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NEWS
August 17, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Chester County prison and its private health-care contractor are facing a federal lawsuit in connection with the death of an inmate in March. The suit was filed last week on behalf of the family of Rae-Mone Carter Jr., who died on March 16 of acute-onset diabetes. It argues that Carter's death was preventable and that health-care workers employed by PrimeCare Medical Inc. did not provide treatment that would have saved him. Carter's family is seeking up to $900,000 in damages, according to the suit.
NEWS
July 31, 2013 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
THE JUNE 2011 jailhouse murder of Philadelphia inmate Earl Bostic was "vicious, just completely vicious," said the prosecutor who brought his attackers to justice. "It just shows that even prison won't protect people from guys like this," Assistant District Attorney Andrew Notaristefano said yesterday. "It will only protect the rest of us. " Rashawn Edwards, 25, and Jalik Peay, 22, two of the five defendants convicted in connection to the stabbing of Bostic, 42, and two other inmates inside the city's Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility, were sentenced yesterday to long stays in state prison.
NEWS
June 27, 2013 | By Juan A. Lozano, Associated Press
HUNTSVILLE, Texas - Texas marked a solemn moment in criminal justice Wednesday evening, executing its 500th inmate since it resumed carrying out capital punishment in 1982. Kimberly McCarthy, who was put to death for the murder of her 71-year-old neighbor, was also the first woman executed in the United States in nearly three years. McCarthy, 52, was executed for the 1997 robbery, beating, and fatal stabbing of retired college psychology professor Dorothy Booth. Booth had agreed to give McCarthy a cup of sugar before she was attacked with a butcher knife and candelabra at her home in Lancaster, about 15 miles south of Dallas.
NEWS
June 14, 2013 | By Allie Caren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Untold truths and strife seem muted in the silent chamber hallways of Eastern State Penitentiary with its aged, cracking teal paint; broken-down cells, and, outside, layering moss. However, last Saturday - as the sun peaked through an ominously bleak, rain-threatened Philadelphia day - tourists were in for a real taste of what the life of an inmate was like. On a typical weekend day, 800 visitors pass through the penitentiary grounds. Most visitors opt for an audio tour, narrated by Hollywood actor and writer Steve Buscemi.
NEWS
June 7, 2013
AN ERIE County Prison guard has been suspended indefinitely after allegations that he bought a car stereo and a big-screen television from an inmate who was trying raise bond money. Authorities say 29-year-old Brent Carr was suspended without pay on May 30 after an investigation. Carr reportedly said he understands what he did was wrong. Carr says he was trying to help a friend who lives in Detroit and that he purchased the items from the inmate's girlfriend. Prison officials claim that Carr both called and sent text messages to the girlfriend to arrange the purchases, and also discussed the purchases with the inmate at the prison.
NEWS
June 5, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Superior Court Judge Ronald E. Bookbinder cleared the way Monday for the Gloucester County jail to be closed and its inmates to be housed as far away as Newark, N.J. The Burlington County judge turned aside a plea from New Jersey's public defenders to temporarily halt the jail's closure. Jail officials plan to start transferring inmates Monday. The jail generally houses 200 to 270 inmates, with the majority awaiting trial or pretrial hearings. The public defenders filed suit May 9 to stop the closure, arguing that they would not be able to effectively represent their clients if the inmates were not housed near the courthouse in Woodbury.
NEWS
May 31, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
A clunky computerized data system that maintained information on inmates in New Jersey's county jails was largely responsible for $23.6 million in unemployment benefits, Medicaid coverage, food stamps, and cash assistance received by those behind bars, state Comptroller A. Matthew Boxer said Wednesday. In most of the cases, the benefits were improperly paid. The inmates - 20,000 in all - were not qualified for them since they were receiving room, board, and medical care while in prison, Boxer said.
NEWS
May 18, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal report issued Friday says two city jails, Philadelphia Industrial Correctional Center and Riverside Correctional Facility, had among the nation's highest rate of inmates who said they were the target of sexual victimization. At the Industrial Correctional Center, 6.3 percent of inmates who responded to the Bureau of Justice Statistics survey reported they were the victims of staff sexual misconduct, more than triple the national rate in jails of 1.8 percent. Staff sexual misconduct was defined to include all incidents of unwilling and willing sexual contact between staff and inmates, both of which are illegal.
NEWS
May 17, 2013 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
AS AN INMATE laborer at the Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility, Chal D. Kennedy Sr. worked in the kitchen, heating and serving meals for nearly 400 inmates and then cleaning up after them. That meant scrubbing down two giant ovens once or twice a week with a noxious degreaser that kept him coughing and left a sudsy sludge up his arms. "You look like you just came out from under an automobile," Kennedy, 46, of North Philadelphia, said of the two-hour, two-man cleanups. For the nearly three years he worked that $1.61-a-day job, prison staff ignored inmates' repeated requests for protective gear or training, he said.
NEWS
May 11, 2013 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
The series so far: The inmates have graduated from the three-month New Leash course. They have completed life-skills training and taught their dogs how to behave well enough to become obedient pets in new adoptive homes. Most of the men are getting ready to start paid internships at area animal shelters. Last of six parts. Three days after he turned 22, Jamal Thompson left prison a relatively free man. A former drug dealer whose years in juvenile detention had been a reprieve from his jagged life at home, Thompson had taken to New Leash on Life with hungry enthusiasm.
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