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Insulin

NEWS
November 16, 2005 | By Christine Schiavo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Using her charms and a hypodermic needle, nurse Jean Saxon killed her estranged husband in 2003 so that she could collect insurance money and be with her lover, the prosecution argued yesterday in the opening of Saxon's murder trial in Bucks County Court. But if that were true, where was the needle mark on Jerry Saxon's skin?, defense attorney John Fioravanti asked. And where was the needle? "No one can say that an insulin injection caused Jerry Saxon's death," Fioravanti said.
NEWS
September 13, 2005 | By Chris Gray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lucille Hechler stood behind the padlocked rusty iron fence that shielded her dilapidated Lower Garden District home from the outside world, fiddling with a dirty change purse and glancing nervously at her siblings on the porch strewn with boxes and trash. "We've never been out no place, honey," she said. "Nowhere but here. " This is a typical inhabitant of New Orleans two weeks after Hurricane Katrina smashed through the city: members of the underclass so desperately poor or in some cases mentally ill that they had been clutching to the margins of this city long before the storm clouds even formed.
NEWS
March 25, 2005 | By Christine Schiavo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jean Saxon pleaded not guilty yesterday to murdering her estranged husband with insulin, laying the groundwork for what her lawyer called "a battle of the experts. " At a preliminary hearing in Penndel, Saxon, a licensed practical nurse, sat expressionless as a forensic pathologist testified that Jerry Saxon, 52, died from "a homicidal injection of insulin. " Ian Hood, who conducted an autopsy on Jerry Saxon, said he had never seen a blood-sugar level as low as Saxon's when Saxon was brought by ambulance to Frankford Hospital-Bucks Campus in Fairless Hills on March 17, 2003.
SPORTS
March 5, 2005 | By Rob Parent INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Like many teenagers, Brendan Hager doesn't have to be dragged out of bed to go to school. He sets his own routine when the morning bell tolls. "Wake up in the morning, see how my blood sugar is and then give myself the first shot," Hager said. It is the first of what commonly are four injections of insulin for Hager, a junior at Conestoga and a Type 1 diabetic who learned long ago to cope with his disease, and succeed despite it. Hager is the starting point guard for the Pioneers boys' basketball team, which opens play in the PIAA Class AAAA state tournament tomorrow against District 3's Red Lion at Carlisle High School.
NEWS
December 7, 2004 | By Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Bucks County nurse charged with murdering her husband with an insulin shot must remain jailed until her trial, a judge ruled yesterday. Jean Saxon is ineligible for bail because Pennsylvania law forbids it for defendants facing potential life sentences, Bucks County Court Judge Mitchell Goldberg said at a bail hearing. A grand jury indicted Saxon, 45, of Levittown, on a first-degree murder charge Nov. 18. She is accused of lethally injecting her estranged husband, Jerry, apparently as he slept in his Bensalem apartment on March 17, 2003.
NEWS
December 6, 2004 | By Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A promising treatment has some diabetics seeing a future without the burden of insulin injections. But the procedure - an infusion of insulin-making cells - does not help every patient and often stops working over time. That mixed success story emerged last week at a Philadelphia conference on the status of islet cell transplants, an experimental therapy that some scientists think could lead to a cure for diabetes. "We have made exponential progress over the past several years, but we still have a long, long way to go," said James Shapiro, who directs the islet transplant program at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada.
NEWS
December 6, 2004 | By Christine Schiavo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There was much that Jerry Saxon didn't know about his wife, Jean, and many things he chose to ignore, according to friends and family members, court records and police. While Jerry Saxon, 52, was planning to build a house and a new life with Jean, she was planning to move in with another man, court documents allege. While he was looking forward to dinner with her the night before he was found unconscious, she was searching the Internet for a clever way to kill him, police say. While he lay in a coma, clinging to life, she was phoning his employer to see whether she could cash in on his remaining vacation days, according to a grand jury presentment.
NEWS
November 19, 2004 | By Christine Schiavo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Bucks County nurse was charged yesterday with murdering her estranged husband by injecting him with insulin that she allegedly stole from her employer. Jean Saxon, 45, of Levittown, is being held without bail in Bucks County prison on charges of first-degree murder, theft, possession of a controlled substance, and tampering with evidence. According to a grand jury presentment, Saxon injected her non-diabetic husband, Jerry Saxon, 52, with insulin apparently as he slept in his Bensalem apartment on March 17, 2003.
NEWS
July 21, 2004 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What's good for your heart likely is good for your head, according to a growing number of studies on the risk factors for Alzheimer's disease. Four studies released yesterday in Philadelphia added more evidence that Alzheimer's and cardiovascular disease were related somehow. They found connections between memory function and high blood pressure, good cholesterol, diabetes and insulin levels. "This evidence has been accumulating in big studies . . . over the past two or three years," said Hugh C. Hendrie, codirector of the Center for Alzheimer's Disease and Related Neuropsychiatric Disorders at Indiana University.
NEWS
December 11, 2003 | By Marc Schogol INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A state police helicopter searched unsuccessfully yesterday for a Delaware County man with a history of diabetic disorientation who has been missing for a week. "There's nothing to report," said Ridley Police Lt. Charles Howley. "It's like he just vanished into thin air. " There are growing concerns that James Amabile, 38, of the Folsom section of Ridley Township, has run out of insulin, on which his life depends, and about exposure to the snow and subfreezing temperatures of recent days.
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