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Insulin

LIVING
September 25, 1995 | By Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The medical researchers are closing in day by day, like detectives on the trail of an elusive criminal. Five years ago, they followed their suspect into a microscopic world, to part of a single chromosome. Then, six months ago, while looking for more clues, they walked across the culprit's neighborhood, gene by gene. Now, the search is door to door, say researchers at the Coriell Institute for Medical Research in Camden, who are hunting for the gene or genes on Chromosome 6 that protect people from developing diabetes.
NEWS
September 18, 1991 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
EYE OF THE BEHOLDER Some of you - including a sizable fraction of those who have had elective plastic surgery - may be suffering from delusions of imagined ugliness. A report in The American Journal of Psychiatry says "body dismorphic disorder" is characterized by obsession with imagined flaws such as an overly large nose, "devious-looking" eyebrows, a "stretched" mouth or undersized genitals. Severe depression, suicidal behavior, social withdrawal, repeated visits to plastic surgeons and "frequent mirror checking" are common symptoms.
NEWS
June 30, 2010
A story Monday reported on a national study on preventing diabetes, which found significantly better average insulin levels among middle-school students who experienced a series of interventions compared with students in control schools. The story incorrectly reported that there were better fasting glucose levels. They were not significantly different between the groups. In some editions Tuesday, photo captions with a story on the hot weather incorrectly located the Crystal Lake Pool, which is in Haddon Township.
NEWS
March 27, 1997 | Daily News wire services
BOSTON Bone marrow transplants can also cause cancer Bone marrow transplants for curing cancer can themselves cause cancer many years later, a study found. The reason appears to be the high doses of radiation that are a crucial part of marrow transplants. Bone marrow transplants are widely used to treat leukemia and other blood cancers. Typically, doctors give high doses of chemotherapy and radiation to kill diseased bone marrow, then replace it with marrow from a donor.
NEWS
April 1, 2008 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When doctors told 28-year-old Nakia East that her 1-year-old's sudden weight loss and unusual thirst were caused by diabetes, she found herself thrust into a whole new level of parenting. "They told me everything was going to change," said East, who lives in Upper Darby. Since then, she has learned to inject her son, Yanaan, with insulin four times every day. She tracks every ounce of food he eats and measures his blood sugar after each meal. And then there are the terrifying moments when the readings plunge far too low. "They told me he's going to have this his whole life," she said recently, resigned to her son's fate.
NEWS
November 19, 2009 | By Karen Knee For the Inquirer
Quest for a new pancreas For people with Type 1 diabetes, managing blood sugar can be a full-time gig. Jeffrey Joseph, director of Jefferson Medical College's Artificial Pancreas Center, is trying to change that. An artificial pancreas, Joseph explained, would be like a pacemaker for blood sugar. The device would consist of a continuous blood-sugar monitor communicating with a "smart" insulin pump to give just the right dose of insulin. Instead of having to draw blood from four to 12 times a day - and still never knowing if their blood sugar is going up or down - diabetics could go about their day like the rest of us, without the fear of becoming hyper- or hypoglycemic.
NEWS
July 6, 1989 | By Steve Wartenberg, Special to The Inquirer
Chris Franklin knew there was something wrong with him. During summer football practice, he started feeling weak. He was eating more than ever but losing weight at an alarming rate. "There was a lot of mono going around school, and I thought that's what I had," said Franklin, who was 14 at the time. After an examination by his doctor, Franklin learned that he had juvenile diabetes. "That really took me by surprise," he said. "At first it was overwhelming, and I was a little scared.
NEWS
March 27, 1988 | By Dorothy G. Wegard, Special to The Inquirer
Peter Meyer thought he had the flu. It was his wife who suggested a blood test, and it was his doctor who suggested that Meyer head right over to Zurbrugg Memorial Hospitals, Riverside Division. There, Meyer was told that without treatment, he was 48 hours away from a coma and death. That was five months ago. Today, Meyer leads a normal life doing what he loves best - teaching scuba diving - because of the treatment he received at Zurbrugg. Meyer's "flu" turned out to be diabetes.
SPORTS
March 5, 2005 | By Rob Parent INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Like many teenagers, Brendan Hager doesn't have to be dragged out of bed to go to school. He sets his own routine when the morning bell tolls. "Wake up in the morning, see how my blood sugar is and then give myself the first shot," Hager said. It is the first of what commonly are four injections of insulin for Hager, a junior at Conestoga and a Type 1 diabetic who learned long ago to cope with his disease, and succeed despite it. Hager is the starting point guard for the Pioneers boys' basketball team, which opens play in the PIAA Class AAAA state tournament tomorrow against District 3's Red Lion at Carlisle High School.
NEWS
September 21, 1998 | By Shannon O'Boye, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The new Miss America posed for photographers late yesterday morning holding her dazzling crown in one hand and her insulin pump in the other. Nicole Johnson is one of the 16 million people with diabetes. She was diagnosed with the less common form called Type I, or juvenile, diabetes as a 19-year-old college sophomore after seeking medical treatment for what she thought were flu symptoms. The 24-year-old native of Seminole, Fla., said she had been wearing the pump for the last 14 months, and that it has helped her regain control of her life.
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