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Insect

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NEWS
January 7, 1990 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
They found the first one in a peach tree near Dodger Stadium last summer. At first, that discovery of a blue-eyed, yellow-bellied fruit fly caused little alarm. After all, it was just one. Then another fly was discovered nearby two weeks later, on Aug. 2. Another was found on Aug. 6. On Aug. 8, Gov. George Deukmejian declared a state of emergency and ordered in the helicopters. It was too late. The return invasion of the Mediterranean fruit fly had already begun in earnest.
NEWS
March 17, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ash trees are the pride of West Chester's public parks. One majestic specimen may be a state champion. Falls Township's Lesha Drive is lined with ashes. When the houses were built, ashes were planted in every front yard. When Mark Bayer built his Buckingham Township house, he took care not to disturb the ash, so big he and his wife together can't get their arms around it. All are in jeopardy, as is every other ash tree in the region, thanks to a half-inch-long, glitter-green insect from Asia that kills nearly every ash tree in its path.
NEWS
October 12, 2002 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Asian longhorned beetle, a tree-eating pest with the potential to wreak more havoc than gypsy moths, chestnut blight and Dutch elm disease combined, has been discovered in northern New Jersey. Federal and state insect experts yesterday were crawling over a nine-acre site next to an apartment building in Jersey City where the shiny black-and-white creature was found. About 100 trees show evidence of infestation and will be chipped and burned according to federal regulations, said officials at the state Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
August 4, 1990 | By Michael E. Ruane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marching 'cross the driveway Creeping up the wall On legs that number 62 Trekking through the hall These bugs are known as millipedes Named for their many feet But round about, this summertime One zillion do we meet Well, perhaps not that many, but scientists and exterminators say there does seem to be an unusually large number this season of what technically is known as Oxidus gracilis - the common millipede, or...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1993 | By Ellen Goldman Frasco, FOR THE INQUIRER
For a week beginning Saturday, those attention-grabbing dino-denizens of the Academy of Natural Sciences will have to share some of the spotlight with a bunch of "Bodacious Bugs. " This weekend, youngsters can discover the latest trends in "bugwear" at a T-shirt-making workshop by area artist Barbara Hock (noon to 2 p.m. and 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, and 1 to 3 p.m. next Friday). Using a clean, white T-shirt brought from home, participants will create an insect design with fabric paints, crayons and glitter.
LIVING
December 29, 1997 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Maureen Kennedy flips over the cricket in her heated skillet. The insect turns over with a little plop. Its six legs wave about in the heat, its antennae twitch, its ribbed torso glistens in the sizzling oil. When it's done - nice and crispy brown - Kennedy pours some microwave-heated chocolate into a butterfly shaped plastic mold, drops the cooked cricket in, and covers it with more chocolate. Kennedy, who is a guide at the Insectarium, a quirky museum in Northeast Philadelphia devoted solely to insects, is running through her cricket recipe in preparation for two forthcoming insect cookouts that are open to the public: The events turn people's stomachs but still bring in the crowds.
NEWS
March 18, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
A small, glitter-green insect that has killed more than 50 million ash trees in the Midwest and beyond has arrived in the Philadelphia region. Officials had both dreaded and expected it - just not this soon. On Wednesday, its presence was confirmed in an ash tree at a condominium neighborhood in Warrington, Bucks County. When officials looked at the surrounding forest, they realized maybe 20 ashes were under attack. "This is pretty much going to hammer ash trees in Southeastern Pennsylvania almost into oblivion," said Scott Guiser, an educator at Pennsylvania State University's extension service in Bucks County.
NEWS
October 2, 1996 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / MICHAEL S. WIRTZ
A largish butterfly is prepared for display at the Academy of Natural Sciences on the Parkway. City rigger Tyrone Brockington was getting ready to hoist the insect yesterday. On Oct. 12, the academy will open an exhibition of tropical butterflies.
NEWS
May 27, 1993 | Inquirer photographs by John Costello
Bees in the trees may not seem unusual. In recent years, however, parasitic mites have decimated the bee population across the country. Beekeepers and insect experts worry that billions of bees will die before enough bees develop a resistance to the mites. That made the wild swarm spotted in Morris Arboretum a rare find, and cause for action. Workers placed the swarm in a hive Tuesday for safekeeping with a local beekeeper.
NEWS
November 6, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bad news in the bug department: The emerald ash borer, a tiny, glitter-green insect from China expected to kill virtually all ash trees in the East - unless they are treated with expensive chemicals - may have a new target. The U.S. Department of Agriculture confirmed recently that the borer had attacked the white fringe tree, which is in the same family as not only the ash, but forsythia and lilac. Experts don't know quite what to make of the find yet, other than that it is worrisome.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2015 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Veronica is a fun-loving 10-year-old with an artistic flair. She delights in creating interesting pieces, and participates in many kinds of art projects. She proudly shows off the bracelets she crafts in pink and blue, her favorite colors. Veronica loves learning things and is intrigued by insects, particularly ladybugs. An ideal day for her would include a trip to a place where she could learn more about bugs and their habitats. She also enjoys swimming, writing, dancing, playing video games, and watching television.
NEWS
November 28, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The dreaded Khapra beetle has a voracious and varied appetite. Resistant to insecticides, it's all but indestructible. As such, it is considered one of the world's most fearsome pests of grains, rice, beans and other "stored products. " And it is high on the least-wanted list at U.S. borders. Yet, there it was. Twice in September, officials at Philadelphia International Airport discovered - and hastily dispatched - the beetle and its larvae. The insects had come into the country aboard food that passengers carried with them on Qatar Airlines flights from Qatar's capital, Doha.
NEWS
November 6, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bad news in the bug department: The emerald ash borer, a tiny, glitter-green insect from China expected to kill virtually all ash trees in the East - unless they are treated with expensive chemicals - may have a new target. The U.S. Department of Agriculture confirmed recently that the borer had attacked the white fringe tree, which is in the same family as not only the ash, but forsythia and lilac. Experts don't know quite what to make of the find yet, other than that it is worrisome.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
A small bowl made its way around an auditorium Saturday at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, with a staff member scooping treats out and into the eager hands of kids and their parents. Inside the bowl: crispy, Cajun-spiced crickets. "Are we allowed to have more?" 6-year-old Anya Geynisman of Wyndmoor asked after she'd eaten her handful. It was opening day of the academy's seventh annual Bug Fest, and amid the stuffed deer, the dinosaurs, and the mummies, displays of beetles, tarantulas, and butterflies lined the halls.
SPORTS
June 30, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
AKELEY, Pa. - The bats Ted Williams demanded, with their 25 growth rings per inch, came from the Allegheny Mountain forests that unfurl in all directions from this flyspeck Warren County town. So did the wide-grain models Pete Rose preferred and Dick Allen's 40-inch, 40-ounce wagon tongues. This vast and remote region, straddling Route 6 along the Pennsylvania-New York border, has long been the mother lode of baseball bats. For a century or more, nearly all those used by major-league hitters came from the white ash that grows and is milled in this bat belt.
NEWS
March 17, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ash trees are the pride of West Chester's public parks. One majestic specimen may be a state champion. Falls Township's Lesha Drive is lined with ashes. When the houses were built, ashes were planted in every front yard. When Mark Bayer built his Buckingham Township house, he took care not to disturb the ash, so big he and his wife together can't get their arms around it. All are in jeopardy, as is every other ash tree in the region, thanks to a half-inch-long, glitter-green insect from Asia that kills nearly every ash tree in its path.
NEWS
August 16, 2013 | JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer; takiffj@phillynews.com
ALL THAT summer rain has made the flowers grow and spawned more pretty fireflies than Gizmo Guy has seen in aeons. But it's also made this an intensely good (and we mean bad) summer for mosquitoes, and sparked lots of pitches for products claiming to ward off the critters. To deal with the onslaught (of bugs and devices), I turned to my expert in all things organically outdoors, Mike McGrath, host of the syndicated radio show "You Bet Your Garden. " (It airs 11 a.m.-noon Saturdays on WHYY 91-FM.)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2013 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University's Bug Fest returns on Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. with the Masters of Deception. Now in its sixth year, the Fest will have its popular yummy insect culinary treats, such as chocolate chirp cookies, baked by Chef Zack Lemman. Cheer on your favorite roach during the Roach Race 500. At the Masquerade Bug Ball, kids can dance, get their faces painted, and have insect tattoos applied. Children can also make insect crafts.
TRAVEL
July 8, 2013 | By Fritz Faerber, Associated Press
PEORIA, Ill. - Here's a place where caterpillar does not refer to fuzzy little insects. The new Caterpillar Visitors Center is all about the roaring massive black-and-yellow machines that dig and lift at construction and mining sites. Caterpillar Inc., maker of heavy machinery ranging from bulldozers and excavators to tunnel-boring machines and giant generators, is based in the central Illinois town of Peoria. The company opened a nearly 50,000-square-foot visitors center last fall, investing more than $52 million dollars in the center and the Peoria Riverfront Museum nearby.
NEWS
October 1, 2012 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Columnist
One of the more difficult aspects of evolution for some people to swallow is the notion that random copying errors in DNA can add up to anything useful. In two recently published projects, however, scientists show how typos can indeed lead to improvements. In numerous species of insects, they document the DNA errors that led to changes that are not only beneficial but also brilliant. Various species of beetles, aphids, butterflies, and moths have independently acquired genetic errors that allow them to eat highly toxic plants and then use the toxins to defend themselves against predators.
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