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NEWS
August 10, 2007
LAST WEEK'S collapse of the I-35 West Bridge in Minneapolis was the latest in a series of infrastructure failures that have served to raise awareness and concern on the part of the public, the media and our government. In Manhattan, a steam pipe exploded, resulting in one death and countless dollars of lost productivity when a section of the city was shut down for public safety. In Texas, continual infrastructure failures at oil and gas facilities disrupt energy supplies at a time our country can least afford them.
NEWS
August 7, 2007 | By David Schultz
The I-35W bridge that collapsed into the Mississippi River in Minneapolis on Wednesday brought to home how all of us live in Minnesota. We saw a stranded school bus that fell with the bridge, and we worried about our children. Millions of us, even if we were not on that bridge, could identify with the victims. Suddenly, we thought about all the bridges we crossed every day and wondered if they were safe. Or were they going to crash someday as we sped across them? Minnesota also brought to us an old word with a new, sad currency: infrastructure.
BUSINESS
July 21, 2012 | By Patrick Walters and Associated Press
The economies of the nation's cities are starting to bounce back from the recession and grow again, but state and federal governments must increase their spending on infrastructure to help that growth continue, according to the U.S. Conference of Mayors, which released an economic report Thursday. The report, prepared by IHS Global Insight, forecasts that 300 of the country's 363 metropolitan areas will undergo real economic growth by the end of the year. The total gross metropolitan product grew by 1.7 percent last year and expanded in 267 metropolitan areas.
NEWS
January 9, 2009 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
As Congress prepares to wrangle over President-elect Barack Obama's still-undetermined economic-stimulus proposal, Gov. Rendell and other top state and local officials nationwide are pressing the need for infrastructure investment. Rendell, California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, and New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg yesterday announced results of an online poll in which a wide majority of Americans said they "strongly" or "somewhat" supported paying higher taxes to improve infrastructure.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's infrastructure has not improved since 2010, and the ongoing deterioration of its bridges and the near-failing condition of its roads remain a major economic problem for the state, according to a report card released Wednesday by the American Society of Civil Engineers. The state's overall grade remained stuck at C-minus, but there was some optimism among speakers at a news conference that Pennsylvania's new transportation-funding law would start turning conditions around.
NEWS
March 12, 1990 | By GEORGE F. WILL
On March 9, 1832, a 23-year-old candidate for the Illinois General Assembly told Sangamon County voters "my sentiments with regard to local affairs. " His first sentiment was "the public utility of internal improvements," particularly "the opening of good roads (and) the clearing of navigable streams. " Thus did Abraham Lincoln's public life commence with concern about what is now called "infrastructure. " Today Transportation Secretary Samuel Skinner, from Illinois, has the challenging task of selling a taxaphobic nation on the rationality of spending much more on infrastructure.
BUSINESS
February 22, 1988 | By Neill A. Borowski, Inquirer Staff Writer
Some growing communities in the Philadelphia region are beginning to look like an 8-year-old child in a 4-year-old's clothing. While their vacant land can accommodate expansion, their roads, sewers and other services are straining under the burden, says economist Joel L. Naroff of Fidelcor in his regional outlook report. If those facilities aren't improved, future economic expansion could be choked off, he contends. "Unless action is taken to begin the long process of expanding water, sewer, trash disposal and transportation capacity, long-term economic growth could be suppressed in later years," Naroff says of the eight-county area.
BUSINESS
June 23, 1986 | By Richard Burke, Inquirer Staff Writer
Large sections of the Philadelphia area's infrastructure - the roads, bridges and transportation and water-supply systems that support the economy - are falling apart and $10.5 billion is needed to halt the deterioration, a new study reports. Unless there are large infusions of capital, the region's commerce and the residents' quality of life could be seriously harmed, crippling the area in its competition with cities like New York, Boston and Baltimore, the study says. Years of deferring maintenance have led to most of the problems, and the study says that the area will need huge increases in taxes, tolls and other fees to make up for that neglect.
BUSINESS
March 20, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The roads, dams, water systems, airports, and other underpinnings of the nation's economy are in sorry shape, the American Society of Civil Engineers said Tuesday. But not quite as sorry as four years ago, when ASCE last evaluated the country's infrastructure. The engineers' quadrennial report card graded 16 sectors from aviation to wastewater. Overall, America's infrastructure got a D+, a step above "poor" but shy of "mediocre. " In 2009, the nation's infrastructure got a D. Solid-waste treatment got the highest grade, a B-, and the nation's railroads were most improved, moving up from a C- to a C+. Worst off were the nation's levees and inland waterways: Each got a D- from the engineers' group.
NEWS
July 19, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
WILMINGTON - While criticizing Congress for not passing a long-term transportation spending plan, President Obama stood before the closed I-495 bridge Thursday and announced a new initiative to encourage private-sector investment in infrastructure. "First-class infrastructure attracts investment, and it creates first-class jobs," Obama said. "Unfortunately right now, our investment in transportation lags behind a lot of other countries'. " The president's push for transportation improvements comes as the federal Highway Trust Fund is set to run out of money.
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NEWS
June 28, 2016 | By Charles Krauthammer
"I believe in an America always moving toward the future. " - Hillary Clinton, June 21   This was not the most important line in Clinton's Ohio economic policy speech, only the most amazing. Surely there cannot be a more vacuous, meaningless piece of political rhetoric. Every terrestrial entity from nematode to the United States of America moves forward into the future quite on its own, thank you. Where else is there to go? To be fair, however, spouting emptiness is tempting when you have the impossible task of running as the de facto incumbent in a ragingly "change" year.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
Bring up self-driving cars and Pennsylvania's transportation secretary gets enthusiastic. Leslie Richards is just as excited about using apps to understand traffic, installing smart signs to shrink gridlock, or getting rid of registration stickers. In a state where ancient infrastructure and dense development can make big transportation projects impossible, Richards likes thinking about high-tech solutions to old problems. "In some ways we're forced to really look at technology," she said, "but I welcome that.
NEWS
April 11, 2016
ISSUE | ENERGY Pipelines mean jobs "A Pipeline for Growth," a report by the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce, is a practical blueprint for natural-gas infrastructure development that will ensure Pennsylvania's economic future. The report outlines the economic benefits of creating infrastructure to brand Philadelphia as the next global energy hub. Building pipelines to transport natural gas and natural-gas liquids will: Spur an energy and manufacturing boom benefiting the regional economy.
NEWS
April 2, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
Peco Energy Co. said Thursday that its 1.6 million customers last year experienced the shortest average outage duration and second-fewest number of outages in company history, which it attributed to a ongoing program of infrastructure improvements, including the installation of smart meters. The Philadelphia utility reported fewer than one outage per customer last year - the 0.72 outage rate was second only to the 0.69 outages reported in 2013. The average outage duration was 84 minutes, a record.
NEWS
March 8, 2016 | By Betsy E. Huber
F ield of Dreams , the iconic 1980s movie, coined the phrase, "If you build it, they will come. " As it pertains to energy infrastructure, Pennsylvania needs to follow the same philosophy. Not long ago many were concerned about the cost and availability of much-needed energy resources. Gas crept north of $4 a gallon and some residents in the Northeast, including Pennsylvanians, felt the effects of propane shortages during cold winter months. With the development of the Marcellus shale in Western Pennsylvania, we have an opportunity to play a major role to ensure increased access to affordable, clean-burning energy resources.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gov. Wolf's environment secretary chaired the inaugural meeting of the Pennsylvania Pipeline Infrastructure Task Force on Wednesday in Harrisburg, assuring the natural-gas industry that the panel's job was not to create "a whole new set of regulations" and suggesting that a positive result could "ensure this industry's social license to operate. " John Quigley, secretary of the state Department of Environmental Protection, called the 48-member task force "an opportunity to assert national leadership, to demonstrate how this resource can be developed in a way that achieves environmental, business and community win-wins.
BUSINESS
April 23, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Obama administration announced a broad plan to modernize the nation's energy infrastructure Tuesday in Philadelphia, where an aging system of pipes, wires, rails, and waterways is struggling to adapt to a dramatically shifting energy environment. A delegation headed by Vice President Biden visited the city to unveil the initial installment of the Quadrennial Energy Review, which focuses on how to transform the nation's energy transmission, storage, and distribution infrastructure.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Obama administration has given SEPTA about $87 million to protect transit properties from future storms, officials said Monday. The $86.7 million grant from the Federal Transit Administration's emergency relief program will be used for seven projects: Railroad embankment and slope stabilization, $18.7 million. To stabilize and harden slopes along a series of 19th century railroad cuts in Montgomery and Delaware Counties used by the Warminster, West Trenton, Lansdale/Doylestown, and Media/Elwyn Regional Rail lines.
NEWS
July 19, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
WILMINGTON - While criticizing Congress for not passing a long-term transportation spending plan, President Obama stood before the closed I-495 bridge Thursday and announced a new initiative to encourage private-sector investment in infrastructure. "First-class infrastructure attracts investment, and it creates first-class jobs," Obama said. "Unfortunately right now, our investment in transportation lags behind a lot of other countries'. " The president's push for transportation improvements comes as the federal Highway Trust Fund is set to run out of money.
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