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Inflammatory Bowel Disease

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NEWS
September 23, 2011
Horsham-based Janssen Biotech Inc., received approval from the Food and Drug Administration to sell Remicade for the treatment of children over age six who suffer from moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis and haven't responded to other medicine. Remicade is made at a plant in Malvern. Between 50,000 and 100,000 U.S. children have inflammatory bowel disease, of which 40 percent have ulcerative colitis.    - David Sell  
NEWS
June 5, 1991 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
In sports, Philadelphia has never had a year like 1980. The Phillies won the World Series, the 76ers went to the NBA finals and the Flyers went to the Stanley Cup finals. Then in January 1981, the Eagles traveled to the Super Bowl. It was a heady time for sports fans and sportscasters. For Don Tollefson, then sports anchor at WPVI-TV (Channel 6), it was a championship season he'll never forget. It was also his last year before Crohn's Disease became a part of his vocabulary.
NEWS
November 20, 1987 | By GLORIA CAMPISI, Daily News Staff Writer
The state Health Department will expand its investigation into recent deaths at Mercy Catholic Medical Center's Fitzgerald Mercy Hospital to include a surgical death there in January. Gary Froseth, a spokesman for the Health Department, said Harriet A. Parsons, 49, of Clifton Heights, died in the Darby hospital on Jan. 9. She bled to death when a vein was cut during bladder surgery, according to records in the Delaware County medical examiner's office. The medical examiner's office declared Parsons' death due to "therapeutic misadventure.
NEWS
January 29, 1990 | Marc Schogol from reports from Inquirer wire services
HAPPILY EVER AFTER? Just because you've been married a long time doesn't mean you'll stay married forever. The divorce rate for men 55 to 59 rose 10 percent, and for women the same age it increased 8 percent between 1980 and 1986, says Barbara Foley Wilson of the National Center for Health Statistics. Notes Carlfred B. Broderick, head of the University of Southern California sociology department: "In general, people at any adult age prefer being married, but now the older ones aren't intimidated by any social requirement to have a spouse.
NEWS
November 18, 1987 | By KIT KONOLIGE, Daily News Staff Writer
A five-month-old infant died at Mercy Catholic Medical Center's Fitzgerald Mercy Hospital earlier this month of an overdose of medicine - the second accidental death at the hospital within in a four-day period. Tyhisha Smith, of Chestnut Street near 33rd in West Philadelphia, died at the Darby hospital at 5:53 a.m. on Nov. 4 after being given an overdose of an asthma medicine. A doctor "administered excess aminophylline due to faulty preparation of intravenous solution," said investigator Duane Minshall of the Delaware County medical examiner's office, reading from the death certificate.
LIVING
January 31, 2000 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Your mother probably won't agree, but some scientists think people in industrialized countries are too clean. That's right. Too clean, too worried about germs. Put away that antibacterial soap. Let your kids play barefoot in the dirt. Use antibiotics sparingly. The idea is that humans evolved over millions of years in a dirty environment. Billions of bacteria live in our guts and they always have. In fact, there are more bacteria in our bodies than cells. Until relatively recently, almost everybody had worms.
NEWS
February 10, 1992 | By Kimberly J. McLarin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Michael Psichos is 16 and has a chronic, debilitating disease that has been a pain in his gut since he was 10 years old. It is ulcerative colitis, a hidden, largely unknown disease even though it afflicts about 2.5 million Americans - more, experts say, than cystic fibrosis, muscular dystrophy and hemophilia combined. It can be messy and excrutiatingly painful, frightening, depressing and embarrassing. Psichos has experienced all of this. But yesterday he stood, sharp-witted and smiling, before a crowd of children and parents facing what he has faced and told them to struggle on. "Sometimes, when you're in the hospital, the one thing you want to do is give up," Psichos said.
SPORTS
May 22, 2010 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Columnist
There's no statistical record of the stormy night when Katie Gill knew her remarkable recovery was complete. Officially, that May 14 tournament game between Washington Township and Howell never happened. For the Minutemaids, it was a washout. For Gill, it was a breakthrough. "That's when I knew I was back to being me," said Gill, who plays attack for Washington Township. Gill, a junior, scored six goals in the first half, although none of them counted when rain and lightning forced the South Jersey Group 4 lacrosse game to be replayed in its entirety the next day. Still, there was a moment at halftime when Gill knew had she finally ?
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NEWS
June 24, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Colonoscopies are a familiar, if somewhat disagreeable, part of life for those over 50. But at St. Christopher's Hospital for Children, physicians Harpreet Pall and Elizabeth Maxwell found younger patients were not always prepared to undergo the invasive exam. So the doctors decided to start giving instructions to their patients in a kid-friendly medium: a comic strip. The result, which they commissioned from a professional artist and writer, is a colorful, one-page primer titled "Bowel Prep?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2012
Special Events A Night of Urban Farming and Astronomy Tour the Teens 4 Good Farm & learn about the night sky. Teens 4 Good Farm, 800 Poplar St. 4/27. 6 pm. Annual Spring IBD Education Day Health specialists will explore aspects of living with Crohn's disease & ulcerative colitis, inflammatory bowel disease. Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, 111 S. 11th St. 4/29. 9 am-1 pm. Annual Wissahickon Creek Clean Up Help clean the Creek, enjoy a picnic afterward.
NEWS
September 23, 2011
Horsham-based Janssen Biotech Inc., received approval from the Food and Drug Administration to sell Remicade for the treatment of children over age six who suffer from moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis and haven't responded to other medicine. Remicade is made at a plant in Malvern. Between 50,000 and 100,000 U.S. children have inflammatory bowel disease, of which 40 percent have ulcerative colitis.    - David Sell  
SPORTS
May 22, 2010 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Columnist
There's no statistical record of the stormy night when Katie Gill knew her remarkable recovery was complete. Officially, that May 14 tournament game between Washington Township and Howell never happened. For the Minutemaids, it was a washout. For Gill, it was a breakthrough. "That's when I knew I was back to being me," said Gill, who plays attack for Washington Township. Gill, a junior, scored six goals in the first half, although none of them counted when rain and lightning forced the South Jersey Group 4 lacrosse game to be replayed in its entirety the next day. Still, there was a moment at halftime when Gill knew had she finally ?
NEWS
May 21, 2010 | By Phil Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There's no statistical record of the stormy night when Katie Gill knew her remarkable recovery was complete. Officially, that May 14 tournament game between Washington Township and Howell never happened. For the Minutemaids, it was a wash out. For Gill, it was a breakthrough. "That's when I knew I was back to being me," said Gill, who plays attack for Washington Township. Gill, a junior, scored six goals in the first half, although none of them counted when rain and lightning forced the South Jersey Group 4 lacrosse game to be replayed in its entirety the next day. Still, there was a moment at halftime when Gill knew had she finally ?
NEWS
April 7, 2002 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Ralph Kuncl, a physician and researcher in the field of neuromuscular diseases who also has a background in education, has been named provost of Bryn Mawr College. Kuncl lives in Baltimore, where he is vice provost for undergraduate education at Johns Hopkins University. He will take the post at Bryn Mawr in June, when he will replace Robert Dostal, who plans to return to teaching in the college's philosophy department. Kuncl, the first physician to be named to the position, is also a professor of neurology and pathology at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.
LIVING
January 31, 2000 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Your mother probably won't agree, but some scientists think people in industrialized countries are too clean. That's right. Too clean, too worried about germs. Put away that antibacterial soap. Let your kids play barefoot in the dirt. Use antibiotics sparingly. The idea is that humans evolved over millions of years in a dirty environment. Billions of bacteria live in our guts and they always have. In fact, there are more bacteria in our bodies than cells. Until relatively recently, almost everybody had worms.
NEWS
November 25, 1995
PROPERTY OWNERS SHOULD PAY TO FIX WATER RUNOFF Stephen Kunz's Nov. 18 letter ("Save our natural resources from special interests"), about lax enforcement of environmental regulations and the sacrifice of natural resources by special interests, was on target. The latest example of such laxity and environmental sacrifice is Cherry Hill Township's proposed Kingston Estates flood-control project. The project will waste $3.4 million in public tax dollars to solve what is largely a private-property problem.
NEWS
August 27, 1992 | By Marc Schogol, with reports from Inquirer wire services
HONEY, I SAVED THE KIDS "Not in my back yard - I've got kids. " That's the No. 1 reason that people oppose siting of landfills in their communities, researchers at Pennsylvania State University and the University of New Hampshire report. Their study of the NIMBY (not-in-my-back-yard) syndrome found that the probability of such behavior's being displayed by a family with no children was just 23 percent but that for a family with children, it increased to 52 percent. And the bigger the family, the stronger the objection.
NEWS
February 10, 1992 | By Kimberly J. McLarin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Michael Psichos is 16 and has a chronic, debilitating disease that has been a pain in his gut since he was 10 years old. It is ulcerative colitis, a hidden, largely unknown disease even though it afflicts about 2.5 million Americans - more, experts say, than cystic fibrosis, muscular dystrophy and hemophilia combined. It can be messy and excrutiatingly painful, frightening, depressing and embarrassing. Psichos has experienced all of this. But yesterday he stood, sharp-witted and smiling, before a crowd of children and parents facing what he has faced and told them to struggle on. "Sometimes, when you're in the hospital, the one thing you want to do is give up," Psichos said.
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