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Insulin

NEWS
August 9, 1997 | By Robert A. Rankin, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Michelle Puczynski, 13, of Sylvania, Ohio, has endured 13,000 insulin injections and 21,000 finger-pricks for blood work since being diagnosed as a diabetic at age 1. "She has been robbed of a carefree and normal life. . . . Until today, I could never assure Michelle that a cure was within her grasp," said her mother, Sandra Puczynski. "On behalf of Michelle, thank you President Clinton and Speaker [Newt] Gingrich. " Puczynski's words helped define the human consequences of a little-noted aspect of the budget that Clinton signed into law Tuesday: a $2.4 billion expansion of federal spending on treatment and research for diabetes.
NEWS
November 18, 2005 | By Christine Schiavo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nearly a year after Jean Saxon moved out of a rented Levittown home, her landlord discovered a syringe in the base of the toilet - a find the prosecution in Saxon's murder trial presented in Bucks County Court yesterday as the case's smoking gun. Edmund Armstrong said he found the syringe after taking the toilet apart to see why it repeatedly clogged. He called a Bensalem detective to retrieve it. Saxon, 46, is charged with the murder of her estranged husband, Jerry, 52, who lapsed into a coma on March 17, 2003, and died five weeks later.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2011
"WE DON'T get fat because we overeat; we overeat because we're getting fat. " So says Gary Taubes, author of the buzzed-about book "Why We Get Fat and What to Do About It" (Borzoi Books, $24.95). Taubes argues that what we've been told for more than 50 years about fat accumulation and weight loss is all wrong ! He unequivocally rejects the "calories-in/calories out" approach, the conventional weight-loss wisdom of "eat less/move more. " We've been following that faulty theory for years with obviously disastrous results, he says.
NEWS
February 23, 2001 | by Amy Joy Lanou and A.R. Hogan
To give the authors of "Eat this steak!" (Op-ed Feb. 5) due credit, they got one thing quite right - the federal Food Guide Pyramid heavily suffers from industry taint and poorly serves the public-health interest. However, quite contrary to Michael and Mary Dan Eades' assertions of grain bias, it's the politically well-connected dairy, meat and egg industries whose clout dominates and skewers the 9-year-old Food Pyramid. For starters, its release was delayed one year until April 1992, and its contents diluted, under intense pressure from animal agribusiness interests.
LIVING
February 15, 1987 | By Pat Croce, Special to The Inquirer
Call it the disorder of the decade. You've certainly read about it. You've probably discussed it with friends. And chances are, amid the hoopla, you have wondered if you, too, have hypoglycemia. Why the hype about hypoglycemia? Because it has become a catch-all diagnosis for myriad problems related to low blood sugar. For the last decade, the public has been deluged with reports listing the symptoms associated with the condition. Before you could say, "Get me to a doctor, quick," plenty of people who occasionally felt even the slightest sign of dizziness, nausea or fatigue were convinced that they were victims of hypoglycemia.
NEWS
February 11, 1995
The nation's honeymoon with pasta is, tragically, coming to an end. The romance between ourselves and the noodle, to paraphrase Cole Porter, was too hot not to cool down. Recent studies suggest that too much pasta can make you fat, especially those who are "insulin-resistant" - another word for those who tend to be chubby. The study said pasta makes your body over-produce insulin, a hormone used to digest starches and sugary treats. The more insulin your body produces, the more likely it is to be eventually converted into famine insurance on hips, potbellies and thighs.
LIVING
September 25, 1995 | By Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The medical researchers are closing in day by day, like detectives on the trail of an elusive criminal. Five years ago, they followed their suspect into a microscopic world, to part of a single chromosome. Then, six months ago, while looking for more clues, they walked across the culprit's neighborhood, gene by gene. Now, the search is door to door, say researchers at the Coriell Institute for Medical Research in Camden, who are hunting for the gene or genes on Chromosome 6 that protect people from developing diabetes.
NEWS
September 18, 1991 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
EYE OF THE BEHOLDER Some of you - including a sizable fraction of those who have had elective plastic surgery - may be suffering from delusions of imagined ugliness. A report in The American Journal of Psychiatry says "body dismorphic disorder" is characterized by obsession with imagined flaws such as an overly large nose, "devious-looking" eyebrows, a "stretched" mouth or undersized genitals. Severe depression, suicidal behavior, social withdrawal, repeated visits to plastic surgeons and "frequent mirror checking" are common symptoms.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2008 | By BECKY BATCHA, batchab@phillynews.com 215-854-5757
BERNARDET Cash was diagnosed with diabetes 14 months ago, which shook the 48-year-old from West Philly to the core. "I was scared," she says. "I was so much into denial - and depressed for a little while - but then I said, 'This is part of life and you have to deal with it.' "I'm a strong woman," Cash says. "You cry it out a little bit, then you get over it. " She had plenty of help. The American Diabetes Association advises patients that because of the disease's many intricacies, they'll need a team of health-care specialists to back them up. Cash has a village: Dr. Charles Gartland Dr. Gartland gave Cash a blood test to screen for diabetes as part of her annual exam last fall.
NEWS
June 30, 2010
A story Monday reported on a national study on preventing diabetes, which found significantly better average insulin levels among middle-school students who experienced a series of interventions compared with students in control schools. The story incorrectly reported that there were better fasting glucose levels. They were not significantly different between the groups. In some editions Tuesday, photo captions with a story on the hot weather incorrectly located the Crystal Lake Pool, which is in Haddon Township.
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