CollectionsInsulin
IN THE NEWS

Insulin

NEWS
April 1, 2008 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When doctors told 28-year-old Nakia East that her 1-year-old's sudden weight loss and unusual thirst were caused by diabetes, she found herself thrust into a whole new level of parenting. "They told me everything was going to change," said East, who lives in Upper Darby. Since then, she has learned to inject her son, Yanaan, with insulin four times every day. She tracks every ounce of food he eats and measures his blood sugar after each meal. And then there are the terrifying moments when the readings plunge far too low. "They told me he's going to have this his whole life," she said recently, resigned to her son's fate.
NEWS
November 19, 2009 | By Karen Knee For the Inquirer
Quest for a new pancreas For people with Type 1 diabetes, managing blood sugar can be a full-time gig. Jeffrey Joseph, director of Jefferson Medical College's Artificial Pancreas Center, is trying to change that. An artificial pancreas, Joseph explained, would be like a pacemaker for blood sugar. The device would consist of a continuous blood-sugar monitor communicating with a "smart" insulin pump to give just the right dose of insulin. Instead of having to draw blood from four to 12 times a day - and still never knowing if their blood sugar is going up or down - diabetics could go about their day like the rest of us, without the fear of becoming hyper- or hypoglycemic.
NEWS
July 6, 1989 | By Steve Wartenberg, Special to The Inquirer
Chris Franklin knew there was something wrong with him. During summer football practice, he started feeling weak. He was eating more than ever but losing weight at an alarming rate. "There was a lot of mono going around school, and I thought that's what I had," said Franklin, who was 14 at the time. After an examination by his doctor, Franklin learned that he had juvenile diabetes. "That really took me by surprise," he said. "At first it was overwhelming, and I was a little scared.
NEWS
March 27, 1988 | By Dorothy G. Wegard, Special to The Inquirer
Peter Meyer thought he had the flu. It was his wife who suggested a blood test, and it was his doctor who suggested that Meyer head right over to Zurbrugg Memorial Hospitals, Riverside Division. There, Meyer was told that without treatment, he was 48 hours away from a coma and death. That was five months ago. Today, Meyer leads a normal life doing what he loves best - teaching scuba diving - because of the treatment he received at Zurbrugg. Meyer's "flu" turned out to be diabetes.
SPORTS
March 5, 2005 | By Rob Parent INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Like many teenagers, Brendan Hager doesn't have to be dragged out of bed to go to school. He sets his own routine when the morning bell tolls. "Wake up in the morning, see how my blood sugar is and then give myself the first shot," Hager said. It is the first of what commonly are four injections of insulin for Hager, a junior at Conestoga and a Type 1 diabetic who learned long ago to cope with his disease, and succeed despite it. Hager is the starting point guard for the Pioneers boys' basketball team, which opens play in the PIAA Class AAAA state tournament tomorrow against District 3's Red Lion at Carlisle High School.
NEWS
September 21, 1998 | By Shannon O'Boye, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The new Miss America posed for photographers late yesterday morning holding her dazzling crown in one hand and her insulin pump in the other. Nicole Johnson is one of the 16 million people with diabetes. She was diagnosed with the less common form called Type I, or juvenile, diabetes as a 19-year-old college sophomore after seeking medical treatment for what she thought were flu symptoms. The 24-year-old native of Seminole, Fla., said she had been wearing the pump for the last 14 months, and that it has helped her regain control of her life.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2012 | By Art Carey, Inquirer Columnist
Peter Hopkins, the music director at St. Peter's Church, is an erudite, energetic man who plays the piano and organ, sings with a fine tenor voice, and can blend the disparate voices in the choir so that hymns fill the historic Episcopal church in Society Hill with a sound that's upliftingly supernal. Physically, he looks lean and fit, carrying 180 pounds on a 5-foot-11 frame. If you met him today, you'd never believe that he once weighed 300 pounds. But such were the wages of sin in his youth.
NEWS
August 7, 1997 | By Linda Wright Moore
For La'Shaira Cooke, summer is not about lazy afternoons, punctuated by play and Popsicles. Day camp and sports are not allowed. La'Shaira, 9, would like nothing better than to run wild and free in the August heat, anticipating a sweet custard cone to cool off at dusk. But because she suffers from "brittle" diabetes, such simple childhood pleasures are out of bounds. Sweet foods and too much activity can upset the delicate balance of insulin and sugar in her bloodstream, resulting in diabetic shock or other complications that land her in the hospital - or cost her her life.
SPORTS
October 12, 1999 | By Chris Morkides, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Annie Greenspun's first thought after learning she had diabetes in August 1998 wasn't about life or death, or even about the way her daily routine was about to change. Her first thought, as she sat in the Bryn Mawr Hospital emergency room, was about a soccer tournament. "About a week and a half later, I was supposed to go to Detroit for the Maccabi Games," Greenspun said. "That's what I was focused on. I really wanted to play. " She did. Having diabetes didn't stop the Haverford High junior then, and it hasn't stopped her now. "That's what got her out of the hospital," said her father, Eric.
NEWS
July 25, 2002 | By Nancy Phillips INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
His pleas for help were ignored, so Jose Santiago-Perez, a diabetic and a heroin addict, spent the last day of his life vomiting and writhing in a Philadelphia prison cell - becoming so thirsty that at one point, other inmates say, he drank from a toilet. His death, on Sept. 16, 2000, was the result of "a systemic failure" and was evidence of prison medical care "in chaos," District Attorney Lynne M. Abraham said yesterday. But she said no one would be criminally charged for the inaction that allowed Santiago-Perez, 28, to die. His death will cost the taxpayers, though.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|