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NEWS
June 22, 1987 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Services were to be held this morning for Marie Franchetti, vice president of an insurance brokerage firm and a nationally recognized specialist in aviation insurance, who died Friday. She was 44 and lived in South Philadelphia. Franchetti had worked for Rollins Burdick Hunter, an insurance brokerage service with offices in the Ledger Building, since 1984. Previously, she had worked for Corroon and Black, an insurance agency. "Marie was an aviation insurance specialist," said Gil White, a vice president of Rollins Burdick Hunter and a close friend.
SPORTS
March 29, 1997 | by Sam Donnellon, Daily News Sports Writer
Back in town from two-day owners summit in West Palm Beach, Phillies president and general partner Bill Giles sounded less optimistic about signing Curt Schilling in time for the pitcher's Monday midnight deadline. The problem? "I'm not sure we can get the right insurance," he said, watching the Phillies win their 17th spring training game last night against Toronto at Jack Russell Stadium. Giles would like 100 percent insurance on Schilling's right arm. American Specialty, the insurance company he is dealing with, might be unwilling to do that.
NEWS
September 11, 2009 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For all President Obama's tough talk about insurance companies Wednesday night, health-economics experts said his overhaul plan held little obvious pain for insurers. Requiring everyone to buy coverage - with government subsidies when necessary - would bring in millions of new customers, lower selling costs, and reduce the hidden tax that all privately insured people pay for those without insurance, experts said. Insurance companies would have to give up some of their most egregious practices - refusing to sell insurance to the people most likely to need it, for example, or dropping customers who get sick - but they would all be in the same boat.
NEWS
July 28, 1988 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
The New Jersey Attorney General's Office has launched a review of Camden County's practices for awarding its insurance business, according to Deputy Attorney General Daniel P. Reynolds. In a letter to Freeholder Michael J. DiPiero, Reynolds said that his office was examining whether the county complied with the state public contracts law when it awarded its no-bid insurance business, worth more than $3.7 million since the start of 1987. DiPiero, a Republican, asked the state Department of Community Affairs last month to examine the county's procedure for giving that insurance business to Democratic Party leaders, including the party treasurer, John Gallagher, and the treasurer of the current freeholder campaign, Peter DiGiambattista.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1998 | By Josh Goldstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER The Associated Press contributed to this story
In the weeks before the Allegheny health system filed for bankruptcy in July, it quadrupled the value - from $50 million to $200 million - of liability insurance policies covering its board of directors and officers. Allegheny's creditors staked claim to that money yesterday - just in case coverage lapses at year's end today. They informed the health system's directors and officers of their intention to pursue the insurance money. The committee representing Allegheny's 65,000 unsecured creditors wrote to board members and executives viewed as most responsible for Allegheny's financial collapse.
NEWS
June 28, 1994
Goll-lee! Isn't that health-care debate somethin'? First, the president's plan includes at its very center a requirement that employers pay the cost of health insurance. In a way, this is a conservative position, since most Americans get their health care through their employers. It even makes accounting sense, because there is nowhere that the cost of health insurance isn't a factor in what's eventually in your paycheck. However, much to everyone's surprise, the Republicans went bats over it. Republicans these days go bats over virtually anything that might destroy Bill Clinton's chance to accomplish anything.
NEWS
February 18, 1993 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The township will begin picking up the tab for its commissioners' health, medical and accident insurance. The Board of Commissioners approved an ordinance Monday night authorizing the commissioners to receive the insurance. Recently adopted state legislation enables township commissioners to receive health coverage similar to that given to township employees, said Robert Breslin, acting solicitor. The commissioners also approved two other ordinances: One restricts parking on Second Street at Erickson Avenue and the second makes Fourth Street one-way in a westerly direction between Printz and Wanamaker Avenues between 6 and 9 a.m. Monday through Friday.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1986 | By Barbara Demick, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you can insure yourself, your spouse, your home and your automobile, why not another prized possession: your VCR? Such is the sales pitch many consumers hear when they go out to buy a new appliance. In the Philadelphia area, stores are offering policies resembling insurance for a ever-expanding assortment of products: stereos, videocassette recorders, lawn mowers, washers, computers, bicycles, refrigerators and even tires. Basically, if it can break, someone will try to sell you a policy to get it fixed.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Rachel Zamzow, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tony Burke was an energetic 2-year-old who loved drawing purple pictures of Barney and jumping on trampolines. But then his parents began to notice how he would grunt instead of talk, and couldn't look anyone in the eye. Before his third birthday, in 2005, he was diagnosed with autism. "It felt like my heart had been ripped out," said his mother, Suzanne Burke of Philadelphia. Seeking the best care, his parents found applied behavior analysis (ABA), a one-on-one therapy considered the most effective treatment to date for autism.
BUSINESS
June 25, 1990 | By Janet L. Fix, Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer wire services contributed to this article
Envision going to your bank to cash a check and being offered a life insurance policy, or even auto insurance. Futuristic? Well, the future may be nearer than you think. Consumers can't now buy life, health, auto or homeowners insurance through their banks, but a law enacted last month in Delaware allows state-chartered banks there to underwrite and sell insurance nationwide for the first time. Leading the push by banks to get into insurance are Citibank and Chase Manhattan, two of the nation's largest banks, both of which have subsidiaries in Delaware that could be used to sell insurance nationwide.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 19, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Researchers who study hereditary breast and ovarian cancer call it "the Angelina Jolie Effect. " They reported a sustained global surge in requests for BRCA genetic testing after the actress wrote about her preventive mastectomy two years ago. Last month, she gave another boost to awareness when she wrote about her recent surgery to remove her ovaries. But raising awareness hasn't necessarily lowered barriers, BRCA experts say. People seeking to identify and manage their inherited cancer risk often confront conflicting, confusing medical guidelines, test options, and insurance coverage.
NEWS
April 12, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
With just three days left to file 2014 taxes, tax preparer Mary Arthur and her colleagues at the Campaign for Working Families at 31 sites across Philadelphia and South Jersey are hard at work. But even as the tax season winds down, Arthur, the group's executive director, already is fretting about next year. She is worried because statistics from early March show that of the 10,000 tax returns filed, 2,800 were from people who didn't have health insurance last year and were paying a penalty.
NEWS
April 11, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a fire destroyed Grace Wang-Shing's home five years ago, she called insurance adjuster Marshall Perlman. As she waited for her settlement to arrive, the Philadelphia widow was evicted from two apartments. She sold her daughter's education bond and used her own retirement savings to begin rebuilding her house, which is still not complete. But she never received her $194,000 insurance settlement. And it is unlikely that she ever will, a prosecutor said Thursday as Perlman, also of Philadelphia, was sentenced to three to 21 years in state prison and ordered to make restitution for stealing insurance payments from Wang-Shing and 31 others.
NEWS
April 7, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
They said she unleashed profane rants on longtime friends. Persuaded an artist to fabricate a six-figure invoice. And made sure a "rat bastard" insurance adjuster she suspected had talked to state investigators knew that "snitches get stitches. " For years, Claire Risoldi has been known in Bucks County political circles as a gracious host of lavish fund-raisers for local Republicans. But in a Doylestown courtroom last week, witnesses sketched a portrait of the 67-year-old that sharply contrasted with the image she cultivated while mingling with the county elite.
NEWS
April 1, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The body-shop owner allegedly drove cars into poles and damaged them with forklifts - right across the street from the Darby Borough police station - in a scam to collect inflated claims from insurance companies. On Monday, Delaware County District Attorney Jack Whelan announced charges in a four-year investigation into the elaborate scheme that cost companies at least $85,000 and involved 11 individuals. Whelan said he expected to uncover further instances in the fraud scheme, adding, "We'd be naive to think this is the only amount of activity.
NEWS
March 31, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Morris "Mickey" Lloyd Jr., 77, of Philadelphia, an insurance executive who was active in alumni affairs for various educational institutions, died of a heart attack Monday, March 16, in Vero Beach, Fla. His family said Mr. Lloyd collapsed as he was about to tee off for a round of golf with his wife and daughter. The family maintains a condominium in Florida. Born in Philadelphia, he attended Chestnut Hill Academy but graduated from St. Paul's School in Concord, N.H., in 1956.
NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
What can you expect, when your surrogate is expecting? Prospective parents may be willing to pay any price. But first, examine the sensitive financial questions behind hiring a legal, legitimate surrogate (by legal, we mean not a woman you found online). What does the process cost? Who gets paid? Can you take out a home equity loan or charge credit cards? (Yes to both). The costs of surrogacy are usually about $120,000, experts advise. But like any lifetime investment, such as college or retirement, you can pay in stages.
NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Until she noticed the tiny blood spots on her sheets, Peg Fagan thought the itchy, raised area on her shoulder was a spider bite. So when her doctor asked during a routine checkup in April whether Fagan had any health concerns, she mentioned the bite. The doctor took a sample to biopsy. A few days later, Fagan got a call saying she had to come in to the office. "I said, 'No, I don't,' " remembered Fagan, 56, a breast cancer survivor. "If you are going to tell me that I have cancer, just tell me. " Fagan had melanoma, the most serious kind of skin cancer.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philip Rinaldi, the city's refinery titan, offered Philadelphia City Council a lesson in business terminology Friday when he introduced a new phrase into council's vocabulary: "idiot insurance. " During testimony on whether the city-owned Philadelphia Gas Works should engage in a public-private partnership, Rinaldi suggested Council could consider protecting its interests by maintaining an ownership stake in any private venture. "I live in a world of mergers and acquisitions," said Rinaldi, chief executive of Philadelphia Energy Solutions.
NEWS
March 14, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Raymond L. Freudberg, 92, formerly of Wyncote, a retired insurance company executive, died Wednesday, March 4, of heart failure at Beaumont at Bryn Mawr, where he had lived for 41/2 years. Born in Philadelphia to Herman and Rose Kierson Freudberg, Mr. Freudberg graduated from Olney High School in 1939 and took night courses at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1942. From 1942 to 1946 he served in Washington, in the finance division of the Air Transport Command, part of the Army Air Forces.
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