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Influenza

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NEWS
May 18, 1990 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer wire services contributed to this article
Massive bacterial infections, such as the kind that killed Muppet master Jim Henson, are best treated with antibiotics and speed. But Henson evidently had passed the "point of no return" by the time he sought treatment, according to a professor at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP). Henson died Wednesday of a quick-spreading bacterial pneumonia. Robert Austrian, professor and chairman emeritus of the Department of Research Medicine at HUP, said yesterday that the bacteria, streptococcus, "can kill a patient rather quickly.
NEWS
April 30, 2009 | By Regina Weiss
Peach Bottom Township is engaged in a showdown with state officials over a proposed factory hog farm. Since 2007, the York County community has been fighting a local family's plan to turn its 400-hog farm into a 4,400-hog concentrated animal feeding operation, also known as a CAFO or factory farm. Opponents believe animal waste from the facility would contaminate local wells, pollute the air, and lower property values, among other concerns. Based on the experience of other farm communities, their worries are well-founded.
NEWS
April 3, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
The intrepid sun has finally beaten the frost into reluctant retreat. The croci have gathered enough confidence to venture their tender shoots outside the earth's blanket. After months of hibernation, you step outside to take a deep breath of warm, sweet, fresh air and ... Hack. Wheeze. Gasp. Shiver. Moan. Back to bed you go. Influenza B, the annual spring flu, is on the rise. With its cruel sense of timing, the virus has hit the Delaware Valley - and the nation - with slightly more virulence than usual.
NEWS
November 29, 1990 | DAILY NEWS WIRE SERVICES
The deadly dozen - diseases that normally are not lethal if treated early, but that are killing poor blacks: Appendicitis, pneumonia, gall bladder infection, hypertensive heart disease, asthma, cervical cancer, tuberculosis, Hodgkin's disease, rheumatic heart disease, acute respiratory disease, influenza, and hernia.
NEWS
October 11, 1987 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
Free influenza immunization shots will be offered at various sites this month and in early November. The shots are provided by Adult Health Screening Services of the Camden County Health Division and by the Burlington County Department of Health. In Camden County, a flu shot will be administered to anyone who wishes to receive one. In Burlington County, however, the immunization is only for the chronically ill or for people over the age of 65 because influenza poses the greatest threat to people in these two groups, according to Dennis Del Rossi, the supervising field representative for disease control for the Burlington County Health Department.
NEWS
February 9, 1993 | By James Cordrey, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Montgomery County Health Department is investigating the outbreak of a flu-like illness among participants at an equestrian trade show held at the Valley Forge Convention Center from Jan. 30 to Feb. 2, health officials said yesterday. The health department has received 20 calls from exhibitors who said they were experiencing high fevers, chills, severe coughing, chest pains and coughing up of fluids. About 8,000 people attended the Equestrian Marketing Trade Association show, convention center officials said.
NEWS
August 23, 2010
Robert M. Chanock, 86, a virologist who made a remarkable series of discoveries about respiratory viruses in the 1960s and 1970s, including the isolation of the deadly respiratory syncytial virus and four para-influenza viruses, died Aug. 4 of Alzheimer's disease at a care center in Sykesville, Md. Dr. Chanock also identified the cause of what was once called walking pneumonia, developed an adenovirus vaccine widely used by the military, laid the...
NEWS
March 18, 2003 | By Seth Borenstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
As new cases of a mysterious and sometimes fatal Asian respiratory disease surfaced yesterday in Europe, health officials said they still did not know what they were fighting but believed it was something new. If it had been seen before or common, "we would have found it by now," said Julie Gerberding, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "We are confident that we will be able to find the cause. " The disease, which is being called Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, or SARS, may be an unusual virus-and-bacteria combination, two top experts said.
NEWS
December 30, 1992 | by Sue Ellyn Scaletta, Special to the Daily News
The last thing you need is some kind of bug nibbling at your holiday spirits. But the holidays are just when we may be most vulnerable to colds and their nastier cousins in the influenza family. "People tend to be stressed out on activities, eating the least nutritious kinds of foods and mixing in a lot of big crowds," said Fred Heer, director of the North Dakota Health Department's disease control division. All of which increases our exposure to the airborne viruses that cause colds and flu - and lowers the body's resistance to them.
BUSINESS
December 14, 2006 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Just two years after Novavax Inc. relocated its corporate headquarters from Columbia, Md., to Malvern, the vaccine developer announced yesterday that it was moving back to Maryland. Novavax, which is developing experimental vaccines for avian influenza, said the move would consolidate Novavax's Malvern operations with those already in Maryland in a new 50,000-square-foot research and development building in Rockville. In September 2004, when Novavax moved corporate offices to Chester County, it kept its vaccine operations in Maryland.
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BUSINESS
October 28, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
The international reshuffling of pharmaceutical products and businesses continued Monday when the Swiss firm Novartis resumed its exit from vaccines by selling its influenza vaccine to Australia's CSL Ltd. CSL will pay Novartis $275 million for the flu vaccine and operate the business through its bioCSL subsidiary. Novartis' influenza vaccine had $527 million in sales in 2013. CSL Behring, another subsidiary, operates from King of Prussia. The unit makes plasma protein medications used to treat conditions such as hemophilia, von Willebrand disease, primary immune deficiencies, and hereditary angioedema.
NEWS
April 3, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
The intrepid sun has finally beaten the frost into reluctant retreat. The croci have gathered enough confidence to venture their tender shoots outside the earth's blanket. After months of hibernation, you step outside to take a deep breath of warm, sweet, fresh air and ... Hack. Wheeze. Gasp. Shiver. Moan. Back to bed you go. Influenza B, the annual spring flu, is on the rise. With its cruel sense of timing, the virus has hit the Delaware Valley - and the nation - with slightly more virulence than usual.
NEWS
March 20, 2013 | BY ADAM ZAKHEIM, For the Daily News
DESPITE THE decades-long fight against influenza, it's still a killer. This flu season, Pennsylvania health officials have confirmed more than 170 influenza-associated deaths. Nationally, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported outbreaks of influenza across the country, and estimated deaths soared from prior years. The severity of this year's epidemic underscores the importance of getting a yearly flu shot, which protects against the flu. But it also exposes the fact that every year the U.S. Food and Drug Administration gambles on you and the flu. Each year in the United States, influenza infection results in an estimated 31 million outpatient visits, 226,000 hospitalizations, and 36,000 deaths.
NEWS
January 11, 2013 | By Bob Salsberg, Associated Press
BOSTON - Boston declared a public-health emergency Wednesday as flu season escalated and the state reported 18 flu-related deaths so far. The city is offering free flu vaccines and hopes to set up places where people can get vaccinated. The city said there had been four flu-related deaths, all elderly, since the unofficial start of the flu season Oct. 1. "The best thing you can do to protect yourself and your family is to get the flu shot," Mayor Thomas Menino said. The city was experiencing its worst flu season since at least 2009, Menino said, with about 700 confirmed cases, compared with 70 reported all of last season.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2013
As the flu runs rampant, we sorted through some smartphone applications meant to help track, avoid and treat influenza and other common illnesses. If you are really sick, consult a health professional. HealthMap: Outbreaks Near Me , from John Brownstein, is free for Android and Apple. From a team at Boston Children's Hospital, this app uses a variety of data sources, including the World Health Organization, Google and EuroSurveillance, to map health alerts all over the world.
NEWS
December 20, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a run of topsy-turvy influenza seasons that included one pandemic and another with almost no flu, the new cough-and-cold season has arrived abruptly and in force. Across the country, influenza-like illnesses are showing up at their earliest point in nearly a decade. Locally, pediatric hospitals are already experiencing some of their highest emergency-room volumes since the peak of the pandemic three years ago. What is typically a one-two punch - various early-winter viruses followed by late-winter influenza - may be emerging in the Philadelphia region as simultaneous rises in the respiratory infection RSV and flu. Both hit young children hard.
NEWS
August 23, 2010
Robert M. Chanock, 86, a virologist who made a remarkable series of discoveries about respiratory viruses in the 1960s and 1970s, including the isolation of the deadly respiratory syncytial virus and four para-influenza viruses, died Aug. 4 of Alzheimer's disease at a care center in Sykesville, Md. Dr. Chanock also identified the cause of what was once called walking pneumonia, developed an adenovirus vaccine widely used by the military, laid the...
NEWS
May 4, 2009 | By Art Carey, Don Sapatkin, and John Sullivan INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Gov. Rendell announced yesterday Pennsylvania's first confirmed case of swine flu after receiving the test results of a 31-year-old Mexican man who had recently arrived in Montgomery County to work as a landscaper. The man, who has a work visa, was met on Wednesday by his American sponsor, who recognized his symptoms and took steps to get him immediate treatment, Rendell and health officials said at a late-afternoon news briefing in Norristown. The case proved to be mild, and the man recovered without hospitalization.
NEWS
April 30, 2009 | By Regina Weiss
Peach Bottom Township is engaged in a showdown with state officials over a proposed factory hog farm. Since 2007, the York County community has been fighting a local family's plan to turn its 400-hog farm into a 4,400-hog concentrated animal feeding operation, also known as a CAFO or factory farm. Opponents believe animal waste from the facility would contaminate local wells, pollute the air, and lower property values, among other concerns. Based on the experience of other farm communities, their worries are well-founded.
BUSINESS
December 14, 2006 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Just two years after Novavax Inc. relocated its corporate headquarters from Columbia, Md., to Malvern, the vaccine developer announced yesterday that it was moving back to Maryland. Novavax, which is developing experimental vaccines for avian influenza, said the move would consolidate Novavax's Malvern operations with those already in Maryland in a new 50,000-square-foot research and development building in Rockville. In September 2004, when Novavax moved corporate offices to Chester County, it kept its vaccine operations in Maryland.
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