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Instinct

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SPORTS
January 14, 1987 | By KEVIN MULLIGAN, Daily News Sports Writer
You might have heard that the University of Pennsylvania held a lead last evening at the Palestra. You should have heard that the Quakers held one, lost one, held one, lost another one, then held a lead for good in a 94-85 victory over St. Francis College (Pa.). Leads and the Quakers have not been a happy marriage this college basketball season. They mutually filed for divorce Friday night in Cambridge, Mass., after Penn blew a 64-45 lead and fell to lowly Harvard, 93-91, in overtime.
NEWS
April 10, 1989 | By JEFF GREENFIELD
I have come to think of it as the Disney World March: the adult, wearing shirts and shorts emblazoned with Disney characters, shoulder sagging from the weight of still cameras, video cameras, carryalls and pocketbooks, trudging endlessly through the Magic Kingdom. Also on his (or her) shoulders is borne the weight of a child: some sleeping; some, with boundless energy, urging their parent on to the next diversion; some wailing with hunger, thirst, weariness, or a special combination that, sooner or later, appears to drive every parent here into threats which, in other arenas, would draw the suspicious attention of a child-abuse-prevention agent.
BUSINESS
June 5, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Even in high school, Kathleen Brown McHale, now 62, found herself drawn to her classmates with developmental disabilities. "I volunteered - at lunch, I was with the kids that had development disabilities," said Brown McHale, president and chief executive of Special People in Northeast Inc. (SPIN), a Philadelphia nonprofit that provides life-long services, including residential care to people with intellectual, developmental and autism disabilities. It also offers early childhood services, and especially important in the summer, a camp for people with special needs.
NEWS
June 4, 1999 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
After starting out with "Cool Runnings" and "3 Ninjas," director Jon Turteltaub has become something of a specialist in movies about New Age messiahs. His big hit, "Phenomenon," starred John Travolta as an ordinary guy who is struck with a beam of light that makes him a sensitive genius, plugged in to the secrets of life and the natural world. Turteltaub's latest, "Instinct," probes the mind of a batty primatologist (Anthony Hopkins) who goes from studying apes to living with them, and who then kills several Africans who meddle with his adopted ape colony.
NEWS
March 25, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
THE TITLE creature in "How to Train Your Dragon" is an object lesson in how to entrance a young audience with animation. The movie itself is a pleasant time killer with a stock story and characters, but its dragon is a triumph of conception and design - part beast and part Stealth bomber. Sleek, black, medieval in origin, space-age in design and movement (best seen in 3-D). It's wounded and then befriended by a Viking boy named Hiccup (Jay Baruchel), who's been raised by his warlike father (Gerard Butler)
NEWS
February 3, 1992 | By Joe Santoliquito, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
James Gordy scrunched up his face and peered through squinting eyes every time he passed a Sleighton School player. The junior forward collected 18 points and 21 rebounds in the Clippers' 77-68 nonleague victory on Wednesday night at Chester - and he did it with his vision slightly impaired. "I can't see that far away, and I didn't have my contacts in because they were too dirty," Gordy explained. "I was playing everything off instinct. " Gordy's instinct helped the Clippers pull their overall record even at 8-8. The win also was Chester's second straight in what has been something of a disappointing season.
NEWS
October 21, 1994 | BY GERALD K. McOSCAR
Two thousand years ago, the Greek philosopher Epicurus mused that "sexual intercourse never did a man any good, and he is lucky if it has not harmed him. " Prophetic words indeed in light of the O.J. Simpson tragedy. These enigmatic words caught the attention of a grizzled veteran of the battle of the sexes, one who has succumbed too often and perhaps too willingly to the charms of the gentler sex, and who has the lacerated soul to prove it. The idea of sexual abstinence sounds quaintly archaic, and even in ancient times (before the 1960s)
NEWS
September 13, 2001 | By Barbara Boyer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a calm and subdued voice, Police Commissioner John F. Timoney yesterday described how his department is responding to Tuesday's terrorist attacks and told how the tragedy took a personal toll as well. Timoney - a former high-ranking New York City police official - showed a rarely seen side as he talked about losing close friends this week and recalled images of the 1993 World Trade Center bombing when he was working in New York. The commissioner said he had a young nephew whom he persuaded to join the New York City Police Department after graduating from Catholic College.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Any artistic cutting edge can come with the sensation of falling off a cliff. The listener is bewildered for a bit, until someone (often the composer) shows how the most forbidding concoctions have precedents in the past. Rarely, though, has the road map to such precedents been established with the concrete as it was in a talk before Bhob Rainey's Axon Ladder Friday at Vox Populi. Was this an advanced calculus class? At the same time such well-known composers as Stephen Hartke and Louis Karchin unveiled their response to the visual stimuli at the Barnes Foundation in a Network for New Music concert, Rainey was at the gallery wrestling with music based on mathematical abstractions of squid neurons so big they were studied in the pre-high-tech era. Some skepticism is warranted - attention-grabbing concepts don't necessarily unleash worthy music.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2010
ARIES (March 21-April 19). Even if you are not in medicine, you will contribute to another person's health. You will do something positive for the well-being of those around you. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). Hindsight isn't always 20/20. Sometimes it's much, much better than that. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). Materialism is a dangerous system of values. Steer away from narrow and shallow measures of wealth. CANCER (June 22-July 22). You are not your job. You know this, yet it is extremely difficult on days like today for you to separate your identity.
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NEWS
July 10, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Question: How do you know if you have good instincts when it comes to trusting people? I like to pride myself on that, and I'm sure I've been duped no more than the average person. But after a recent duping, I'm finding most romantic interests (or women in general, really) untrustworthy, and I back away. How do I know if I'm being paranoid or just ran into a bunch of shady romantic prospects? Answer: Whenever you have trouble with all [group name here], it isn't about [group name here]
BUSINESS
June 5, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Even in high school, Kathleen Brown McHale, now 62, found herself drawn to her classmates with developmental disabilities. "I volunteered - at lunch, I was with the kids that had development disabilities," said Brown McHale, president and chief executive of Special People in Northeast Inc. (SPIN), a Philadelphia nonprofit that provides life-long services, including residential care to people with intellectual, developmental and autism disabilities. It also offers early childhood services, and especially important in the summer, a camp for people with special needs.
SPORTS
April 27, 2016 | By Matt Gelb, STAFF WRITER
The colored charts and graphs occupied a corner of Pete Mackanin's desk, and the 64-year-old baseball lifer inspected them on a recent afternoon. Spray charts. Hot zones. Swing tendencies. Pitch percentages. Those items were not always prioritized on the ground floor of Citizens Bank Park in previous seasons. "Numbers are important. Statistics matter," the Phillies manager said. "The new wave of analytics just delves deeper. " Baseball is awash with more information than ever, although it is still unclear what big data's place will be inside the Phillies clubhouse.
NEWS
December 27, 2015 | By Carolyn Hax
While I'm away, readers celebrate mothers-in-law. I was in a marriage that ended sadly but amicably. I've kept in touch with my mother-in-law, with whom I had become quite close, in spite of the fact that we were two very different women. About two years ago, I was going through a difficult financial and emotional time. I don't know if she heard through my ex-husband or just sensed it, but she knew I needed help. She sent me an email: "When you and [son] parted ways, you asked me to hold on to your engagement ring.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Any artistic cutting edge can come with the sensation of falling off a cliff. The listener is bewildered for a bit, until someone (often the composer) shows how the most forbidding concoctions have precedents in the past. Rarely, though, has the road map to such precedents been established with the concrete as it was in a talk before Bhob Rainey's Axon Ladder Friday at Vox Populi. Was this an advanced calculus class? At the same time such well-known composers as Stephen Hartke and Louis Karchin unveiled their response to the visual stimuli at the Barnes Foundation in a Network for New Music concert, Rainey was at the gallery wrestling with music based on mathematical abstractions of squid neurons so big they were studied in the pre-high-tech era. Some skepticism is warranted - attention-grabbing concepts don't necessarily unleash worthy music.
SPORTS
December 28, 2014 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
By the time he traded for Eli Manning at the 2004 NFL draft, Ernie Accorsi was already an old newspaper guy and knew how the game worked. A former sportswriter at The Inquirer, Accorsi was the New York Giants' general manager from 1998 to 2007, and his signature decision over that period was to bank that, in a draft class that included Philip Rivers and Ben Roethlisberger, Manning was the true crown jewel. "I remember the Harrisburg paper - it's my local paper, where I grew up - said, 'Accorsi bets his future on Eli Manning,' " Accorsi, a native of Hershey, said in a recent phone interview.
NEWS
April 17, 2013 | By David A. Fahrenthold, Washington Post
BOSTON - Carlos Arredondo ran across Boylston Street, jumped the security fence and landed in the middle of fallen bodies. Two women lay motionless. Another woman was standing, frozen, looking down at the wounded and repeating, "Oh my God. " Arredondo had come to the Boston Marathon to watch National Guardsmen run the race in honor of fallen soldiers, including the son Arredondo lost in Iraq. He carried a camera and a small American flag. On the other side of the fence now, he dropped the flag.
SPORTS
October 30, 2012 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Analytics, all the rage all over the NBA, use data on player movement, even player speed on the court, plus efficiencies based on all sorts of variables, such as shooting percentages off dribbles, from certain spots on the floor, from passes by specific players. 76ers coach Doug Collins was asked the other day if he was an analytics guy. "No. If I did that, I'd blow my brains out," Collins said after a practice last week. "There's 20-page printouts after every game - I would kill myself.
NEWS
September 26, 2012
By Harold I. Gullan OK, now we've seen and heard it all. Those over-wrought pep rallies for the already committed zealots still called political conventions are finally over. The deluge of media promotion to come isn't going to tell us anything new about any of the candidates. Accordingly, I invite you, my thoughtful fellow voters, to join me in a reflective retreat. No, we can't put our lives on hold. But we can, to the extent possible, try to tune out everything political (that is, partisan)
SPORTS
February 27, 2012 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writer
INDIANAPOLIS - Linebacker Luke Kuechly has been called a possible "slam dunk" for the Eagles (Mike Mayock, NFL Network), the "perfect first-round melding of team need and draft slot value" (Don Banks, SI.com) and has been linked to Philadelphia in countless mock drafts. He was scheduled to meet with the Eagles here at the NFL combine Sunday night, though teams meet with dozens of players they won't draft and sometimes never meet ones they do take. But as fans look ahead to April's draft, Kuechly, from Boston College, said he's trying to stay focused on the combine.
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