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Insect

NEWS
September 29, 2008 | By Cynthia Henry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Seventeen thousand trees planted, thousands more to go, Louis Cantafio tallied while handing out tools at the Franklin Parker Preserve near Chatsworth. "When you unload 25,000 trees on 14 square miles, you think, 'Oh my God, I'll never get this done,' " said Cantafio, senior land steward of the New Jersey Conservation Foundation. But thanks to volunteers from groups including the New Jersey Youth Corps in Camden, and Rutgers and Kean Universities, the preserve's former cranberry bogs off Route 563 in Burlington County are getting a boost in reverting to their natural swampy state.
FOOD
August 21, 2008 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Birds do it. Isn't that enough? Must we, the sophisticated species, eat insects too? Most emphatically yes, says David Gracer, an otherwise ordinary college-level writing instructor from Providence, R.I., who was showing off his bug cuisine at the Academy of Natural Sciences last Saturday. His part-time business, Sunrise Land Shrimp, aims at getting people to eat insects. Pound for pound, Gracer says, insects contain higher percentages of protein than our more conventional food favorite, the cow. Thus an insect-based diet is a healthful, sustainable diet.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2008 | By APRIL LISANTE, For the Daily News
THEY TASTE a little like shrimp. And have the texture of crunchy chips. And if you close your eyes, you won't notice that they have legs. And antennae. And some even still have wings. Welcome to entomologist Zack Lemann's wonderful world of bug cookery, where dozens of varieties of crawly creatures aren't your average everyday pests - they're breakfast, lunch and dinner. Sounds too disgusting to be true? Think again. This New Orleans scientist is trying to make Americans realize what other cultures the world over have known for a long time: Bugs can be tasty little treats.
NEWS
August 12, 2007 | By Helen I. Hwang FOR THE INQUIRER
On July 20, a mosquito sample carrying the West Nile virus was found in Thornbury Township in Chester County, in a residential neighborhood not far from Cheyney University. August and September are the peak seasons for West Nile, and infected mosquitos are often found in low-lying, marshy terrain, like where the insects were found in Thornbury, said Seth Lisinski, the Chester County Health Department's West Nile Virus Program Coordinator. Lisinski cautioned that the news that the virus has been found in Chester County was not alarming.
NEWS
July 29, 2007 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the Chester County Health Department puts its restaurant inspections online in early January, the reports might offer a fuller appreciation of dining in the county. The Dilworthtown Inn is one of the most highly regarded restaurants in the county. But consider a Nov. 16, 2006 report by the Health Department's Bureau of Environmental Health Protection. In response to a complaint, an inspector found "many dead roach-like insects observed on glue boards in the basement," but none in the kitchen.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2006 | By Brooke Honeyford FOR THE INQUIRER
To celebrate the release of their third CD for children, Rebecca Frezza and Big Truck will make their Philadelphia debut Saturday as part of the Peanut Butter & Jams series at World Cafe Live. The band will perform tunes from Tall and Small, as well as selections from their two previous albums. Frezza's performances, which incorporate singing and dancing, are designed to entertain toddlers to adults. A former dancer with touring shows like West Side Story and A Chorus Line, Frezza tapped into her music-writing abilities when she and her children began attending Music Together, an early-childhood music program where Frezza says she "loved the idea and practice of bringing music to children.
NEWS
March 10, 2006 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dennis J. Joslyn, 58, of Villanova, a professor of biology at the Camden campus of Rutgers University whose research in the field of insect genetics helped advance mosquito control efforts in New Jersey, died of heart failure March 1 at home. Professor Joslyn's work in genetics included research that analyzed the DNA of mosquitoes and the development of cancer cells. He involved his students in his research. Together they foraged through marshes to collect insects they would later crush and douse with blue ink in order to study their genetic makeup.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2005 | By Dana Reddington INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They possess magnetlike powers. At the sight of them, you either run away, repelled, or are drawn closer, eager to investigate. If bugs bring out your natural curiosity - or if you just want an up-close look at the nonliving variety - check out the Museum of the American Philosophical Society on Sunday. A three-hour program on bug collecting, inspired by the museum's "Treasures Revealed" exhibition, will feature amateur entomologist Greg Cowper. Cowper spent the summer gathering bugs that live in Independence National Historical Park; he'll bring that mounted collection with him, show how to mount your own collection, and give tips on catching the critters.
NEWS
October 16, 2005 | By Julie Shaw INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
At the bottom of the Capulin Volcano in New Mexico, John Gruber and students from Friends' Central School in Wynnewood watched the moths flutter, landing on the hanging, illuminated white bedsheet. It was night. Gruber, chairman of the private school's Upper School science department, took a jar and closed it over one moth. He examined the green-winged creature, confirming that it was one he wanted to study. Gruber, 40, of Ardmore, has been catching moths and butterflies since he was a child.
NEWS
August 21, 2005 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the beady eyes of two invasive insects, the Philadelphia region would be a bacchanal - an orgy of fine food and wild sex amongst the maples, sycamores, birches and ashes that shade the city and suburbs. Were the Asian longhorned beetle and the emerald ash borer to converge here, potentially half of the urban forest - well more than a million trees - could be fatally infected. Such is the worst-case scenario. And it is inching closer on six spindly legs. Bearing down on Pennsylvania from the west is the ash borer, a glitter-green bug about a half-inch long that lays its eggs on the bark of ashes.
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