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Instant Messaging

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BUSINESS
June 21, 2001 | By Martha Woodall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It has become a nightly ritual: Around 7 p.m., Erika Goldberg, 12, of Jenkintown, hops onto the family PC. Homework? The beginnings of a term paper? Sometimes. But Erika also is a devotee of "instant messaging," the high-tech form of communication practiced by millions of teens and preteens. Less intimate than a phone call but more interactive than traditional e-mail, instant messaging clearly has taken hold. According to a report released yesterday by the Pew Internet & American Life Project, "IM-ing" has become indispensable to nearly 13 million teens who rely on the techno-communication tool to bolster relationships with friends who live far away or who sit next to them in math class.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2006 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Vince Cignarella says his teenage daughter isn't impressed by the high-stakes currency trades he makes from Sovereign Bank's subterranean trading room. "She says we just instant-message people all day. And, you know, we do," Cignarella said Wednesday, tapping his computer keyboard and swiveling among three monitors flashing multiple data screens from Bloomberg and Reuters, and zipping price gossip to traders in New York, Toronto and other cities. But it's not idle chat. There's a lot riding on the questions and answers that securities and currency traders like Cignarella and his colleagues send around the globe every weekday and weeknight.
NEWS
February 16, 2005 | By Janice Hatfield Young
Back in the dark ages of communication, when teenagers wanted to talk to their friends they often tied up their parents' phone lines with endless conversations. Eventually, phone companies capitalized on parents' frustration and offered the "teen line" - a second household phone line - to keep peace in American families. Today's teenagers may be tying up their parents' phone lines, too, but chances are that, rather than chatting on a second telephone, they are instant messaging their friends via the Internet.
NEWS
August 17, 2006 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From a cyber-perspective, 11-year-old Ben Winebrake learned to sprint before he could crawl. The middle-school student from Upper Dublin got his first home computer in May and immediately began instant-messaging his friends two or three times a day. Has he ever e-mailed anyone? "Hmm," he muses. "I don't think so. " You can take that as a no. For anyone under 25, e-mail, though still used by many, is rapidly becoming relegated to stodgier purposes such as applying to schools, contacting a teacher or professor about an assignment, or thanking a grandmother for the birthday check.
NEWS
February 21, 2006 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Back in the Stone Age, that is, the 1990s, if a young man wanted to date a young woman, he had to work through her parents: Call the house, be polite when mom or dad answered the phone, make small talk when he arrived at their door. No more. These days, technology is excising parents from the equation - and they don't like it a bit. Today the interaction is more often conducted teen to teen via cell phone, text messaging, and instant messaging. That makes it harder for parents to know who their kids are spending time with - not just as dates, but as friends.
NEWS
May 28, 2002
Hey, kids, let's go hang out at the government Internet kids' site. There's neat stuff there like . . . no chat rooms, no instant messaging - in fact, not much of anything that's interactive. But it's OK because it's safer for us. So let's go log on! Now, back to the real world . . . where it's not so easy to protect the young from the unsavory images and would-be predators online. Take current congressional efforts to create a new corner of the Internet for kid-friendly Web sites.
NEWS
June 9, 2011 | Associated Press
HARRISBURG - A bill that would impose a $100 fine on drivers in Pennsylvania for using wireless devices or talking on cellphones without a hands-free device passed the state Senate yesterday, as legislators try to wrap up a debate that dragged on for years in the Legislature. The bill, which passed, 41-8, goes to the House of Representatives, where a similar bill is being considered. House Majority Leader Mike Turzai, R-Allegheny, hopes to get a bill out of that chamber by the end of June, a spokesman said.
NEWS
June 25, 2012
Ala., Fla. coasts warned on storm NEW ORLEANS - Parts of two states were under a tropical storm warning Sunday as Debby churned off the Gulf Coast, leaving wary residents to closely watch a storm whose path has so far been difficult to forecast. Warnings were issued for coastal Alabama and parts of Florida, including the Panhandle. Debby already had dumped heavy rain on parts of Florida and spawned isolated tornadoes, causing damage to homes and knocking down power lines. It was not completely clear when or where the storm would make landfall.
NEWS
November 11, 2000
PlayStation 2. Palm Pilot. Instant messaging. High speed wireless Web connection. MP3. Gigahertz microprocessor. DVD. HDTV. X Box. If you're proud owner or operator of any of the above - or long to be - it's time to unplug and experience another kind of digital technology: what the 10 digits of the human hand are capable of creating. You'll find it at the Convention Center, at the Philadelphia Museum of Art Crafts Show, closing tomorrow. These are not your father's macrame plant hangers, but exquisitely rendered jewelry, carvings, weavings, pottery and more, celebrating individual expression.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1999 | Daily News staff and wire reports
BROKERAGES Father & son accused of $60M fraud A Bala Cynwyd brokerage operated by a father and son defrauded 7,000 investors of $60 million by selling them unsecured debt obligations that were advertised as being safe investments, the Securities and Exchange Commission alleges in a lawsuit. The lawsuit accuses William S. Shapiro, 75, owner of Welco Securities, and his son, Kenneth Shapiro, 46, president of the company, of suggesting in advertisements on kiosks in airports, bus stations and other public places that the speculative investments were as safe as bank certificates of deposit.
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NEWS
June 25, 2012
Ala., Fla. coasts warned on storm NEW ORLEANS - Parts of two states were under a tropical storm warning Sunday as Debby churned off the Gulf Coast, leaving wary residents to closely watch a storm whose path has so far been difficult to forecast. Warnings were issued for coastal Alabama and parts of Florida, including the Panhandle. Debby already had dumped heavy rain on parts of Florida and spawned isolated tornadoes, causing damage to homes and knocking down power lines. It was not completely clear when or where the storm would make landfall.
NEWS
June 7, 2012 | By Carolyn Davis and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Meredith Cruse had just finished practicing with her new softball team, and she didn't want to stick around for the game. She walked over to the bleachers where her mother sat, looking for a way out, looking for solace. "I didn't want to play because I didn't know anyone and I was sad," recalls the 12-year-old from Burlington. Her mother, Jody, encouraged her to give the team a try — and Meredith did. She ended up having a good time, and kept playing. It was a moment of triumphant connection shared by daughter and mother, one that came through direct contact rather than on an electronic device.
BUSINESS
June 5, 2012 | Diane Mastrull
As a teenager doing freelance web design, Chris Nagele was a workplace free spirit. His office was wherever he could plug in a computer. That's precisely how his company, Wildbit, would continue to function for 11 years as it evolved from consulting to now exclusively building software. "We were doing the virtual company thing," recalled Nagele, now 32. Then, about a year ago, came a dramatic philosophical shift. He and his business partner and wife, Natalie, wanted to be with their employees, not just communicate with them via the phone or computer.
NEWS
June 9, 2011 | Associated Press
HARRISBURG - A bill that would impose a $100 fine on drivers in Pennsylvania for using wireless devices or talking on cellphones without a hands-free device passed the state Senate yesterday, as legislators try to wrap up a debate that dragged on for years in the Legislature. The bill, which passed, 41-8, goes to the House of Representatives, where a similar bill is being considered. House Majority Leader Mike Turzai, R-Allegheny, hopes to get a bill out of that chamber by the end of June, a spokesman said.
NEWS
May 31, 2011 | By DAN GERINGER, geringd@phillynews.com 215-854-5961
It shattered nerves but no windows, and left residents near Franklin Mills Mall feeling all shook up Friday night - but there is no "I Survived the Great Earthquake of 2011" T-shirt, and there's no reason to panic in the streets of Northeast Philadelphia. Geophysicists at the U.S. Geological Survey's National Earthquake Information Center in Golden, Colo., did not classify Philly's 1.7-scale tremor as an earthquake until Saturday, when a small regional agency - the Lamont-Doherty Cooperative Seismographic Network - informed them that it was a "micro" quake on the Richter magnitude scale.
NEWS
September 20, 2010
By Marie Hardin While the misdeeds of high-profile athletes, actors, and politicians have made headlines this year, as they usually do, the misdeeds of organizations have been the most consequential and likely to reverberate into the future. There's little need to review the well-documented missteps of BP, Toyota, Goldman Sachs, Massey Energy, and others. You're likely familiar with these companies for reasons they'd rather you weren't. Each company's mishandling of its situation has led business and public-relations experts to search for answers about what's wrong with corporate America.
NEWS
January 3, 2010 | By John Timpane INQUIRER STAFF INQUIRER
Facebook. Twitter. MySpace. Cell phones. Blogs. Time thieves, all of them. Or at least that's how they've sometimes been portrayed in news media, common lore, and even the occasional scholarly study. Not the real thing, not really human contact. Trivial, superficial connections that take up time we once spent with real friends, family, community. Americans are already isolated enough: We're the lonely crowd. We bowl alone. Social media just add to the Great American Isolation, right?
NEWS
July 30, 2009 | By Megan DeMarco INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Organizers of a cyber-bullying conference in Gloucester County yesterday set the tone by showing the movie Sticks and Stones. In it, the popular Lindsay and loner Brandon share a high school English class. Though they rarely speak to each other, they exchange text messages in class and instant messages late at night. But when Lindsay's boyfriend gets into her computer, he sends a humiliating picture of Brandon to the entire school. One night he even messages Brandon from Lindsay's screen name, pretending to be her. When Brandon confesses his love, she tells him to "just disappear.
SPORTS
March 24, 2009 | By TED SILARY, silaryt@phillynews.com
Maalik Wayns couldn't help but scream in delight. He treasured that play in the second round of the NCAA Tournament when Villanova's Dwayne Anderson made a headlong dive, in transition, to knock the ball free from a UCLA player. No. 1, he recognized the effort as simply tremendous. No. 2 . . . "I knew coach [Jay] Wright would love it," he said. "That's the kind of stuff that matters the most to him. "I was standing up for that one. And yelling, 'Yeah! Let's go!
NEWS
December 13, 2007 | By RANDI BOYETTE
IN the blink of an eye or, more precisely, the click of a mouse - a family was destroyed. Last year, 13-year-old Megan Meier made friends online with a boy named Josh Evans. He seemed to like her - a very big deal to Megan. The, one day, Josh turned on her. "I don't know if I want to be friends with you anymore because I've heard that you are not very nice to your friends. " Soon, "Josh" was spreading rumors and people were posting online notices calling her fat, and a slut, the Associated Press reported.
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