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Inspections

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NEWS
April 3, 1991 | By Robin Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Fire Commissioner Roger Ulshafer asserted last week that the city Department of Licenses and Inspections was too corrupt to be trusted with high-rise fire-safety inspections, he had history on his side. Since its inception in 1951, L&I has had an almost uninterrupted record of bribery, exortion, favoritism and petty graft. Philadelphia's first L&I commissioner, Walter Pytko, warned in February 1952 that "any inspector who takes a bribe or accepts money not only will be dismissed but also will be prosecuted.
NEWS
April 19, 1986 | By CYNTHIA BURTON, MICHEL MARRIOTT and ANN GERHART, Daily News Staff Writers
The mayor and his top aides said yesterday they knew nothing about a plan to inspect MOVE headquarters that was aborted after a crowd gathered in front of the Southwest Philadelphia house yesterday morning. The morning inspection was canceled after the Daily News reported yesterday that the city Department of Licenses and Inspections was coming to call. Managing Director James S. White and other city officials decided to call off the scheduled inspection during a two-hour meeting in White's office yesterday, said Capt.
NEWS
August 24, 1989 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Need a favor in Bensalem? Maybe picking up the tab for a motel room will help. Some motel owners say that's what helped them defeat a proposed ordinance requiring annual township inspections of motel rooms and apartments. At least one Bensalem supervisor says so, too. "In my opinion it was politics. I think it was a good ordinance," said Supervisor Joseph Francano Jr. Bensalem supervisors voted, 4-1, Monday night to reject the ordinance. Before the vote, Supervisor David Costello, who voted with the majority, said the township owed the motel owners a debt for giving free rooms to visiting township job applicants and letting township police use a motel gym for free.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2008 | INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
US Airways Group Inc. found problems on seven of its Boeing 757 aircraft during inspections prompted by the loss of a wing component from another company plane during a March 22 flight from Orlando to Philadelphia. US Airways spokesman Phil Gee says the carrier inspected 17 Boeing 757s with wing specifications similar to the damaged jetliner. Last week, a small part of a 757's wing dislodged and hit a passenger window. Nobody was injured, and the plane landed safely at Philadelphia International Airport.
NEWS
December 12, 1994 | By Richard Berkowitz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In a case testing the limits of the Fourth Amendment, the United States District Court has ruled that Glenolden Borough can continue its inspections of rental properties despite the objection of tenants. Judge Stewart Dalzell rejected the claim of Mary D. Smith, a resident of Glen Manor Apartments. Her suit alleged that Glenolden Borough's search of her apartment for its compliance with building and fire codes violated the Fourth Amendment's protection against "unreasonable search and seizures.
NEWS
March 7, 1987 | By William Beerman, Special to The Inquirer
The Pennsauken Township Committee has given a cool reception to a proposal that the township conduct indoor house inspections as a method of preventing accidents such as one that killed a Willingboro woman and her three children on Sunday. Art Johnson, township code enforcement officer, proposed at the committee's work session last night that the township conduct interior inspections of homes and require buyers to obtain certificates of approval before closing home purchases. Johnson talked about the recent Willingboro deaths, which were attributed to carbon-monoxide poisoning from a faulty furnace pipe in a newly purchased home.
NEWS
May 15, 1990 | By Kathy Sheehan, Daily News Staff Writer
Safety inspections on SEPTA subway cars came under scrutiny yesterday during a hearing into the March 7 fatal derailment near 30th Street Station. But an inquiry panel from the National Transportation Safety Board heard conflicting accounts on who actually inspects the cars and how inspections should be carried out. Four people were killed and at least 165 injured when a traction motor on Car 817 fell off its support housing under the floor of the car, causing the derailment of the westbound Market-Frankford train near 30th Street during morning rush hour.
NEWS
May 28, 2000 | By Monica Yant Kinney, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the aftermath of the deadly collapse of Pier 34, Philadelphia officials have been repeating a mantra: It is not the city's responsibility to make sure the structure supporting the pier was sound. "The structure of that property is the owner's responsibility," said Ed McLaughlin, commissioner of the city Department of Licenses and Inspections. "If an owner found problems . . . it would be the owner's responsibility to take corrective action. " In that, however, Philadelphia differs from a number of its counterparts around the country.
NEWS
May 1, 1996 | by Scott Heimer, Daily News Staff Writer
In case you were one of those unfortunate folks stuck in what one top highway official called an "unbearable backup" on the Schuylkill Expressway yesterday morning, PennDOT wants you to know it's sorry and it'll try to prevent it from happening again. "We directed our contractor to stop work and cease all weekday inspections on I-76 because of the unbearable backups that resulted this morning from closing one of two eastbound lanes by City Avenue," PennDOT district administrator Andrew L. Warren said yesterday.
NEWS
May 15, 1990 | By Laurie Hollman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carmen DiGaetano inspected the motor that triggered the deadliest accident in SEPTA history five days before it dropped from a subway train, but didn't look to see whether motor supports were loose or worn. He said he wasn't supposed to. Gino Roman inspected the motor a month before the accident and said he looked for signs the primary motor support had failed - but only because he took it upon himself to do so. He said it wasn't officially part of his job. In the first of two days of hearings by the National Transportation Safety Board about the derailment March 7 on the Market-Frankford line, SEPTA employees testified yesterday to practices that raised questions about the quality of inspection programs and the extent of analysis and communication that went on prior to the accident when a problem was discovered.
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NEWS
May 8, 2015 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gathered outside a hulking, vacant North Philadelphia commercial building, city officials Wednesday announced a joint initiative between the Department of Licenses and Inspections and the Fire Department to inspect derelict properties. The idea is to evaluate dangerous, empty structures larger than 15,000 square feet - so-called mantraps - for the safety of firefighters and the public. Many such buildings, like the one at 3617 N. Eighth St., will be demolished. But the media event, attended by Mayor Nutter, L&I Commissioner Carlton Williams, Fire Commissioner Derrick Sawyer, and others, also appeared to serve as a forum to bolster Williams as he and his beleaguered department weather a barrage of criticism.
NEWS
May 7, 2015 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The city has ordered the reinspection of scores of buildings that were originally examined by inexperienced and uncertified inspectors from the Philadelphia Department of Licenses and Inspections. The action comes after The Inquirer reported in March that L&I sent out uncertified inspectors to conduct 600 inspections on buildings throughout the city that had been declared unsafe - either badly damaged or deteriorated. State officials said later in March that any of the original inspections of 181 buildings that fell under the Pennsylvania Uniform Construction Code (UCC)
NEWS
April 25, 2015 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A four-story building in North Philadelphia that is home to eight Temple University students was built illegally - without the required safety inspections or even a building permit, city records show. The tan-brick building at 1806 W. Montgomery Ave., constructed within the last two years, is owned by 826 N. Broad L.L.C. Shawn Bullard, a real estate developer from West Oak Lane, is the sole member of that company, real estate records show. Bullard, 33, is a former Temple football player who had a short stint in the NFL and this year starred as a bachelor looking for love in the WE TV reality show Match Made in Heaven.
NEWS
April 22, 2015 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer| narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
A MAN STOOD on Mount Ephraim Avenue in Camden clutching an umbrella, unaware that several Philadelphia City Council members were watching him from another part of the city in a dark room full of computer monitors. Council President Darrell Clarke had led the journey over the Ben Franklin Bridge to Camden yesterday morning to check the Camden County Police Department's nerve center, its Real-Time Tactical Operations and Information Center, where a network of cameras and hidden microphones is monitored like something out of a spy thriller.
NEWS
March 31, 2015 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Many dangerous and unsafe buildings that should be inspected every 10 to 30 days have not been seen by inspectors from the Department of Licenses and Inspections in years, The Inquirer has learned. At the same time, the agency's Construction Site Task Force has been so adept at fining contractors for violations such as failing to display permits or update insurance in the city computer system, builders complain, that L&I is delaying construction while city building is booming. Critics of the beleaguered agency say that proves it is on the wrong track, with safety taking a backseat to the exigencies of collecting cash and flexing its muscle over comparatively minor infractions.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most of the 600 inspections of unsafe buildings performed by a group of inexperienced and uncertified inspectors for the Department of Licenses and Inspections last month appear to be invalid, The Inquirer has learned. In an e-mail Wednesday, officials of the state's Department of Labor and Industry said that inspections that follow the tenets of the Pennsylvania Uniform Construction Code must be performed by a person certified under the UCC. "Any UCC inspection not performed by a UCC-certified individual is not valid," Department of Labor and Industry officials concluded.
NEWS
March 25, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Having endured only the latest round of unflattering reviews following the deadly building collapse at 22d and Market Streets in 2013, Philadelphia's Department of Licenses and Inspections should be approaching its crucial and daunting task with that much more care and caution. That is not the impression left by the revelation that hundreds of inspections were conducted by trainees who lacked required credentials. About 600 inspections conducted one week last month were performed by newly hired, uncertified employees but recorded under the name of a single experienced inspector, The Inquirer's Alfred Lubrano reported Monday.
NEWS
March 24, 2015 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A group of inexperienced and uncertified inspectors for the Department of Licenses and Inspections conducted around 600 inspections of unsafe buildings in a single week last month, The Inquirer has learned. Each of the nine newly hired inspectors then recorded their work in L&I's database under the name of another man, an experienced inspector with the agency. L&I officials say the inspections were part of a training exercise for the rookies. The inspections, from Feb. 9 through 13, were performed the same week City Controller Alan Butkovitz released a report criticizing L&I for not inspecting unsafe buildings - those that are badly damaged or deteriorated - in a timely manner.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2015
Bryn Mawr Bank Corp. , Bryn Mawr, has elected Michael Clement and John May to its board. They had served as directors of Continental Bank Holdings Inc., which Bryn Mawr Bank Corp. acquired on Jan. 1. Clement is a partner with the law firm Wisler, Pearlstine, Talone, Garrity & Potash L.L.P. May is a partner in the corporate and securities department of Pepper Hamilton L.L.P. The University City District has named the following board members: Jamie Gauthier , executive director of the Sustainable Business Network and president of the Garden Court Community Association; Tom Klaritch , executive vice president of HCP; Mark Mills , president of the Metropolis Group; Joe Reagan , vice president-development at Wexford Science & Technologies; Joe Ritchie , vice president of development at Brandywine Realty Trust; and Joe Vitali , vice president of finance and administration at the University of the Sciences.
NEWS
February 23, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
It's 9:30 a.m. and Allison Ford, 24, a pastry chef at Vedge , a vegan restaurant in Philadelphia, is working on a host of exotic ice cream bases that include black pepper, Black Forest cake, and smoked walnut. Moving along a spotless surface, Ford shuttles among blender, stove, and ice cream maker, her movements economical and precise. Around her, the restaurant gleams - all polished glass, lustrous wood, and copper fixtures. "Here's the thing," says Rich Landau, 47, owner of Vedge and the recently opened V Street with his wife, Kate Jacoby, 35, who live in Philadelphia.
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