but experts say this is due almost entirely to new technology, not healthier mothers.
NEWS
March 26, 1988 | By Robin Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
In Washington, the "Mom Mobile" plies the streets in poor neighborhoods as a rolling reminder of city services available to ensure that pregnant women have healthy babies. In New York, information tables at local welfare offices guide prospective mothers to an array of special programs set up in neighborhoods where poverty, ignorance, malnutrition and other factors combine to doom as many as 25 out of a thousand infants before their first birthday. The idea, in each case, is to wade into the jungle and slay the beast of infant mortality where it lives - in the poorest sections of America's largest cities.
NEWS
May 15, 1991 | By Walter F. Roche Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
With some trepidation, but no real choice, a group of city health officials and advocates are working to develop a proposal for a controversial grant program to reduce infant mortality in several low-income neighborhoods. The group, convened by Harriet Dichter, director of maternity and infant health programs in the city Health Department, faces a July 1 deadline to complete a grant application that could bring as much as $15 million over five years to the city, which has the fifth highest infant mortality rate in the nation.
NEWS
November 21, 2003 | By Maureen Fan INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Dr. Dalia Hatem was helping to deliver another woman's baby at Baghdad Teaching Hospital when the heat and noise became too much for her. Hatem went into premature labor. When the gynecologist saw her son for the first time last month, there were tears in her eyes. The baby, born at 35 weeks, had been crying - a tiny but healthy infant in an incubator - but as soon as he heard Hatem's voice, he quieted. "The stress of the labor room got to me, and I started to go into contractions," she said.
NEWS
June 22, 2010 | By HESHIMU JARAMOGI
PHILADELPHIA City Council recently held hearings on the issue of infant mortality. Many experts testified. A lot of important information was shared - much of which we've heard over the last 20 years. Let's review some of that data. There is a disparity in the rates of infant mortality affecting African-Americans and others in the city and state. West, Southwest and upper North Philadelphia have the highest rates of infant mortality, according to Melita Jordan, director of the state health department's bureau of family health.
NEWS
September 19, 1991 | By Larry Copeland, Inquirer Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this article
The Philadelphia Health Department will receive a five-year, multimillion- dollar federal grant to combat staggering infant mortality rates in West Philadelphia, officials said yesterday. Philadelphia, with an infant mortality rate that is annually among the nation's highest, is one of 15 areas that will share $25 million to start or improve programs that provide health care to pregnant women and infants. President Bush and Louis W. Sullivan, U.S. secretary of Health and Human Services, announced the "Healthy Start" program grants in Salt Lake City.
NEWS
April 13, 1991 | By WILLIAM RASPBERRY
The good news, the Department of Health and Human Services announced Monday, is that America's infant-mortality rate has taken its largest decline in a decade: down from 9.7 deaths per thousand in 1989 to 9.1 per thousand in 1990. The bad news is that the gap between blacks and whites remains essentially unchanged; black babies are still twice as likely as white babies to die during infancy. The persistence of the disparity must be a matter of particular chagrin for HHS Secretary Louis W. Sullivan, who has made known that one of his top goals is to reduce the inequality of health care available to blacks and whites.
NEWS
March 2, 1988 | By Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Mecah Odum just couldn't swallow her pre-natal vitamins. She tried, but each time she gagged. She had trouble with any-sized pill, but especially these horse tablets. Don't worry about it, nurse-midwife Michele Moloney advised the pregnant West Philadelphia teenager. Instead, take two chewable Flintstone's vitamins. The city Health Department has enlisted this down-to-earth approach to combat one of the scourges of childbirth here, an infant mortality rate that's among the highest in the nation.
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NEWS
December 2, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia did not fare well in a University of Pennsylvania analysis of the health status of pregnant women and newborns, especially among those who are African American. The city was consistently worse than the state and nation on measures of maternal and infant welfare, and well below national goals. "We've got to stop saying we're the best health care system in the world," said William McCool, a Penn nursing professor who led the analysis. The United Nations has put improving maternal health and child mortality among its eight Millennium Development Goals.
NEWS
May 17, 2013
Saving lives one infant at a time For public health nurses, it is no surprise that the city ranks fifth-highest among the nation's most populous counties in the rate of infants who died within 24 hours of birth ("City rates poorly in infant mortality," May 7). Staff at the Philadelphia Nurse-Family Partnership and its complimentary Mabel Morris Family Home Visit Program know firsthand the challenges low-income mothers face to have healthy pregnancies and healthy babies. These dismal infant-mortality rates did not happen overnight and are not going to go away with one approach.
NEWS
May 8, 2013 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia ranks fifth from the bottom of the more than 200 most populous counties nationwide on a key measure of infant mortality, the organization Save the Children is reporting Tuesday, another reminder of the overriding importance of poverty and race. Some other parts of the region don't fare well either. Camden County was No. 20 and Delaware County No. 22 in the analysis of infant deaths in the first 24 hours of life for 2007 through 2009. Among states, Delaware comes in fourth and Pennsylvania sixth (counting the District of Columbia as No. 1)
NEWS
October 18, 2012
By Farah Stockman Last week, my friend Andy, a hedge-fund guru, sent me a memo titled "Three Steps to Fiscal Solvency. " It was based on the premise that if America were a company, it would be in pretty bad shape. We spend far more than we take in. Our liabilities are mounting. Our assets are pretty much flat. Andy got rich thinking outside the box. So I wasn't entirely surprised to see his list of things that Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney - who made his fortune in private equity - might do to improve America's bottom line.
NEWS
January 12, 2012
By Mike Honda and Michael Shank Homicide, other violent crimes, incarceration, policing, and guns are costing this country hundreds of billions of dollars, and millions of jobs, every year. According to conservative estimates by the Institute for Economics and Peace, if the United States were on par with Canada on all five of those fronts, it could save $361 billion a year and add 2.7 million jobs. Given America's high debt and unemployment, it could certainly benefit from both.
NEWS
October 27, 2011
With so many renowned hospitals, there's no question that the region's vital health-care economy is anchored in its bricks-and-mortar buildings. But several hundred boosters who will gather Saturday at the Union League of Philadelphia will be honoring a record of 125 years of caring for patients by an organization that could be considered the Delaware Valley's largest hospital without walls. As the nation's second-oldest (behind Boston) in-home nursing group, the Visiting Nurse Association of Greater Philadelphia started with funding from a dozen women public-health pioneers.
NEWS
September 23, 2010
By Marian Tasco and Blondell Reynolds Brown One way societies measure their overall health and well-being is by the number of babies who die before their first birthday - the infant mortality rate. By this standard, Philadelphia is not doing very well, and African Americans in the city are faring terribly. Philadelphia's infant mortality rate in 2007 was 11.4 deaths per 1,000 live births, compared with Pennsylvania's rate of 7.4 per 1,000 and a U.S. rate of 6.8. The rate among blacks in Philadelphia was 15.9, which was close to twice that of whites, Asians, and Hispanics.
NEWS
June 22, 2010 | By HESHIMU JARAMOGI
PHILADELPHIA City Council recently held hearings on the issue of infant mortality. Many experts testified. A lot of important information was shared - much of which we've heard over the last 20 years. Let's review some of that data. There is a disparity in the rates of infant mortality affecting African-Americans and others in the city and state. West, Southwest and upper North Philadelphia have the highest rates of infant mortality, according to Melita Jordan, director of the state health department's bureau of family health.
NEWS
March 24, 2008 | By Walter Tsou
Philadelphia's African American infant mortality rate was 15 per 1,000 live births between 2003 and 2005. That's more than 50 percent higher than the white infant mortality rate of 9.9 per 1,000 live births. But there's more: Philadelphia's white infant mortality rate is almost 46 percent higher than the national average of 6.8. The picture gets even bleaker: The United States as a whole ranks about 30th in the world in infant mortality. Slovenia does better. Despite our city's world-class medical institutions, the chance for a Philadelphia infant to reach his or her first birthday is diminished.
NEWS
May 15, 2007 | By Beth Leianne Curtis
Last month, mothers, babies and birth advocates of all ages gathered at Chestnut Hill Hospital to rally in support of the hospital's labor and delivery department, which the hospital is considering closing. Chestnut Hill could become one of more than a dozen hospitals to close their doors to pregnant women in the Philadelphia area in the last decade. For many women, including myself, an apprentice midwife, this is a devastating trend. Chestnut Hill has had one of the lower cesarean-section surgery rates in the city, and it is the only hospital left in the city with private-practice midwives on staff.
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