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NEWS
November 24, 2005 | By Christine Schiavo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nurse Jean Saxon did not apologize to her dead husband's family, nor did she offer any explanations before being sentenced yesterday to life in prison for the insulin-induced murder of Jerry Saxon. "I wasn't expecting any apology because of who she is," said Michael Saxon of Levittown, Jerry's brother. "She still thinks she's innocent. " A jury convicted Jean Saxon, 46, of Levittown, of first-degree murder and other charges Monday in Bucks County Court. In announcing the mandatory life sentence with no chance of parole yesterday, Judge David W. Heckler added one month to seven years for theft and one to six months for possession of a controlled substance, making the sentences run consecutively.
NEWS
November 22, 2005 | By Christine Schiavo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The evidence against nurse Jean Saxon was circumstantial, but overwhelming. It took a Bucks County jury only an hour to convict her yesterday of first-degree murder in the insulin-induced death of her husband, Jerry, 52, in March 2003. The prosecution argued that Saxon's weapon was unusual, but her motive wasn't: She injected her nondiabetic husband with insulin, causing his blood sugar to drop to a remarkably low level. She did it to gain $152,000 in life-insurance benefits, her husband's pension, their new home, and the freedom to be with the married coworker with whom she was having an affair, said Michelle A. Henry, chief deputy district attorney.
NEWS
November 19, 2005 | By Christine Schiavo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nurse Jean Saxon told a Bucks County jury yesterday that the syringe found in the toilet of her rented home was used not to inject her husband with a fatal dose of insulin, as alleged by prosecutors, but to give a friend a vitamin shot. The prescribed painkillers and antidepressants that she instructed her daughter to hide from police were stolen not by her, but by her former boyfriend, Saxon testified. As for the search stringing the keywords "insulin, ingested and dangerous" found on Jean Saxon's Levittown computer the day before her estranged husband, Jerry, was discovered unconscious in his Bensalem apartment, Saxon said she didn't do it. She offered no explanation as to who had. Jerry Saxon, 52, died in April 2003, five weeks after his wife found him comatose.
NEWS
November 18, 2005 | By Christine Schiavo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nearly a year after Jean Saxon moved out of a rented Levittown home, her landlord discovered a syringe in the base of the toilet - a find the prosecution in Saxon's murder trial presented in Bucks County Court yesterday as the case's smoking gun. Edmund Armstrong said he found the syringe after taking the toilet apart to see why it repeatedly clogged. He called a Bensalem detective to retrieve it. Saxon, 46, is charged with the murder of her estranged husband, Jerry, 52, who lapsed into a coma on March 17, 2003, and died five weeks later.
NEWS
November 16, 2005 | By Christine Schiavo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Using her charms and a hypodermic needle, nurse Jean Saxon killed her estranged husband in 2003 so that she could collect insurance money and be with her lover, the prosecution argued yesterday in the opening of Saxon's murder trial in Bucks County Court. But if that were true, where was the needle mark on Jerry Saxon's skin?, defense attorney John Fioravanti asked. And where was the needle? "No one can say that an insulin injection caused Jerry Saxon's death," Fioravanti said.
NEWS
September 13, 2005 | By Chris Gray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lucille Hechler stood behind the padlocked rusty iron fence that shielded her dilapidated Lower Garden District home from the outside world, fiddling with a dirty change purse and glancing nervously at her siblings on the porch strewn with boxes and trash. "We've never been out no place, honey," she said. "Nowhere but here. " This is a typical inhabitant of New Orleans two weeks after Hurricane Katrina smashed through the city: members of the underclass so desperately poor or in some cases mentally ill that they had been clutching to the margins of this city long before the storm clouds even formed.
NEWS
March 25, 2005 | By Christine Schiavo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jean Saxon pleaded not guilty yesterday to murdering her estranged husband with insulin, laying the groundwork for what her lawyer called "a battle of the experts. " At a preliminary hearing in Penndel, Saxon, a licensed practical nurse, sat expressionless as a forensic pathologist testified that Jerry Saxon, 52, died from "a homicidal injection of insulin. " Ian Hood, who conducted an autopsy on Jerry Saxon, said he had never seen a blood-sugar level as low as Saxon's when Saxon was brought by ambulance to Frankford Hospital-Bucks Campus in Fairless Hills on March 17, 2003.
SPORTS
March 5, 2005 | By Rob Parent INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Like many teenagers, Brendan Hager doesn't have to be dragged out of bed to go to school. He sets his own routine when the morning bell tolls. "Wake up in the morning, see how my blood sugar is and then give myself the first shot," Hager said. It is the first of what commonly are four injections of insulin for Hager, a junior at Conestoga and a Type 1 diabetic who learned long ago to cope with his disease, and succeed despite it. Hager is the starting point guard for the Pioneers boys' basketball team, which opens play in the PIAA Class AAAA state tournament tomorrow against District 3's Red Lion at Carlisle High School.
NEWS
December 7, 2004 | By Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Bucks County nurse charged with murdering her husband with an insulin shot must remain jailed until her trial, a judge ruled yesterday. Jean Saxon is ineligible for bail because Pennsylvania law forbids it for defendants facing potential life sentences, Bucks County Court Judge Mitchell Goldberg said at a bail hearing. A grand jury indicted Saxon, 45, of Levittown, on a first-degree murder charge Nov. 18. She is accused of lethally injecting her estranged husband, Jerry, apparently as he slept in his Bensalem apartment on March 17, 2003.
NEWS
December 6, 2004 | By Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A promising treatment has some diabetics seeing a future without the burden of insulin injections. But the procedure - an infusion of insulin-making cells - does not help every patient and often stops working over time. That mixed success story emerged last week at a Philadelphia conference on the status of islet cell transplants, an experimental therapy that some scientists think could lead to a cure for diabetes. "We have made exponential progress over the past several years, but we still have a long, long way to go," said James Shapiro, who directs the islet transplant program at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada.
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