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Inheritance

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NEWS
October 5, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
RIBERA, N.M. - Anna Nupson lit another Marlboro Smooth as she sat in the garage that doubles as her office. The cluttered folding table beside her white Jeep is a makeshift desk. She smokes half a pack a day here, on an idyllic 40-acre ranch in the New Mexico plains - land she purchased using inheritance money from her family's tobacco business, John Middleton Inc. The A Star M Ranch is sprawling, with its horses and alpaca, glass-enclosed artwork, and sparkling chandeliers. But an overwhelming anxiety pushes Nupson away from the opulence and into the garage.
BUSINESS
December 22, 2014 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Getting an inheritance, even a small one, offers financial opportunities and risks. Don't blow it, most experts say. But how, since being named a beneficiary is a rare event in most of our lives? Drawing on an interview with financial adviser Jason Flurry, Bankrate.com writer Judy Martel says many people jump into risky investments with inherited money - a move that could sweep away a windfall. "Many heirs don't know how to handle a windfall and end up no better off than they were before," Martel writes.
NEWS
January 7, 1994 | By Maureen Graham and John Way Jennings, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
If he hadn't been shot to death and dumped in the Pinelands on Dec. 27, William Kelly stood to inherit money - perhaps more money than the South Philadelphia drifter had seen in his 31 years. That's because just 10 days before Kelly's slaying, his ailing father died, leaving an estate estimated at $120,000. A 1988 will bequeaths Kelly's brother and sister $1 each and gives the rest to Kelly. Since Kelly is dead, such an inheritance would ordinarily be passed along to his children - including the daughter of Margaret "Peggy" Kosmin, the woman who is now accused of killing Kelly.
NEWS
April 20, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
What are you going to do with all your stuff ? Baby boomers amassed serious assets during their lifetimes. Say you want to leave your children and grandkids some personal belongings - art, furniture, books, sterling silver and collectibles. Often that's done through a will. But it's best to have "the talk" while you're alive. Perhaps more than one child wants something with memories: mom's cookie jar, dad's pipe, or grandma's overstuffed chair. Welcome to an inheritance minefield.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2011 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: My parents are in their mid-60s. They're retired and having a wonderful time, which I'm very happy about. Recently I was visiting them and, out of nowhere, my mother said, "I hope you kids know your father and I aren't going to be leaving you anything when we die. Our legacy to you was raising you well and loving you the way we do. " I wasn't sure what to say, so I made some nondescript response to see if she would continue, but she...
NEWS
May 13, 1994 | by Kathy Sheehan, Daily News Staff Writer
Ervin Hornick always had been a frugal, distant and eccentric character. He never married and lived most of his 92 years with his parents and single siblings in Kensington. Sometimes, when relatives came to visit on holidays, he would leave the house rather than be sociable. He was also a bit of a cheapskate. When Hornick's sister died about five years ago, he complained about having to buy a dress to bury her in. And he didn't want to spend any money to go to lunch with his surviving relatives after her funeral.
NEWS
March 14, 1988 | By DAVE RACHER, Daily News Staff Writer
State divorce courts are barred from considering a spouse's possible inheritance as a factor in the distribution of marital property. The state Superior Court last week ruled a Lancaster County court "abused its discretion in including the possibility of the inheritance as a factor in making equitable distribution. " In that case, a woman testified her ex-husband's parents had said they planned to leave him half of their estate, estimated "in the neighborhood of $300,000, $400,000.
NEWS
September 30, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie said Monday that he would not consider raising the state's tax on gasoline unless lawmakers pared back other levies, though he didn't endorse a specific plan. Christie's transportation commissioner has said the state will run out of money for road, bridge, and rail projects in July. "I will consider any option that's presented to me as long as those options include tax fairness for the people of New Jersey," Christie said Monday morning at a breakfast in Morris County hosted by the Commerce and Industry Association of New Jersey.
NEWS
July 30, 2006 | By Rita Giordano and Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Remember those headlines of the 1990s that suggested baby boomers would reap a mega-windfall of trillions of dollars - one of the largest intergenerational transfers of wealth in history? As many are learning, it's not quite panning out that way. A recent AARP study based on 2004 federal data has found that nearly 81 percent of boomers - the oldest of whom are turning 60 this year - have yet to receive an inheritance, and less than 15 percent expect to ever get one, down from more than 27 percent in 1989.
NEWS
August 30, 2003
There ought to be a law against what happened to Ronnie Mich, the 61-year-old autistic man from Camden County who was robbed of his $1.2 million inheritance. In fact, New Jersey State Sen. Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester) plans to introduce a bill this fall that could be just such a safeguard. It would give the state Superior Court oversight over administration of estates - accountability that is sadly absent now. Executors would have to post a bond to the court and provide accountings of all assets twice a year until the final accounting.
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NEWS
April 7, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - For the second consecutive fiscal year, the Christie administration and the Legislature's chief budget officer offered similar revenue projections, portending a smooth budget process even as the governor and Democrats fight over initiatives like a proposed constitutional amendment to mandate pension funding for public employees. During much of Gov. Christie's tenure, the state's revenue estimates proved to be overly optimistic, leaving the state to scramble near the end of the fiscal year to balance the budget, as required by the New Jersey constitution.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
The sins of the father are visited on the children - and then some - in the provocative documentary What Our Fathers Did: A Nazi Legacy . A study in guilt, shame, acceptance, and denial, David Evans' sobering film tracks Philippe Sands, a human-rights lawyer and a Jew whose family was riven by the events of the Holocaust, as he meets and travels with two septuagenarian sons of high-ranking officers of the Third Reich. One, Hans Frank, was tried and sentenced to death at the Nuremberg trials; his son, Niklas, struggles with the knowledge that the DNA of "the butcher of Poland" courses through his blood.
NEWS
October 5, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
RIBERA, N.M. - Anna Nupson lit another Marlboro Smooth as she sat in the garage that doubles as her office. The cluttered folding table beside her white Jeep is a makeshift desk. She smokes half a pack a day here, on an idyllic 40-acre ranch in the New Mexico plains - land she purchased using inheritance money from her family's tobacco business, John Middleton Inc. The A Star M Ranch is sprawling, with its horses and alpaca, glass-enclosed artwork, and sparkling chandeliers. But an overwhelming anxiety pushes Nupson away from the opulence and into the garage.
NEWS
September 30, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie said Monday that he would not consider raising the state's tax on gasoline unless lawmakers pared back other levies, though he didn't endorse a specific plan. Christie's transportation commissioner has said the state will run out of money for road, bridge, and rail projects in July. "I will consider any option that's presented to me as long as those options include tax fairness for the people of New Jersey," Christie said Monday morning at a breakfast in Morris County hosted by the Commerce and Industry Association of New Jersey.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
And the Houston millions? Celebs, including Oprah Winfrey , Wendy Williams , Dr. Phil , and Missy Elliott mourned the death Sunday of Bobbi Kristina Brown , 22, who had been in a medically induced coma since being found unresponsive in a bathtub in her Roswell, Ga., home on Jan. 31. Her illness and death are something of a mystery. An autopsy is in the works, but an official cause of death may not be available for weeks, the Fulton County Medical Examiner said on Monday.
NEWS
April 20, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
What are you going to do with all your stuff ? Baby boomers amassed serious assets during their lifetimes. Say you want to leave your children and grandkids some personal belongings - art, furniture, books, sterling silver and collectibles. Often that's done through a will. But it's best to have "the talk" while you're alive. Perhaps more than one child wants something with memories: mom's cookie jar, dad's pipe, or grandma's overstuffed chair. Welcome to an inheritance minefield.
BUSINESS
December 22, 2014 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Getting an inheritance, even a small one, offers financial opportunities and risks. Don't blow it, most experts say. But how, since being named a beneficiary is a rare event in most of our lives? Drawing on an interview with financial adviser Jason Flurry, Bankrate.com writer Judy Martel says many people jump into risky investments with inherited money - a move that could sweep away a windfall. "Many heirs don't know how to handle a windfall and end up no better off than they were before," Martel writes.
NEWS
July 18, 2014
I HATE "urban music," whether it's rap, hip-hop, gangsta or whatever else they're calling it these days. The brutal assault on my ears and my dignity (Beyonce, honey: Jay Z and your gynecologist should be the only ones gazing at . . . that) makes me wonder what Langston Hughes, James Baldwin and Zora Neale Hurston would think of the trashy mess. When I wrote something similar a few years ago, I got called a lot of things that would fit right in with an urban melody. I also, predictably, was labeled a racist because, as everyone knows, you cannot malign rap, etc., without also wanting to repeal the 13th Amendment.
NEWS
February 16, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Theirs is not the kind of medical history anyone wants. The grandchildren of George Melling hope others can learn from the trail of death and damaged hearts that runs through their family tree. Four cousins - the children of two of George's daughters - died decades ago when their hearts stopped suddenly. Two were teenagers; another was 22 years old. When one of the mothers developed heart problems, a Johns Hopkins University doctor began looking for inherited heart defects in other family members and readily found them.
NEWS
January 17, 2014 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
WHEN OFFICER Gennaro "Gerry" Pellegrini Jr. became the first Philadelphia cop to lose his life while serving in the Iraq War in 2005, the badge he wore, which belonged to his father before him, was retired. Today, that badge - No. 3722 - will be called out of retirement and placed on the chest of Pellegrini's first cousin, Gregory Kravitz, who will graduate as an officer from the Philadelphia Police Academy this morning. Kravitz's mother, Denise, was proud of her son's decision to become a cop. Her brother, Gennaro Pellegrini Sr., served more than 25 years on the force and her husband, Officer Howard Kravitz, has almost 24 years with Philadelphia police.
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