CollectionsInflammation
IN THE NEWS

Inflammation

BUSINESS
January 17, 2003 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Johnson & Johnson said yesterday that it would acquire 3-Dimensional Pharmaceuticals Inc., of Yardley, in a cash deal valued at $88 million. The pharmaceutical and health-care products giant will pay $5.74 for each 3-Dimensional share, which closed at $5.64 yesterday on the Nasdaq stock market. The announcement sent the small company's shares soaring $2.61, or 86.1 percent, at yesterday's close. 3-Dimensional Pharmaceuticals has drugs in early-stage research for treating cardiovascular disorders, oncology and inflammation.
SPORTS
August 25, 2004 | By Bob Brookover INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Eagles casually announced yesterday that Corey Simon's trip to the foot doctor in Maryland on Monday revealed that the starting defensive tackle has plantar fasciitis and that he will not play in tomorrow's exhibition game against the Pittsburgh Steelers. An ominous development for a team already decimated by injuries? Not according to Mark Myerson, the foot specialist who treated Simon. "His foot was very inflamed," Myerson said last night by cell phone. "He'll be back in training next week.
NEWS
April 6, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The plate at the restaurant in Beijing was laden with thin, yellowish sheets made from soybeans, called tofu skin. Peter Lelkes used them as the chef intended, to wrap vegetables into bite-size morsels. But as he ate, the biomedical engineer's thoughts strayed from the Chinese restaurant to his lab in Philadelphia. The tofu-based "skin," he realized, made him think of the real thing. A decade later, that chance encounter in a Chinese restaurant has led to a soy-based "skin substitute" - a wound dressing that a start-up company has licensed for use on diabetic ulcers, burns, and other injuries the body cannot readily heal on its own. Lelkes and his Temple University colleagues say the product has shown promise in animal studies, and the company, Eqalix in Reston, Va., is raising money to seek FDA approval.
NEWS
January 23, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: What causes my urine to have a lot of foam? Is it serious? Answer: Have you ever had lemon meringue pie? Those tall peaks of frothy white that make up meringue are made from two simple ingredients: sugar and egg whites. When whipped, egg whites will at first foam, and then stiffen into white peaks with continued beating. That's a result of the unique properties of the albumin protein of egg whites. It's normal to have a trace of protein in standing urine, which foams like meringue as the urine mixes with the water in the toilet.
NEWS
January 26, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Probiotics - live organisms naturally found in the human gut - have become a sensation in the supplement industry, with drugstores and supermarkets offering an array of capsules, pills, fermented foods, even cosmetics. These "good bacteria" and yeasts may help a variety of conditions, experts say, including digestive problems, vaginal infections, anxiety, atopic dermatitis in infants, and life-threatening side effects from taking antibiotics. But determining effective doses, figuring out which strains work for which conditions, and understanding the amounts of active ingredients in commercial supplements is far less clear.
NEWS
December 8, 2013 | By Joan Capuzzi, V.M.D., For The Inquirer
Auggie, a 11/2-year-old male Jack Russell terrier, presented to our clinic with muscle tremors. The owners first noticed the tremors the previous evening, when the dog appeared to have tripped on the stairs. Fine muscle tremors, primarily in the buttocks, were apparent on physical exam. The neutered dog showed no pain upon palpation of his spine and manipulation of his neck and limbs but seemed somewhat stiff. He was well hydrated and pulse was normal. "This is the calmest Jack Russell I've ever seen," I said several times, perhaps ominously.
NEWS
March 24, 2014 | By Dr.William B. McNamee Jr., For The Inquirer
Her three sisters brought her to the emergency room at Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital. For the last month she had been having increasing problems with thinking and she could no longer walk on her own. One month before, she was living independently with her daughter in Virginia, but now she looked to her sisters a lot like their elderly mother who died a few years ago of Alzheimer's disease. How could this happen almost overnight? In the emergency room, her vital signs were normal and she could tell the doctors the right place, month, and year.
NEWS
February 24, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Patients with eczema tend to start itching before they see a rash, rather than the other way around, leading some to call it "the itch that rashes. " So what is this invisible agent that causes the itch? Herbert B. Allen has been scratching his head over that one for years, but recently the Drexel University dermatologist achieved a measure of intellectual relief. He and a team of colleagues at Drexel's College of Medicine report that the culprit is a slime-like substance called biofilm, produced by Staphylococcus bacteria on the skin.
NEWS
December 2, 2013 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ross Martinson once felt invincible. One of those high-velocity land animals, he could run nearly forever and fast, finishing 23d in the Boston Marathon and three times in the top five of the Broad Street Run. Then, in 2008, he ran the Rock 'n' Roll distance run, finishing the half-marathon in 1 hour 6 minutes and 49 seconds. As he walked off the course, he felt some tightness in his calves. Two hours later, he was crippled with pain. "It felt like I was screwed up," he said with a runner's classic understatement.
NEWS
August 26, 2011 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Delaware County jury has ordered Riddle Memorial Hospital and two physicians to pay more than $3.8 million in damages to the husband of a 52-year-old Media woman after finding that the doctors were negligent in her death. Janice Heffner, the co-owner of an eyeglasses manufacturing business in Media, died of a blood infection on Oct. 26, 2007, 14 hours after she was admitted to the hospital with severe stomach pains attributed at first to constipation. In the suit, Heffner's husband, William Heffner 3d, argued that Lawrence P. Wean and John A. Kotyo failed to treat his wife with the urgency that her condition demanded after it became clear that she was getting sicker.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|