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Inflammation

NEWS
August 28, 2011 | By Ray Parrillo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the most part, ballplayers are a superstitious lot. That's why so many of them recoil when asked to explain a hot streak. It was no surprise, then, that Carlos Ruiz waved his hand and shook his head when someone broached the subject of his recent 11-game hitting streak, which ended Friday in the Phillies' 6-5 loss to Florida, their last game before Hurricane Irene washed out the rest of the series. "Sometimes you feel good at the plate, and sometimes you don't," Ruiz said Saturday.
SPORTS
August 17, 2011 | By Ray Parrillo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cole Hamels now knows why he couldn't get loose during his start Friday against the Washington Nationals. The lefthander had an MRI Monday, which showed inflammation in the posterior rotator cuff behind his left shoulder, and will miss his turn in the rotation Friday. It's uncertain when Hamels will make his next start. Hamels downplayed his condition, saying he's missing the start because dye was injected into his shoulder prior to the MRI. "I think because they had to inject dye and because it's very uncomfortable and it takes over 24 hours to come out, so I'm not supposed to throw for two days," Hamels said before the Phillies and Arizona Diamondbacks began a three-game series Tuesday at Citizens Bank Park.
SPORTS
August 17, 2011 | BY DAVID MURPHY, dmurphy@phillynews.com
WITH AN 8 1/2-game lead over the Braves in the NL East and a 13 1/2-game lead over the next-closest wild-card team, the Phillies entered last night with plenty of reason to err on the side of caution in their handling of their two biggest injury concerns. But both Ruben Amaro Jr. and Charlie Manuel emphasized that with 6 weeks of baseball left and a schedule laden with games against fellow contenders, they were not in a position to make postseason health a priority. The chief concern is Cole Hamels, who had a precautionary MRI on his throwing shoulder on Monday after a start against the Nationals in which his velocity was down 3-to-5 mph from its usual range.
SPORTS
July 16, 2011 | By DICK JERARDI, jerardd@phillynews.com
NEW YORK - They pass like ships in the night - the third baseman heads for the disabled list as the closer comes off it. It has been an ongoing theme for the team with the best record in baseball. Which begs the question: How many wins would they have if all those ships had never left port? Placido Polanco was placed on the 15-day DL with lower back inflammation yesterday, on the day Ryan Madson came off. "I'm probably about 90 percent now," Polanco said. "There's still some inflammation in the nerves, but it should get better.
NEWS
April 4, 2011 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: I have severe varicose veins and leg swelling that led to sores that haven't been easy to heal. I'm getting regular home health-care visits, but do you have any other suggestions? Answer: Try laughing several times a day. Yes, really! According to a new study in the British Medical Journal, good-quality nursing care and belly laughs are the best treatments for people who have severe leg ulcers caused by the breakdown of skin from the chronic inflammation and swelling of severe varicose veins.
SPORTS
March 6, 2011 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
CLEARWATER, Fla. - Chase Utley still can swing a bat, this much is sure. He stood at home plate in Bright House Field, lashing at every ball thrown his way during batting practice Saturday morning, even hitting one out of the park. A few feet behind the cage, Phillies general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. explained Utley's lack of progress in recovering from patellar tendinitis and the decision to administer a cortisone injection Friday. Utley kept swinging because his right knee doesn't hurt when stationary.
NEWS
June 2, 2010 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
A major study led by Cooper University Hospital suggests a new way to improve dismal survival rates after cardiac arrest: Turn down the patient's oxygen. Stinting on oxygen may seem counterintuitive, since the brain begins to die when deprived of oxygen-rich blood for more than five minutes. But studies in dogs and in premature infants have long shown that too much oxygen can be harmful. The new study, published in Wednesday's Journal of the American Medical Association, is the first solid evidence that this vital gas is also a double-edged therapy after the heart suddenly stops - as it does in 220,000 Americans every year.
SPORTS
September 24, 2009 | By Andy Martino INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An alarming situation worsened yesterday when catcher Carlos Ruiz returned to Philadelphia to have his sprained left wrist examined. An MRI conducted by team physician Michael Ciccotti revealed no structural damage but showed inflammation, according to general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. The team will decide today whether Ruiz needs a cortisone shot, which would render him unavailable for three to five days. "It was actually good news, because there was no structural damage," Amaro said.
SPORTS
March 19, 2009 | By Jim Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Having survived one of Philadelphia International Airport's infamous delays Tuesday night, Cole Hamels returned to Phillies camp yesterday and quickly endorsed Brett Myers for opening-night starter. That is, if Hamels himself can't answer the call. Although pitching coach Rich Dubee has called Hamels a long shot to start against Atlanta in 17 days, the Phillies' ace believes he can do it. "I love long shots," said the 25-year-old lefty, who is being treated for soreness and inflammation in his left elbow.
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