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Inpatient Care

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NEWS
December 4, 1999 | By Mike Madden and Jennifer Farrell, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Virtua-West Jersey Hospital Camden will shut down its inpatient services within the next two years, transferring those operations to the four other hospitals within the network and seeking other uses for its former flagship building here. With about 75 percent of the Camden hospital's 222 beds sitting empty - and with demand for inpatient care falling over the last few years - officials said they had to focus instead on less costly areas such as primary and senior care, home-based health aid and other outpatient services.
NEWS
August 26, 1997 | By R.A. Zaldivar, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The estimated $23 billion a year that Medicare loses in questionable billings goes not just to crooks perpetrating fraud, but to established hospitals and clinics that are breaking the rules. An ongoing federal investigation has found that 89 percent of hospitals nationwide have been double-billing for inpatient care in some cases. The practice involves not criminal fraud, but exploitation of the system by respected institutions, government officials say. Hospital officials say that much of what the government calls abuse are errors in interpreting Medicare's complex rules.
NEWS
April 8, 2000 | By Aamer Madhani, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Virtua-West Jersey Hospital Camden will likely shut down its inpatient services by the end of this year - six months earlier than was initially anticipated - and Virtua executives are considering several different uses for the soon-to-be vacant space, the hospital's top-ranking officer said yesterday. Housing a state-funded substance-abuse program for adolescents, expanding adult day care, and leasing some of the space to Camden neighbors Cooper Hospital-University Medical Center and Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center are among the ideas that have been considered, said Richard Miller, Virtua's president and chief executive.
BUSINESS
December 10, 1999 | By Karl Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
AFSCME District 33 president Herman "Pete" Matthews said yesterday that he would act to phase out dwindling inpatient care at the union's John F. Kennedy Memorial Hospital in Northeast Philadelphia. Matthews said that the union that represents Philadelphia's 10,000 blue-collar municipal workers was trying to lease the hospital building to other tenants, such as a nursing home, while continuing to run two busy outpatient clinics at Kennedy's site and at 30th and Walnut Streets. "We're looking at all options," he said.
NEWS
May 25, 1989 | By Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The city was sued yesterday in federal court by parents of a retarded 13- year-old autistic boy who has been confined in a "holding area" of a community health center for more than six weeks, often tied to a bed. The suit was filed on behalf of Marc Ciocco in an effort to force the city to find a psychiatric hospital that will admit the sometimes assaultive youth, and others like him, instead of caring for them in facilities that aren't equipped...
NEWS
July 1, 2009 | By Karen Knee INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center in Camden closed its inpatient pediatric unit yesterday, mainly because the nine-bed unit had been underused, a spokeswoman said. Pediatric admissions at Lourdes have been declining for 15 to 20 years because of improvements in medical procedures and preventive care, said Wendy Marano, director of public relations for the Lourdes Health System, which operates the 410-bed Camden center. "The very small percentage of kids that do need to be admitted" will go to Cooper University Hospital, about one mile away, Marano said.
NEWS
August 19, 2005 | By Arthur C. Evans Jr. and Joanne Godley
No children should be born into environments in which their health and welfare are in danger. But there are better ways to protect our city's children than paying women who are addicted to crack cocaine not to have babies. That is the disturbing approach being taken by a private group that began proselytizing on the streets of some of Philadelphia's poorest neighborhoods last week. The North Carolina-based group, which calls itself CRACK (Children Requiring a Caring Kommunity)
NEWS
February 17, 2007 | By Mari A. Schaefer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Garrett Reid has spent the last week participating in an out-of-state drug rehabilitation program to which he was accompanied by his father, Eagles coach Andy Reid, an attorney said in court yesterday. Garrett Reid's lawyer, Ross Weiss, said his client would be returning for an additional two weeks of inpatient therapy, followed by an outpatient program. Another attorney for Garrett Reid, 23, said Andy Reid accompanied his son "as a parent. " The drug rehab disclosure came at Garrett Reid's arraignment on misdemeanor drug and traffic charges following a Jan. 30 accident when he ran a red light in Plymouth Township and injured a 55-year-old woman.
NEWS
September 12, 2003 | By Burton Blender
As a physician, I find it difficult to watch an old friend die, but I am mourning the demise of Parkview Hospital in the Feltonville section of Northeast Philadelphia, where I have practiced family medicine for 40 years. On Monday, this small community hospital that served a diverse, economically challenged population, officially closed. Founded as Juniata Hospital more than 40 years ago, Parkview was established by a group of dedicated osteopathic physicians. It was owned and operated by numerous health care providers, among them the Graduate Health System and the Allegheny Health System, whose financial woes led to eventual bankruptcy and the indictment of its chief executive officer.
NEWS
August 16, 1992 | By Kathryn Quigley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Two Lower Bucks hospitals plan to expand to provide better health care. Delaware Valley Medical Center (DVMC) in Langhorne is breaking ground for its $2.1 million critical-care facility on Wednesday. Lower Bucks Hospital in Bristol Township is waiting for approval from the state Department of Health to build a 17,000-square-foot outpatient surgery center next to its main hospital. Each hospital's facility would serve a different purpose. The critical-care center at DVMC would provide 10 new beds for cardiac, postsurgical and critically ill patients, said Patricia M. Hilgar, director of community relations.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 29, 2013 | By Andrew Kitchenman, NJ SPOTLIGHT
New Jerseyans who live in different communities use hospitals at widely different rates, and those differences could pave the way to improving health care and reducing costs, according to a new report by Rutgers University researchers. The report, focused on use patterns in low-income communities and opportunities for better care and lower costs, found wide variations in how many avoidable ER visits residents make. The reason that this information is so valuable, according to coauthor Joel Cantor, director of the Rutgers Center for State Health Policy, is that it opens up the possibility that communities that rely heavily on hospitals for primary care can learn from those who make fewer trips to the ER. For example, the report found that Camden residents had more than three times as many avoidable visits to emergency departments than did residents of the Union City-West New York-North Bergen region.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2012 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
On June 27, with enormous pride, optimism, and a sense of history, the CEOs of Abington Health and Holy Redeemer Health System faced reporters and announced their plans to form a partnership. The leaders knew this was a bold move, even shocking, to partner a secular hospital with a Catholic one, but they felt it was so beneficial and important they were sure the community would come to see it as they did. The community did not. Within three weeks, the proposed partnership - a year in planning - was dead.
NEWS
July 1, 2009 | By Karen Knee INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center in Camden closed its inpatient pediatric unit yesterday, mainly because the nine-bed unit had been underused, a spokeswoman said. Pediatric admissions at Lourdes have been declining for 15 to 20 years because of improvements in medical procedures and preventive care, said Wendy Marano, director of public relations for the Lourdes Health System, which operates the 410-bed Camden center. "The very small percentage of kids that do need to be admitted" will go to Cooper University Hospital, about one mile away, Marano said.
NEWS
March 23, 2009 | By Brian Hickey
Ever since a hit-and-run driver mowed me down in Collingswood on Nov. 28, I've been considered a "patient. " The conversational-English translation of that term is "dramatically injured person at the total mercy of insurance-company whims. " After I was released from inpatient care at Philadelphia's Magee Rehabilitation in January, I was forced to wait more than six weeks for outpatient physical, occupational, and cognitive therapy. For context, more than two weeks of waiting risks regression on all three fronts.
NEWS
February 17, 2007 | By Mari A. Schaefer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Garrett Reid has spent the last week participating in an out-of-state drug rehabilitation program to which he was accompanied by his father, Eagles coach Andy Reid, an attorney said in court yesterday. Garrett Reid's lawyer, Ross Weiss, said his client would be returning for an additional two weeks of inpatient therapy, followed by an outpatient program. Another attorney for Garrett Reid, 23, said Andy Reid accompanied his son "as a parent. " The drug rehab disclosure came at Garrett Reid's arraignment on misdemeanor drug and traffic charges following a Jan. 30 accident when he ran a red light in Plymouth Township and injured a 55-year-old woman.
NEWS
August 19, 2005 | By Arthur C. Evans Jr. and Joanne Godley
No children should be born into environments in which their health and welfare are in danger. But there are better ways to protect our city's children than paying women who are addicted to crack cocaine not to have babies. That is the disturbing approach being taken by a private group that began proselytizing on the streets of some of Philadelphia's poorest neighborhoods last week. The North Carolina-based group, which calls itself CRACK (Children Requiring a Caring Kommunity)
NEWS
January 16, 2004 | By Nancy Petersen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Main Line Health System's decision to close its inpatient psychiatric unit at Paoli Hospital has triggered a furor within the Chester County mental-health community. The 10-bed unit at Paoli is set to close in June, leaving Brandywine Hospital the only hospital in Chester County with inpatient psychiatric care. The Brandywine unit, which has 10 adult beds and 10 geriatric behavioral health-care beds, is full 80 percent of the time, officials said. "Chester County is very much in need of inpatient psychiatric beds," said psychiatrist George Adams, whose county practice spans three decades.
NEWS
September 12, 2003 | By Burton Blender
As a physician, I find it difficult to watch an old friend die, but I am mourning the demise of Parkview Hospital in the Feltonville section of Northeast Philadelphia, where I have practiced family medicine for 40 years. On Monday, this small community hospital that served a diverse, economically challenged population, officially closed. Founded as Juniata Hospital more than 40 years ago, Parkview was established by a group of dedicated osteopathic physicians. It was owned and operated by numerous health care providers, among them the Graduate Health System and the Allegheny Health System, whose financial woes led to eventual bankruptcy and the indictment of its chief executive officer.
NEWS
April 8, 2000 | By Aamer Madhani, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Virtua-West Jersey Hospital Camden will likely shut down its inpatient services by the end of this year - six months earlier than was initially anticipated - and Virtua executives are considering several different uses for the soon-to-be vacant space, the hospital's top-ranking officer said yesterday. Housing a state-funded substance-abuse program for adolescents, expanding adult day care, and leasing some of the space to Camden neighbors Cooper Hospital-University Medical Center and Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center are among the ideas that have been considered, said Richard Miller, Virtua's president and chief executive.
BUSINESS
December 10, 1999 | By Karl Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
AFSCME District 33 president Herman "Pete" Matthews said yesterday that he would act to phase out dwindling inpatient care at the union's John F. Kennedy Memorial Hospital in Northeast Philadelphia. Matthews said that the union that represents Philadelphia's 10,000 blue-collar municipal workers was trying to lease the hospital building to other tenants, such as a nursing home, while continuing to run two busy outpatient clinics at Kennedy's site and at 30th and Walnut Streets. "We're looking at all options," he said.
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