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Installment Plan

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NEWS
February 15, 1990 | By Patrick Scott, Special to The Inquirer
Some Marple Township senior citizens will be allowed to pay their real estate tax bill in installments, the township Board of Commissioners has decided. The board also agreed to look into drafting an ordinance that would make all residents eligible for the installment plan. The board Monday approved by a 6-1 vote the ordinance to help senior citizens after some commissioners said it would discriminate against younger township residents on fixed incomes. Residents 62 and older with an annual household income of $15,000 or less will be allowed to pay their tax bills this year on May 7, June 6 and Aug. 6 rather than in one lump sum at the beginning of the year.
NEWS
May 6, 1993 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
County officials struggling to stretch their dollars in preserving open space and farmland may wind up creating yet another bureaucracy to comply with state law. It would be known as the Chester County Open Space Preservation Authority, and a hearing on an ordinance to create this authority could come as early as June 1. According to commissioners' assistant Molly Morrison, such an authority might be the only way the county can purchase farmland...
NEWS
August 14, 2000 | By Kate Herman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Property owners in the rapidly growing Garnet Valley School District will be able to pay their taxes on the installment plan as the school board tries to lessen the effect of a tax increase this year that averages $700. The tax hike results from a budget increase of about 23 percent - from $28,023,081 to $34,500,622 - which reflects the cost of a series of construction projects to make room for as many as 300 new students a year. The new average tax bill - $3,685.58, up from $2,986 last year - is also a result of a recent countywide reassessment in Delaware County.
NEWS
February 1, 2001 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For many years, John Wenger ran a dairy operation on his West Caln farm, before illness forced him to sell his herd and left him needing to use a wheelchair. His income is limited, but he is sitting on a gold mine - 61 acres of prime land, for which a developer has offered him an "outrageous amount. " Wenger said he would rather sell the development rights on his farm to the county than sell out to a developer. On Tuesday night, he heard about an option that fits his needs perfectly - selling the development rights on the installment plan.
NEWS
October 18, 1990 | By Patrick Scott, Special to The Inquirer
Marple Township officials have proposed allowing all residents making less than $15,000 to pay their taxes on the installment plan. Since February, residents 62 and older with that income have been eligible for the three-payment installment plan. Commissioner Barry Dozor, who drafted the original plan, proposed on Oct. 8 that the plan be amended to include all residents at or below that income level. Two months after the April 1 deadline to sign up for the installment plan, township tax collector Joseph Herm reported that one person had inquired about the plan but had chosen not to use it. The lack of interest was the result of the commissioners' passing the measure a month before tax bills were sent out, and the township's failure to advertise the plan, Dozor and other officials said.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1994 | by Randolph Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
A plan to lighten January's high energy bills turned into an overload for about 1,900 PECO Energy Co. customers. Faced with sky-high bills for January's record freeze, they jumped at PECO's offer to pay only 70 percent of what they owed and defer the rest for three months, without paying interest. Instead, some wound up paying the entire balance for January, plus an overcharge equal to the first installment on the portion that PECO was supposed to defer, according to a Philadelphia consumer group.
NEWS
April 14, 1991 | By David T. Shaw, Special to The Inquirer
The Downingtown school board Wednesday revised its collection procedure to permit property owners to pay taxes in installments rather than in one lump sum. Andrew Harden, vice president, said he and other board members were motivated to make the changes to help out senior citizens and low-income taxpayers who might have trouble making the larger single payment. Harden also said the board had considered granting some type of discount to older and poorer taxpayers. But legally, Harden said, it would be discriminatory to give such discounts to any special group.
NEWS
June 28, 1990 | By Patrick Scott, Special to The Inquirer
When the April 1 deadline for participating in Marple Township's new property tax installment plan for seniors came and went, only one person had called. And that taxpayer chose not to use the plan. "It was a good idea," tax collector Joseph Herm said. "It was meant to help. But obviously it didn't catch on. " Herm said he "didn't know what to expect" after the ordinance was adopted in February, allowing residents 62 and older whose annual incomes do not exceed $15,000 to pay their real estate taxes in three installments rather than one lump sum. "I couldn't even argue with anybody, they just didn't call," he said in an interview last week.
NEWS
May 14, 1992 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Taxpayers in the Great Valley School District may get relief from lump-sum property-tax payments. The school board is considering adopting a proposal that will allow residents to pay their 1992-93 school taxes in three installments. Charles E. Linderman, the district's director of business affairs, said the board was responding to Malvern property owners seeking relief from the current collection procedure. Linderman said for the property assessed at the district average of $12,000, the property owner paid $1,571 in taxes this year.
NEWS
February 8, 1990 | By Patrick Scott, Special to The Inquirer
A proposal to allow some senior citizens in Marple Township to pay their real estate taxes in three installments could win approval Monday. The ordinance, proposed in December by township Commissioner Barry Dozor, would let seniors pay real estate taxes in installments rather than a lump sum. Dozor offered the ordinance in response to a 15 percent increase in real estate taxes adopted for this year. According to a draft of the ordinance presented Monday at the Board of Commissioners work session, residents 62 and older with an annual household income of $15,000 or less would be eligible for the installment plan.
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NEWS
July 27, 2013
Learning on the installment plan Oregon state officials have taken a bold step toward solving the tuition problem for students trying to attend public universities. With the state's new "Pay it Forward, Pay it Back" plan, approved this month, needy students will pay nothing while in school, and then only 3 percent of their income for the next two decades after getting a four-year degree. Those who attend for a shorter time would pay a prorated amount. Although this plan is in use in other countries, it has never been tried here.
NEWS
January 14, 2005 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Former New Jersey Gov. Jim Florio's tax-collection firm can temporarily stop accepting installment-plan applications from Camden property owners who are behind in their taxes. The moratorium, approved last night by Camden City Council, means that property owners who want to set up installment plans for back taxes may have to wait as long as 75 days to do so. Officials said that no properties would be seized for nonpayment during that period. The down time is to allow Xpand, Florio's firm, to complete the paperwork for a new trust to oversee tax liens in Camden.
SPORTS
July 17, 2003 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
The Flyers put their season tickets and game plans on sale yesterday at last year's prices and offered potential buyers a first-ever six-month payment plan. That option is available to season-ticket holders who pay using a major credit card. The Flyers will charge the ticket holder's card once a month beginning in July. Available season tickets on the mezzanine level start at $33.50 per seat per game for rows 12 through 15 and $47 each for rows 7 through 11. All ticket prices are the same as last year's, the team said.
NEWS
September 20, 2002 | By Clea Benson INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Attempting to guarantee that their constituents would never again be jolted by large, unexpected property-tax hikes, City Council members yesterday introduced bills capping the percentage the levy could increase each year. One proposal, authored by Council President Anna C. Verna and Councilman Michael Nutter, would allow annual increases of no more than 10 percent a year. Another, written by Councilman Brian O'Neill, would allow increases of no more than 4 percent a year. The bills joined the avalanche of legislation Council members have introduced in the past two weeks to soothe angry homeowners - despite questions about whether they really have power over the property-tax system.
NEWS
February 19, 2002 | By Susan Weidener INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
While Rachael and Jenna are being fed, Faith is getting her diaper changed. Zachary and Kaitlyn nap in the crib. Life has settled into a routine of sorts in the two months since the Brown quintuplets - now almost 4 months old - were brought home from Lankenau Hospital right before Christmas. For now, at least, it's shift work. The babies sleep in shifts, eat in shifts, are changed and cuddled in shifts. Caring for the quintuplets has become an exercise in organization, cooperation and help - lots of it - from relatives and volunteers who generously give their time and money, parents Jeffrey and Jennifer Brown said.
NEWS
February 1, 2001 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For many years, John Wenger ran a dairy operation on his West Caln farm, before illness forced him to sell his herd and left him needing to use a wheelchair. His income is limited, but he is sitting on a gold mine - 61 acres of prime land, for which a developer has offered him an "outrageous amount. " Wenger said he would rather sell the development rights on his farm to the county than sell out to a developer. On Tuesday night, he heard about an option that fits his needs perfectly - selling the development rights on the installment plan.
NEWS
September 8, 2000 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Counties in Pennsylvania now have another weapon to use in their battle to preserve farmland - the installment plan. Under a program developed by the state Department of Agriculture's Bureau of Farmland Preservation, counties now can buy development rights over a period that could stretch out for as long as 30 years. During that time, farmers who enter into an installment purchase agreement would earn tax-free interest, and can defer paying capital-gains tax until they receive a lump-sum payment at the end of the agreement.
NEWS
August 14, 2000 | By Kate Herman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Property owners in the rapidly growing Garnet Valley School District will be able to pay their taxes on the installment plan as the school board tries to lessen the effect of a tax increase this year that averages $700. The tax hike results from a budget increase of about 23 percent - from $28,023,081 to $34,500,622 - which reflects the cost of a series of construction projects to make room for as many as 300 new students a year. The new average tax bill - $3,685.58, up from $2,986 last year - is also a result of a recent countywide reassessment in Delaware County.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1994 | by Randolph Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
A plan to lighten January's high energy bills turned into an overload for about 1,900 PECO Energy Co. customers. Faced with sky-high bills for January's record freeze, they jumped at PECO's offer to pay only 70 percent of what they owed and defer the rest for three months, without paying interest. Instead, some wound up paying the entire balance for January, plus an overcharge equal to the first installment on the portion that PECO was supposed to defer, according to a Philadelphia consumer group.
NEWS
May 6, 1993 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
County officials struggling to stretch their dollars in preserving open space and farmland may wind up creating yet another bureaucracy to comply with state law. It would be known as the Chester County Open Space Preservation Authority, and a hearing on an ordinance to create this authority could come as early as June 1. According to commissioners' assistant Molly Morrison, such an authority might be the only way the county can purchase farmland...
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