CollectionsInflation
IN THE NEWS

Inflation

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 26, 2011
By Michael Silverstein Washington's big new idea for keeping Social Security solvent, while saving the government about $300 billion over 10 years, is something called the "chained CPI. " It could soon replace the standard measure of inflation - the consumer price index, or CPI - long used to keep seniors' real-world benefits from being whittled away by price increases. The new yardstick would virtually guarantee that future Social Security cost-of-living adjustments will be smaller than if the standard CPI were used.
NEWS
November 30, 1989
If there's one thing Lettie Gay Carson has learned in all her years of fighting for improved public transportation in central Bucks County, it's patience. After nearly a decade of lobbying to restore train service between Fox Chase in Northeast Philadelphia and Newtown, where the 88-year-old Ms. Carson lives (and thrives, we might add), she's still waiting to savor an elusive victory. It baffles her, as it does us, why there's been so little progress on electrifying the rail line between Fox Chase and Newtown, which would make service possible with SEPTA'S Silverliner cars.
NEWS
July 8, 1988 | By Robert J. Samuelson
"The Federal Reserve's job is to take away the punch bowl just when the party gets going. " - William McChesney Martin, chairman of the Federal Reserve Board, 1951-70. The party's going just fine. Indeed, it's time to take away the punch bowl. Since World War II, the worst mistakes in economic policy have occurred when prosperity seemed strongest. Modest inflation was allowed to get out of hand. Fighting it then required high unemployment and prolonged economic stagnation. The lesson: A pre-emptive strike against inflation makes sense.
NEWS
May 8, 1995 | by Randolph Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Savers who want some protection against inflation should think about real estate. With living costs rising only 3 percent a year, inflation may hardly seem a concern. But most people remember the 1970s, when inflation breached 13 percent, causing prolonged stock and bond losses. Inflation comes in cycles, so a period of rapid price hikes isn't out of the question in the future. This could knock the stuffing out of bonds and blue-chip stocks, which typically make up the lion's share of retirement savings.
NEWS
March 2, 1989 | By ROBERT J. SAMUELSON
It's important to practice what you preach. George Bush and his economic lieutenants say they want to encourage long-term economic thinking. The President should heed his own advice and stop heckling the efforts of Federal Reserve chairman Alan Greenspan to curb inflation. Combatting inflation is a classic case of doing something difficult today for much larger benefits tomorrow. The President disclaims any fight with Greenspan. Maybe. But Bush's complacency about inflation amounts to the same thing.
NEWS
July 17, 1995 | BY JOHN KENNETH GALBRAITH, New York Times
The Fed's reduction of one set of interest rates marked the beginning of the end of Alan Greenspan's war on inflation. The war began in February 1994 with the Fed's quarter-point increase in the rates that banks charge one another for overnight loans and led to a doubling of those rates, to 6 percent from 3 percent. It is not quite over yet. The financial markets expect further cuts. The war was phony. So was the enemy. Despite nonstop fretting by Greenspan, the Fed's chairman, no serious evidence of accelerating inflation ever emerged.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1991 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Despite a robust 0.7 percent increase in December, Americans' incomes failed to keep up with inflation last year, government figures showed yesterday. The Commerce Department said incomes grew 6 percent in 1990 to $4.65 trillion, after having advanced 7.7 percent in 1989. At the same time, inflation, measured by the Labor Department's Consumer Price Index, jumped 6.1 percent. December's gain in incomes reflected the fact that workers put in longer hours at higher pay levels.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2011
Inflation is a tax on our wallets. We're paying about $4 a gallon (or more) for gasoline, about as much for a gallon of milk, and feeling the effects of post-Civil War-high prices for cotton at clothing stores. Instead of fearing inflation, why not embrace it in your portfolio? Let's examine ways to play the trend and make money from inflation, specifically via exchange-traded funds. One of the chief ways to wager on rising inflation used to be by buying TIPS (Treasury Inflation Protected Securities)
BUSINESS
February 13, 2013 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
We investors follow the markets closely, but we shouldn't focus solely on the headline stock and bond market returns. What truly determines the soundness of our investments are the "real returns" generated by our portfolios after inflation and taxes. What's a real return? Investors usually fixate on nominal pretax returns (a.k.a. total returns), but we have to live on the money generated by our "real" returns, which is what we earn and take home after paying capital-gains taxes and accounting for inflation.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1991 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Fighting inflation should remain the international community's biggest economic goal despite the recession in several large industrial countries, a world banking organization said yesterday. The Bank for International Settlements, which acts as a central bank to the world's central banks, dismissed the Bush administration's call for major countries to lower interest rates to spark economic growth. The bank said that taming inflation was more important than acting hastily to overcome recession.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 10, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the great debate over why health care costs so much, some have pointed to inflated hospital charges, while others say those sticker prices don't really matter. What is clear, however, is that Southeastern Pennsylvania has a significant cluster of high-price-tag hospitals. Of the 50 hospitals in the nation with the highest markups over cost, six are in the city and its surrounding counties, according to an analysis published Monday; a seventh is 50 miles north. Only Florida, with 20 hospitals on the list scattered around the state, had more than Pennsylvania.
NEWS
April 2, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
  In 2011, artist Russell Buckingham painted two murals at the Risoldi family mansion near New Hope. One, in the dining room, showed their opulent home amidst ancient ruins, he said. The other, filling the domed ceiling of the house's entryway, depicted family members clad in robes and floating in the clouds. According to Buckingham, he was paid $50,000 for his work. Three years later, he said, the family matriarch, Claire Risoldi, told him that insurance companies were looking into how she spent their payouts after a 2013 fire at the home.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Inflation is making a comeback - although the Federal Reserve doesn't think so - prompting us to determine how we might hedge against it, or benefit from rising prices. Witness higher prices everywhere: at the grocery for meat and coffee, at the gasoline pump, rents, even health care. Invest in companies that benefit from rising prices, such as exchange-traded funds Market Vectors Agribusiness ETF (MOO) that correspond to the price and yield of the Market Vectors Global Agribusiness Index.
BUSINESS
June 2, 2014 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Is inflation good or bad? You'll hear it both ways, and the answer rests largely on whether you're talking about national economies or individuals and families, big borrowers or big spenders, you or me. At Marketplace.org , there's an excerpt from a book by senior editor Paddy Hirsch that seeks to explain in simple terms why some inflation is a good thing. In the excerpt, a shop owner raises prices for his limited supply of candy when a family of 10 children moves into his small town.
BUSINESS
May 27, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
FormDs.com helps keep tabs on growing businesses, hedge funds, and private-equity firms. One shop we noticed on its radar is Hirtle, Callaghan & Co., the West Conshohocken investment advisory firm that pioneered the "outsourced chief investment officer. " Hirtle Callaghan supervises $24 billion for families, endowments, foundations, pension funds, and health-care organizations. Rather than pick stocks, it picks portfolio managers and allocates capital. Jonathan J. Hirtle, cofounder and chief executive officer, confirmed that his shop has a number of new vehicles, such as Hirtle Callaghan Special Opportunities SPC Closed-End Segregated Portfolio.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2013 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Now that investors know Janet Yellen is the nominee for chair of the Federal Reserve, they can breathe a little easier. Take it from someone who actually met the nominee. Terry Sheehan, an analyst with the economic research firm Stone & McCarthy of Princeton, covers Federal Reserve policy and policymakers, the ISM Non-Manufacturing Index, and New York and Philadelphia Fed manufacturing indexes. Sheehan met Yellen last year at a conference and said that not only does Yellen represent continuity in the Fed's low-interest rate and bond-buying policy, but her reputation as a dove is overdone.
NEWS
July 3, 2013 | Harry Gross
D EAR HARRY: I'm having a problem with my husband and our three children. We have just moved to a retirement community (we're both 78). We had a discussion about our resources. Our pensions fortunately cover our costs at the retirement community and then some. We have accumulated savings (other than in pensions and IRAs) of a little more than $1 million. Our children are all well-situated financially. My husband and the children want us to transfer $200,000 to each child now. They want to "improve their living standards" as well as reduce the inheritance tax that would be due upon our deaths.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2013 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Gold prices just wrapped up their worst quarter - down 23 percent - since at least 1920, according to Bloomberg News. The shiny metal, valued at $1,227.05 an ounce Friday, has lost its glow, for now. What's going on with gold? The decline "is feeding on itself," according to experts cited in this article at CNBC's Market Insider. Writer Patti Domm quotes a list of those experts who note that factors affecting gold's decline include a slowdown in gold-buying by China and India, shattered confidence that gold's rise in value would continue unabated, and the failure of predictions, going back years, that inflation was about to take off. Gold could fall below $1,000 an ounce, according to an investment specialist who, it should be pointed out, has made financial bets that will pay off if gold continues to decline.
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
Philanthropic giving is inching its way back up, but the United States has not returned to its prerecession levels of generosity. Total 2012 giving to charities was $316.23 billion, up by 3.5 percent over 2011, according to estimates to be unveiled at the Union League on Wednesday. They were prepared by the Chicago-based Giving USA Foundation and the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. Adjusted for inflation, that represents just a 1.5 percent increase in donations from individuals, corporations, and foundations.
NEWS
May 24, 2013 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
An attendance clerk at Woodrow Wilson High School filed a lawsuit Wednesday in Superior Court in Camden County alleging attendance inflation by her superiors and the Camden School District. Roxanne Garrett also accuses former Wilson principal Tyrone Richards of sexual harassment and creating a hostile work environment. Richards did not return calls for comment Wednesday. In a six-page complaint, Garrett describes a district with an "everyone should fear for their job" mentality.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|