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Information Technology

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NEWS
July 9, 2014
A story Tuesday on e-cigarettes misstated the profession of Jeff Cullaton, a customer at a vape store. He works in information technology.
NEWS
November 25, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor-elect Jim Kenney's latest wave of announcements mean that his administration's top people on money matters will bring plenty of experience with Philadelphia's finances, in good times and bad. Kenney said Monday that he will retain Rob Dubow as chief financial officer, and put budget director Rebecca Rhynhart in a new post in charge of overseeing procurement, information technology, and human resources. Kenney also said that Sheila Hess, director of foundation and community affairs for Independence Blue Cross, will serve as city representative, and Harold T. Epps, vice chairman of the regional company PRWT Services, will be his commerce director.
BUSINESS
October 25, 2000 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania's economy, which for years was shackled by Rust-Belt industries, caught the high-tech wave in the late 1990s as job growth and revenue in computer-related companies soared. In fact, corporate hiring in computer programming and data processing was the fastest-growing job category in Pennsylvania between 1997 and 1999 - beating out the state's recent high-growth industries: low-wage restaurants and personnel agencies. That is the evidence from a new report on the state's economy from Pennsylvania State University.
BUSINESS
July 29, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Staff Writer
Tech innovation, higher productivity, and zealous competitiveness in the global arena are the keys to improving the U.S. economy. They are also the hot-button money issues that should be pushed in the 2016 presidential campaign, rather than the time-honored arguments for lowering taxes, shrinking government, and reducing regulations. So argues the nonpartisan Information Technology and Information Foundation whose leadership is split evenly between Republican and Democratic leaders. And at a meeting Wednesday in the Kimmel Center, IT&IF president Robert Atkinson found the agenda endorsed by several members of the U.S. House of Representatives, a major drug industry leader, a Harvard Business School professor, and well-placed executives from Microsoft, Amazon, and Facebook, all in town for the Democratic National Convention.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2012
Peggy A. Ireland has been promoted to vice president, leasing, at Whitesell Construction Co. Inc. , Delran. She had been senior leasing manager. P. Timothy Phelps has been hired as executive director of the Transportation Management Association of Chester County , Malvern. He had been president of the TriCounty Area Chamber of Commerce in Pottstown, Pa., where he also was executive director of the subsidiaries the Pottstown Area Industrial Development Corp. and the TriCounty Area Chamber of Commerce Foundation.
NEWS
December 28, 2014 | By Joseph H. Kanter, For The Inquirer
Even at the age of 91, I can write an opinion piece for this newspaper in about an hour. Data from respected institutions and researchers show that the following things occur in the U.S. during each hour. Sixty-eight people die from heart disease, our number-one cause of mortality for more than 75 years. Sixty-five succumb to cancer, our number two killer during the same decades. Twenty-seven women are found to have breast cancer, and eighteen of them will get treatments that don't work.
NEWS
August 23, 2011
AGE: 55 JOB: Now acting superintendent, Philadelphia School District. SALARY: $230,000 EDUCATION: Education: B.A., Lafayette College, 1977; M.B.A, Washington University, 1979; Ed.D., University of Pennsylvania, 2003. FAMILY: Married with three children. PHILA. SCHOOL DISTRICT: As deputy superintendent, Nunery had wide responsibility, overseeing facilities, procurement, human resources, information technology, and new schools. OTHER EXPERIENCE: Spent 16 years in corporate banking, and four years with the NBA as a vice president.
NEWS
February 25, 2011 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
No canaries work for CDI Corp., the $926.3 million Center City company that serves as a temporary-staffing service for companies that need engineers and information technology specialists. But they may as well. Because, just as the canary signals trouble in the mine shaft, CDI's financials sing out what's next in the economy. Their song? An economy on the mend, but slowly. CDI's harbinger status derives from the fact that just more than half its revenue comes from putting engineers to work.
BUSINESS
May 21, 1998 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that 1.3 million new information science technology workers will be needed through 2006. Pennsylvania State University has a plan to make sure a lot of them are its graduates. A Penn State committee has unanimously recommended creating a School of Information Sciences and Technology to make sure its students are prepared for the 21st century. The plan must be approved by trustees. But Penn State president Graham Spanier has told them he believes establishing the school would be a milestone for the university.
NEWS
August 16, 2006 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dianah Neff, Mayor Street's hand-picked chief information officer and driver of the city's Wireless Philadelphia program, will leave City Hall next month to become senior partner at a technology consulting firm to which she steered city work. Street yesterday appointed Neff's deputy, Terry Phillis, to succeed her as acting technology chief. Neff's primary role at the Georgia firm, Civitium, will be to increase its business overseas. "Dianah's experience as a major-city CIO, background in the private sector, and pioneering leadership with Wireless Philadelphia make her ideally suited to lead Civitium's growing business outside the U.S.," the firm's founder and managing partner, Greg Richardson, said in a statement yesterday.
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BUSINESS
August 16, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Latest in an occasional series about recruiters The employees that advertising agencies want most don't exist. Employers want digital strategists with 10 to 12 years' experience, "but they aren't going to find anyone, because the field hasn't been around that long," said advertising recruiter Ginger Kochmer. "There's a shortage of good talent," said Kochmer, who leads the Creative Group in Philadelphia, a specialty recruiting agency within Robert Half International, the worldwide human resource consulting firm.
BUSINESS
July 29, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Staff Writer
Tech innovation, higher productivity, and zealous competitiveness in the global arena are the keys to improving the U.S. economy. They are also the hot-button money issues that should be pushed in the 2016 presidential campaign, rather than the time-honored arguments for lowering taxes, shrinking government, and reducing regulations. So argues the nonpartisan Information Technology and Information Foundation whose leadership is split evenly between Republican and Democratic leaders. And at a meeting Wednesday in the Kimmel Center, IT&IF president Robert Atkinson found the agenda endorsed by several members of the U.S. House of Representatives, a major drug industry leader, a Harvard Business School professor, and well-placed executives from Microsoft, Amazon, and Facebook, all in town for the Democratic National Convention.
NEWS
January 4, 2016 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
What will 2016 bring in the way of medical advances? As president and CEO of Philadelphia's University City Science Center, an incubator of medical research, Stephen Tang has an uncommon vantage point on that question. He predicts gene therapy, an experimental technique that uses genes to treat or prevent disease, and health information technology will boom this year. He spoke to us recently about the center and what lies ahead.   Tell us more about the Science Center.
NEWS
November 25, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mayor-elect Jim Kenney's latest wave of announcements mean that his administration's top people on money matters will bring plenty of experience with Philadelphia's finances, in good times and bad. Kenney said Monday that he will retain Rob Dubow as chief financial officer, and put budget director Rebecca Rhynhart in a new post in charge of overseeing procurement, information technology, and human resources. Kenney also said that Sheila Hess, director of foundation and community affairs for Independence Blue Cross, will serve as city representative, and Harold T. Epps, vice chairman of the regional company PRWT Services, will be his commerce director.
NEWS
December 28, 2014 | By Joseph H. Kanter, For The Inquirer
Even at the age of 91, I can write an opinion piece for this newspaper in about an hour. Data from respected institutions and researchers show that the following things occur in the U.S. during each hour. Sixty-eight people die from heart disease, our number-one cause of mortality for more than 75 years. Sixty-five succumb to cancer, our number two killer during the same decades. Twenty-seven women are found to have breast cancer, and eighteen of them will get treatments that don't work.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2014
SCA , a global hygiene and forest products company with Americas headquarters in Philadelphia, hired Carrie Harcus as consumer marketing director for U.S. and Canada. She had been senior business director-traditional food service in Campbell's North America Foodservice division. Webster Bank named Scott Meves senior vice president, commercial banking, and regional president for the Philadelphia area. Meves will be based in Radnor. He had been senior vice president and group manager at Brown Bros.
NEWS
July 9, 2014
A story Tuesday on e-cigarettes misstated the profession of Jeff Cullaton, a customer at a vape store. He works in information technology.
NEWS
February 18, 2013 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Turn on the 46-inch LED flat-screen in a room at the Borgata Hotel Casino and Spa, and an array of options will pop up on the TV. Among the choices: Shopping . Movies. Nightclubs . And starting Monday: In-room gaming . Borgata will become the first casino in the United States to offer E-Casino - gambling via television in the privacy of its guests' hotel accommodations. "When you're just trying to relax, having a hard time sleeping, or have time to kill before dinner, it would be fine to do," mused Joanne Piccione of Danbury, Conn., who was working a $2 slot machine last week during a three-night stay at Borgata to celebrate her 66th birthday.
BUSINESS
December 13, 2011 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
With the better part of three weeks to go in 2011, I've received far fewer holiday cards than business surveys about what 2012 will bring. Perhaps no one's feeling very festive after this hard slog of a year. The business forecasts are far from jolly. Their tone is one of continued caution and littered with the U-word - uncertainty. While I think it's far more important to follow what people and businesses do rather than what they say they'll do, it can be useful to scan the results of such surveys for possible trends.
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