CollectionsInsectarium
IN THE NEWS

Insectarium

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2006 | By Brooke Honeyford FOR THE INQUIRER
After a walk through Arachnid Alley and the Cockroach Kitchen, the Lovely Lepidoptera lecture will be a relief. Lepidoptera, a term used to classify moths and butterflies that derives from the Greek words lepido for scale and ptera for wings, have long been regarded for their beauty and symbolism in world religions and philosophies on life. At the Insectarium in Northeast Philadelphia, billed as the nation's largest insect museum, educator Laura Hammon will give a presentation on how to identify the nearly 28,000 species of butterflies and moths as well as the importance of these winged insects in the ecosystem.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1996 | By Ciaran P. McNally, FOR THE INQUIRER
Thousands of roaches carpeted the white kitchen floor. They were layered on countertops, all over a sink. Disgusting, but at least they were dead. The live ones were trapped behind the cabinet doors, thousands of them, crawling over one another, just waiting for the safety of darkness to come out and climb up your leg. The only thing that separated us from the tiny scavengers was a clear wall surrounding the square display. I got a sudden case of the heebie-jeebies. And I'm 26 years old. Welcome to the Insectarium, where bugs and insects are admired, examined - and feared.
NEWS
October 29, 1992 | By Mary Dempsey, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
John Moore was alone a lot as a child in Columbus, Ohio. But under rocks and logs, he found some little ones to play with. Bugs. Critters most people avoid like the plague came to fascinate Moore, 29, who now lives in Wallingford. On a collecting trip to Ridley Creek State Park, he might find a "gold mine" of insects in a field containing deer carcasses. "I turn them over, cut them open. I go along the trails and look under horse manure," he said with a laugh. But one result of such prowling is a personal collection containing rows and rows of beautifully preserved beetles with shells of emerald and sapphire hues.
NEWS
April 13, 2007 | By Kristen A. Graham, PHILLY.COM
Welcome to the city of brotherly love! Perhaps we're biased, but we think you've landed in one of the greatest towns around. There's plenty to keep you busy during your Philadelphia visit. Great eating? Check. Grab a cheesesteak, hit the Reading Terminal or the Italian Market, or try one of the city's fine BYOs. Shopping? Check. Head to South Street for funky finds, Rittenhouse Square and adjacent Walnut Street for upscale stores, or Franklin Mills for bargains galore.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 1994 | By Penny Jeannechild, FOR THE INQUIRER
From Webster's Second New World Dictionary: Bat - Any of an order of mouselike flying mammals with furry body and membranous wings: the insectivores are usually seen flying at night when they capture their prey by echolocation. Insectivore - Any of an order of generally small, primitive mammals that are active mainly at night and that feed principally on insects. Mouselike? Furry? Capture by echolocation? They sound so - adorable and exotic. Where's the stuff about punctures to the neck or morphing into Dracula?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1994 | By Penny Jeannechild, FOR THE INQUIRER
Flutterbies, my grandmother called them. To a child's eyes, the impossibly colored Lepidopteras were some sort of dusty-winged fairy magic. Nothing about the butterflies seemed real as they flitted about the back yard. Of course, not everyone has a back yard. Which is why we tip our butterfly nets to the following nature-oriented spots, for bringing back-yard magic to the masses: (Can't stand butterflies? We've thrown in a cat event, just for you.) INSECTARIUM.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1998 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Why is TV Food Network one of the fastest-growing television channels? Because people love food. They love eating it and, sometimes even more so, they love watching chefs cook it. At many trendy restaurants, diners crowd the tables around an open kitchen to savor the sounds and sights of the clanging pots, the sizzling pans, the steaming kettles and the screaming line cooks. Which brings us to Saturday's cooking demonstration. It's not at some restaurant called Glitzo in Center City.
FOOD
January 31, 2001 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
What would you eat to survive? A hairy tarantula? A plate of wriggly worms? A cockroach concoction? You just know that the contestants on the new "Survivor: The Australian Outback" series will indulge in something of the sort. Remember the insect-eating contest on the second episode of the first "Survivor"? The insects were grubs - specifically, the larval stage of an island beetle. And remember the later banquet of roasted rat? "Survivor 2" kicked off Sunday in the barren Outback, where there's plenty of good bug-eatin', according to Jeanette A'psis, education director of the Insectarium at Steve's Bug Off in Holmesburg.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2012
Special Events Germantown White House Exhibits Interactive exhibits featuring George Washington's family & household. Germantown White House (formerly Deshler-Morris House), 5442 Germantown Ave.; 215-965-2305. Prohibition Cocktail Tour Philadelphia Tour with tastings. Reading Terminal Market, 51 N. 12th St. $55. Closes 12/22. Historic Smithville Mansion Guided Tours Learn about the property's history as you explore the mansion, annex rooms & courtyard gardens. 803 Smithville Rd., Mount Holly.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2013
Special Events 2013 Jobs: When-Where & For Whom Job Discussion Panel. The Pyramid Club, 1735 Market St., 52d Fl. $35; $25 members/full time students. 1/11. 7:45-10 am. Germantown White House Exhibits Interactive exhibits featuring George Washington's family & household. Germantown White House (formerly Deshler-Morris House), 5442 Germantown Ave.; 215-965-2305. Historic Smithville Mansion Guided Tours Learn about the property's history as you explore the mansion, annex rooms & courtyard gardens.
FOOD
August 21, 2008 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Birds do it. Isn't that enough? Must we, the sophisticated species, eat insects too? Most emphatically yes, says David Gracer, an otherwise ordinary college-level writing instructor from Providence, R.I., who was showing off his bug cuisine at the Academy of Natural Sciences last Saturday. His part-time business, Sunrise Land Shrimp, aims at getting people to eat insects. Pound for pound, Gracer says, insects contain higher percentages of protein than our more conventional food favorite, the cow. Thus an insect-based diet is a healthful, sustainable diet.
NEWS
April 13, 2007 | By Kristen A. Graham, PHILLY.COM
Welcome to the city of brotherly love! Perhaps we're biased, but we think you've landed in one of the greatest towns around. There's plenty to keep you busy during your Philadelphia visit. Great eating? Check. Grab a cheesesteak, hit the Reading Terminal or the Italian Market, or try one of the city's fine BYOs. Shopping? Check. Head to South Street for funky finds, Rittenhouse Square and adjacent Walnut Street for upscale stores, or Franklin Mills for bargains galore.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2006 | By Brooke Honeyford FOR THE INQUIRER
After a walk through Arachnid Alley and the Cockroach Kitchen, the Lovely Lepidoptera lecture will be a relief. Lepidoptera, a term used to classify moths and butterflies that derives from the Greek words lepido for scale and ptera for wings, have long been regarded for their beauty and symbolism in world religions and philosophies on life. At the Insectarium in Northeast Philadelphia, billed as the nation's largest insect museum, educator Laura Hammon will give a presentation on how to identify the nearly 28,000 species of butterflies and moths as well as the importance of these winged insects in the ecosystem.
FOOD
January 31, 2001 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
What would you eat to survive? A hairy tarantula? A plate of wriggly worms? A cockroach concoction? You just know that the contestants on the new "Survivor: The Australian Outback" series will indulge in something of the sort. Remember the insect-eating contest on the second episode of the first "Survivor"? The insects were grubs - specifically, the larval stage of an island beetle. And remember the later banquet of roasted rat? "Survivor 2" kicked off Sunday in the barren Outback, where there's plenty of good bug-eatin', according to Jeanette A'psis, education director of the Insectarium at Steve's Bug Off in Holmesburg.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2000 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You ever hold a whiptail scorpion in your hand? Would you like to? Oh, come on, he won't hurt you. No thanks, I say. I'm at the Insectarium, 8046 Frankford Ave. Jennifer Bush, the director, is showing me around. Bush invites another visitor, Ian Dahlgleish, to hold the insect. Ian, who lives with his family in Morrell Park, is 9 years old. He says no. I'm with you, Ian. Bush gives him the same pitch. Now Ian nods and extends his right hand. Very gently, Bush places the whiptail scorpion on his palm.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1998 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Why is TV Food Network one of the fastest-growing television channels? Because people love food. They love eating it and, sometimes even more so, they love watching chefs cook it. At many trendy restaurants, diners crowd the tables around an open kitchen to savor the sounds and sights of the clanging pots, the sizzling pans, the steaming kettles and the screaming line cooks. Which brings us to Saturday's cooking demonstration. It's not at some restaurant called Glitzo in Center City.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1996 | By Ciaran P. McNally, FOR THE INQUIRER
Thousands of roaches carpeted the white kitchen floor. They were layered on countertops, all over a sink. Disgusting, but at least they were dead. The live ones were trapped behind the cabinet doors, thousands of them, crawling over one another, just waiting for the safety of darkness to come out and climb up your leg. The only thing that separated us from the tiny scavengers was a clear wall surrounding the square display. I got a sudden case of the heebie-jeebies. And I'm 26 years old. Welcome to the Insectarium, where bugs and insects are admired, examined - and feared.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|