CollectionsInflammation
IN THE NEWS

Inflammation

NEWS
May 18, 1990 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer wire services contributed to this article
Massive bacterial infections, such as the kind that killed Muppet master Jim Henson, are best treated with antibiotics and speed. But Henson evidently had passed the "point of no return" by the time he sought treatment, according to a professor at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP). Henson died Wednesday of a quick-spreading bacterial pneumonia. Robert Austrian, professor and chairman emeritus of the Department of Research Medicine at HUP, said yesterday that the bacteria, streptococcus, "can kill a patient rather quickly.
SPORTS
May 13, 1993 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This is perhaps the biggest reason these Phillies might not be flukes: When they need a well-pitched game, there's a fine chance they will get one. Last night, the Phils were coming off an ugly loss on Tuesday and anticipating a three-game weekend series in Atlanta, which can leave any team badly chopped. So Tommy Greene, despite a late-inning salvo of line drives, threw nine strong innings, limiting the Pittsburgh Pirates to five hits and a single run in a 4-1, rain-delayed Phillies' victory.
SPORTS
August 14, 1999 | By Jim Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Phillies have survived the losses of several key players and enjoyed what to this point has been a surprisingly successful season. Now comes the biggest challenge of all. One month to the day after starting for the National League in the All-Star Game, Curt Schilling was placed on the disabled list last night with inflammation in his right shoulder. The 32-year-old righthander, who has been plagued by this problem for more than a month, will return to Philadelphia today for concentrated therapy.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2003 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Johnson & Johnson said yesterday that it would acquire 3-Dimensional Pharmaceuticals Inc., of Yardley, in a cash deal valued at $88 million. The pharmaceutical and health-care products giant will pay $5.74 for each 3-Dimensional share, which closed at $5.64 yesterday on the Nasdaq stock market. The announcement sent the small company's shares soaring $2.61, or 86.1 percent, at yesterday's close. 3-Dimensional Pharmaceuticals has drugs in early-stage research for treating cardiovascular disorders, oncology and inflammation.
SPORTS
August 25, 2004 | By Bob Brookover INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Eagles casually announced yesterday that Corey Simon's trip to the foot doctor in Maryland on Monday revealed that the starting defensive tackle has plantar fasciitis and that he will not play in tomorrow's exhibition game against the Pittsburgh Steelers. An ominous development for a team already decimated by injuries? Not according to Mark Myerson, the foot specialist who treated Simon. "His foot was very inflamed," Myerson said last night by cell phone. "He'll be back in training next week.
NEWS
August 8, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
It's always important to eat wisely, even more so when you're sick. When it comes to cancer, however, researchers are discovering tantalizing new evidence that a patient's diet can actually help shrink tumors. Nicole Simone, a radiation oncologist at Thomas Jefferson University's Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center , has been studying the effect of diet on standard therapies such as radiation and chemotherapy to see whether what you eat can make a difference. So far, it appears that it does.
NEWS
August 26, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anyone who knows how rough cancer treatment can be may wonder about former President Jimmy Carter's decision to fight his melanoma with drugs and radiation - at 90. At his age, couldn't the treatment be worse than the cancer? Cancer experts say new ways of combating cancer - plus new ways of thinking about aging - are changing the equation when doctors evaluate the elderly for treatment. "Aging is an incredibly heterogeneous process," said Andrew Chapman, an oncologist at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital who runs a program that focuses on the special needs of geriatric cancer patients.
NEWS
April 18, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's good news and bad news on treating bug bites. First the bad news: Oral antihistamines such as Benadryl "are widely recommended to treat the itching associated with insect bites, but few studies have been found to support this," researchers write in April's Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin, a British medical journal. Topical antihistamines "are only marginally effective. " As for topical corticosteroids such as Cortaid, "no studies have been found to support their use specifically for insect bites.
NEWS
May 21, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Fox 29 reporter and anchor Chris O'Connell was alarmed to wake up Jan. 12 with blurry vision in his left eye. Nearly two months later, after Wills Eye Hospital physicians figured out what caused the problem, he was glad it happened. Turned out O'Connell had two undiagnosed heart defects, one of which probably led to a clot that blocked the blood supply to the optic nerve and retina in that eye. "In the beginning, I thought it was a devastating diagnosis," O'Connell said. "As I learned what exactly happened to me and why it happened, I felt almost like it was a blessing.
NEWS
December 30, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Bettemarie Bond is an overcomer. She went to college, worked full-time as an occupational therapist, and bought a house in Levittown, despite rare disorders that require her to have all nourishment and medication pumped round-the-clock into a vein in her heart. But last summer, when declining health forced her to go on disability at age 45, she faced a problem that floored her. Bond discovered that she would qualify for Medicare this month. Unlike the private health insurance she had through her job, however, the government insurer would not cover her costly intravenous therapy at home, only in a medical facility.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|