CollectionsInsulin
IN THE NEWS

Insulin

NEWS
November 19, 2004 | By Christine Schiavo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Bucks County nurse was charged yesterday with murdering her estranged husband by injecting him with insulin that she allegedly stole from her employer. Jean Saxon, 45, of Levittown, is being held without bail in Bucks County prison on charges of first-degree murder, theft, possession of a controlled substance, and tampering with evidence. According to a grand jury presentment, Saxon injected her non-diabetic husband, Jerry Saxon, 52, with insulin apparently as he slept in his Bensalem apartment on March 17, 2003.
NEWS
July 21, 2004 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What's good for your heart likely is good for your head, according to a growing number of studies on the risk factors for Alzheimer's disease. Four studies released yesterday in Philadelphia added more evidence that Alzheimer's and cardiovascular disease were related somehow. They found connections between memory function and high blood pressure, good cholesterol, diabetes and insulin levels. "This evidence has been accumulating in big studies . . . over the past two or three years," said Hugh C. Hendrie, codirector of the Center for Alzheimer's Disease and Related Neuropsychiatric Disorders at Indiana University.
NEWS
December 11, 2003 | By Marc Schogol INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A state police helicopter searched unsuccessfully yesterday for a Delaware County man with a history of diabetic disorientation who has been missing for a week. "There's nothing to report," said Ridley Police Lt. Charles Howley. "It's like he just vanished into thin air. " There are growing concerns that James Amabile, 38, of the Folsom section of Ridley Township, has run out of insulin, on which his life depends, and about exposure to the snow and subfreezing temperatures of recent days.
NEWS
October 3, 2003 | By Len Fusaro
As a pharmacist, I am surrounded every day by medicines to treat numerous medical conditions - everything from osteoporosis to hypertension to diabetes. But, until one day last year, diabetes, like many other diseases, was just an abstract part of a day's work. On that fateful spring day, my wife and I learned that our precious 3-year-old daughter, Kailyn, had Type 1, or juvenile, diabetes. That means her body does not produce insulin, which is necessary for the body to use sugar.
NEWS
August 8, 2002 | By Marian Uhlman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eating a meal when it is convenient. Indulging in sweets once considered off-limits. Waking up less often at night to go to the bathroom. Such are the little pleasures that make diabetes an ever more manageable disease. As the American Association of Diabetes Educators gathers in Philadelphia this week, the good news is that new treatments allow people with diabetes to live better. The bad news is that more Americans - more overweight than ever - are getting diabetes, and getting it earlier in life.
NEWS
July 25, 2002 | By Nancy Phillips INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
His pleas for help were ignored, so Jose Santiago-Perez, a diabetic and a heroin addict, spent the last day of his life vomiting and writhing in a Philadelphia prison cell - becoming so thirsty that at one point, other inmates say, he drank from a toilet. His death, on Sept. 16, 2000, was the result of "a systemic failure" and was evidence of prison medical care "in chaos," District Attorney Lynne M. Abraham said yesterday. But she said no one would be criminally charged for the inaction that allowed Santiago-Perez, 28, to die. His death will cost the taxpayers, though.
SPORTS
April 23, 2002 | By Ira Josephs INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Rather than complain, Kelly O'Connell took command. Instead of slowing down, O'Connell sped up. The Coatesville senior could have felt sorry for herself, but she decided to reach out to others. Juvenile diabetes has affected O'Connell since she was diagnosed almost 15 months ago. But the all-state runner has never been faster or more focused. Moreover, she's found a calling and a career choice. O'Connell, who has accepted a scholarship from the University of Pittsburgh, has decided to eventually earn a master's degree in nursing and become a diabetic nurse educator.
SPORTS
June 29, 2001 | By Joe Juliano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kelli Kuehne and Michelle McGann share a special sisterhood on the LPGA Tour, as two of the circuit's more high-profile players who are suffering from diabetes, but it's not something they dwell on. "We laugh and talk about the funny things about it," Kuehne said yesterday, taking a break from practicing in the sweltering heat for today's start of the ShopRite LPGA Classic. "But we'd rather talk about shopping, talk about something real . . . something a little more lighthearted, like movies, guys, whatever it is. " Of course, diabetes is a serious issue for Kuehne and McGann.
NEWS
June 22, 2001 | By Marian Uhlman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Until recently, patients with diabetes could get only insulin and one type of drug from their doctors. Today, a treatment revolution is under way, giving hope for longer, healthier lives to the 16 million Americans with the burgeoning disease. "The options that we have available to treat someone with diabetes are light-years more than 10 years ago," said Frank Vinicor, director of the diabetes division for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, who will attend the American Diabetes Association meeting opening today in Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
May 28, 2001 | By Peter Binzen FOR THE INQUIRER
Katherine D. Crothall fits comfortably into the world of high-technology entrepreneurship. With a Ph.D. in electrical engineering and seven years of experience with Hughes Aircraft Co., she founded a high-tech company in Southern California, and sold it profitably. She moved to Seattle and started a second such business, which was later sold profitably. Now she is running her third enterprise, Animas Corp., a fledgling firm in Chester County that makes insulin pumps for diabetics.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|