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Inflammation

SPORTS
September 24, 2009 | By Andy Martino INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An alarming situation worsened yesterday when catcher Carlos Ruiz returned to Philadelphia to have his sprained left wrist examined. An MRI conducted by team physician Michael Ciccotti revealed no structural damage but showed inflammation, according to general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. The team will decide today whether Ruiz needs a cortisone shot, which would render him unavailable for three to five days. "It was actually good news, because there was no structural damage," Amaro said.
NEWS
May 18, 1990 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer wire services contributed to this article
Massive bacterial infections, such as the kind that killed Muppet master Jim Henson, are best treated with antibiotics and speed. But Henson evidently had passed the "point of no return" by the time he sought treatment, according to a professor at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP). Henson died Wednesday of a quick-spreading bacterial pneumonia. Robert Austrian, professor and chairman emeritus of the Department of Research Medicine at HUP, said yesterday that the bacteria, streptococcus, "can kill a patient rather quickly.
SPORTS
May 13, 1993 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This is perhaps the biggest reason these Phillies might not be flukes: When they need a well-pitched game, there's a fine chance they will get one. Last night, the Phils were coming off an ugly loss on Tuesday and anticipating a three-game weekend series in Atlanta, which can leave any team badly chopped. So Tommy Greene, despite a late-inning salvo of line drives, threw nine strong innings, limiting the Pittsburgh Pirates to five hits and a single run in a 4-1, rain-delayed Phillies' victory.
SPORTS
August 14, 1999 | By Jim Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Phillies have survived the losses of several key players and enjoyed what to this point has been a surprisingly successful season. Now comes the biggest challenge of all. One month to the day after starting for the National League in the All-Star Game, Curt Schilling was placed on the disabled list last night with inflammation in his right shoulder. The 32-year-old righthander, who has been plagued by this problem for more than a month, will return to Philadelphia today for concentrated therapy.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2003 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Johnson & Johnson said yesterday that it would acquire 3-Dimensional Pharmaceuticals Inc., of Yardley, in a cash deal valued at $88 million. The pharmaceutical and health-care products giant will pay $5.74 for each 3-Dimensional share, which closed at $5.64 yesterday on the Nasdaq stock market. The announcement sent the small company's shares soaring $2.61, or 86.1 percent, at yesterday's close. 3-Dimensional Pharmaceuticals has drugs in early-stage research for treating cardiovascular disorders, oncology and inflammation.
SPORTS
August 25, 2004 | By Bob Brookover INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Eagles casually announced yesterday that Corey Simon's trip to the foot doctor in Maryland on Monday revealed that the starting defensive tackle has plantar fasciitis and that he will not play in tomorrow's exhibition game against the Pittsburgh Steelers. An ominous development for a team already decimated by injuries? Not according to Mark Myerson, the foot specialist who treated Simon. "His foot was very inflamed," Myerson said last night by cell phone. "He'll be back in training next week.
NEWS
October 28, 2007 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was her first day back at work - a full slate of faculty meetings - and Lisa Mullenax might as well have been at home. That was where her mind was. She had spent the summer falling in love with her baby, Lucas, but now it was August, back to work to pay the mortgage. As the meetings droned on, the young teacher consoled herself that school was just two minutes away from home in State College, Pa. The baby was with his father, Alejandro Mendez Vargas, a tender spirit who was so good with Lucas that her mother teasingly called him "Mr. Mom. " It would be OK. But then, as Lisa was getting out supplies for her Spanish classroom, her return to daily routine suddenly crumbled.
SPORTS
July 25, 2014 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jonathan Papelbon stood at the base of the mound at Citizens Bank Park as Giants scurried around the bases Wednesday night. He did not flinch when Hunter Pence dunked a 93-m.p.h. fastball into short right field for the decisive hit in a 3-1 Phillies loss. He did not move to back up home plate, and Chase Utley's throw skipped past Carlos Ruiz and into the San Francisco dugout. "What are you going to do? I don't really worry about it," Papelbon said. "I try to prepare every day and do my best.
SPORTS
July 24, 2014 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
ON MAY 28 against the Colorado Rockies, Antonio Bastardo walked four of the five batters he faced. He was booed off the mound. (The Phillies still won the game.) Two years ago, on the day Ryan Howard returned from his Achilles' injury, Bastardo entered the eighth inning of a scoreless game against the Atlanta Braves. He walked in a run and then served up a back-breaking grand slam to Brian McCann. Those are the moments most people are able to recall when they think of Bastardo's role in the bullpen in the last few years.
NEWS
January 23, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: What causes my urine to have a lot of foam? Is it serious? Answer: Have you ever had lemon meringue pie? Those tall peaks of frothy white that make up meringue are made from two simple ingredients: sugar and egg whites. When whipped, egg whites will at first foam, and then stiffen into white peaks with continued beating. That's a result of the unique properties of the albumin protein of egg whites. It's normal to have a trace of protein in standing urine, which foams like meringue as the urine mixes with the water in the toilet.
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