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NEWS
April 15, 2011 | By JASON NARK, narkj@phillynews.com 215-854-5916
THIS is the legend of the Algar Ferrari F50. It begins with an airline pilot with such a taste for speed that he conned his way into driving the $729,000 roadster, then stole it, leaving a stunned Main Line car salesman behind. The legend ends years later, after the government recovered the car and an FBI agent ran it into a tree in Kentucky. Now the wrecked 1996 Ferrari is collecting dust somewhere, object of a legal brawl between the U.S. government and the insurance company that owns the car. In a federal lawsuit filed earlier this year, Motors Insurance Corp.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philip Rinaldi, the city's refinery titan, offered Philadelphia City Council a lesson in business terminology Friday when he introduced a new phrase into council's vocabulary: "idiot insurance. " During testimony on whether the city-owned Philadelphia Gas Works should engage in a public-private partnership, Rinaldi suggested Council could consider protecting its interests by maintaining an ownership stake in any private venture. "I live in a world of mergers and acquisitions," said Rinaldi, chief executive of Philadelphia Energy Solutions.
NEWS
June 22, 1987 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Services were to be held this morning for Marie Franchetti, vice president of an insurance brokerage firm and a nationally recognized specialist in aviation insurance, who died Friday. She was 44 and lived in South Philadelphia. Franchetti had worked for Rollins Burdick Hunter, an insurance brokerage service with offices in the Ledger Building, since 1984. Previously, she had worked for Corroon and Black, an insurance agency. "Marie was an aviation insurance specialist," said Gil White, a vice president of Rollins Burdick Hunter and a close friend.
SPORTS
March 29, 1997 | by Sam Donnellon, Daily News Sports Writer
Back in town from two-day owners summit in West Palm Beach, Phillies president and general partner Bill Giles sounded less optimistic about signing Curt Schilling in time for the pitcher's Monday midnight deadline. The problem? "I'm not sure we can get the right insurance," he said, watching the Phillies win their 17th spring training game last night against Toronto at Jack Russell Stadium. Giles would like 100 percent insurance on Schilling's right arm. American Specialty, the insurance company he is dealing with, might be unwilling to do that.
NEWS
September 11, 2009 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For all President Obama's tough talk about insurance companies Wednesday night, health-economics experts said his overhaul plan held little obvious pain for insurers. Requiring everyone to buy coverage - with government subsidies when necessary - would bring in millions of new customers, lower selling costs, and reduce the hidden tax that all privately insured people pay for those without insurance, experts said. Insurance companies would have to give up some of their most egregious practices - refusing to sell insurance to the people most likely to need it, for example, or dropping customers who get sick - but they would all be in the same boat.
NEWS
July 28, 1988 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
The New Jersey Attorney General's Office has launched a review of Camden County's practices for awarding its insurance business, according to Deputy Attorney General Daniel P. Reynolds. In a letter to Freeholder Michael J. DiPiero, Reynolds said that his office was examining whether the county complied with the state public contracts law when it awarded its no-bid insurance business, worth more than $3.7 million since the start of 1987. DiPiero, a Republican, asked the state Department of Community Affairs last month to examine the county's procedure for giving that insurance business to Democratic Party leaders, including the party treasurer, John Gallagher, and the treasurer of the current freeholder campaign, Peter DiGiambattista.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1998 | By Josh Goldstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER The Associated Press contributed to this story
In the weeks before the Allegheny health system filed for bankruptcy in July, it quadrupled the value - from $50 million to $200 million - of liability insurance policies covering its board of directors and officers. Allegheny's creditors staked claim to that money yesterday - just in case coverage lapses at year's end today. They informed the health system's directors and officers of their intention to pursue the insurance money. The committee representing Allegheny's 65,000 unsecured creditors wrote to board members and executives viewed as most responsible for Allegheny's financial collapse.
NEWS
June 28, 1994
Goll-lee! Isn't that health-care debate somethin'? First, the president's plan includes at its very center a requirement that employers pay the cost of health insurance. In a way, this is a conservative position, since most Americans get their health care through their employers. It even makes accounting sense, because there is nowhere that the cost of health insurance isn't a factor in what's eventually in your paycheck. However, much to everyone's surprise, the Republicans went bats over it. Republicans these days go bats over virtually anything that might destroy Bill Clinton's chance to accomplish anything.
NEWS
February 18, 1993 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The township will begin picking up the tab for its commissioners' health, medical and accident insurance. The Board of Commissioners approved an ordinance Monday night authorizing the commissioners to receive the insurance. Recently adopted state legislation enables township commissioners to receive health coverage similar to that given to township employees, said Robert Breslin, acting solicitor. The commissioners also approved two other ordinances: One restricts parking on Second Street at Erickson Avenue and the second makes Fourth Street one-way in a westerly direction between Printz and Wanamaker Avenues between 6 and 9 a.m. Monday through Friday.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Rachel Zamzow, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tony Burke was an energetic 2-year-old who loved drawing purple pictures of Barney and jumping on trampolines. But then his parents began to notice how he would grunt instead of talk, and couldn't look anyone in the eye. Before his third birthday, in 2005, he was diagnosed with autism. "It felt like my heart had been ripped out," said his mother, Suzanne Burke of Philadelphia. Seeking the best care, his parents found applied behavior analysis (ABA), a one-on-one therapy considered the most effective treatment to date for autism.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
March 15, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philip Rinaldi, the city's refinery titan, offered Philadelphia City Council a lesson in business terminology Friday when he introduced a new phrase into council's vocabulary: "idiot insurance. " During testimony on whether the city-owned Philadelphia Gas Works should engage in a public-private partnership, Rinaldi suggested Council could consider protecting its interests by maintaining an ownership stake in any private venture. "I live in a world of mergers and acquisitions," said Rinaldi, chief executive of Philadelphia Energy Solutions.
NEWS
March 14, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Raymond L. Freudberg, 92, formerly of Wyncote, a retired insurance company executive, died Wednesday, March 4, of heart failure at Beaumont at Bryn Mawr, where he had lived for 41/2 years. Born in Philadelphia to Herman and Rose Kierson Freudberg, Mr. Freudberg graduated from Olney High School in 1939 and took night courses at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1942. From 1942 to 1946 he served in Washington, in the finance division of the Air Transport Command, part of the Army Air Forces.
NEWS
March 8, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Ted Dallas knew he was walking into a crisis the late-January day he accepted the job as Pennsylvania's acting secretary of the Department of Human Services. He knew that, since early December, thousands of Pennsylvanians with alcohol and drug addictions had been locked out of treatment centers. And he understood the seriousness of their situation. "For folks in the drug and alcohol world, that continuity of care and the wraparound services and keeping it consistent is particularly important," Dallas said.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lots of companies mount ambitious programs to hire college graduates, but the Graham Co., an insurance and risk-management company, takes a different approach. "As a rule, we don't hire right out of college," said Kenneth L. Ewell, 57, Graham's president and chief operating officer. Question: Why did Graham adopt that philosophy? Answer: You just have a higher degree of success [if] they've worked someplace else, and they have a little bit of context and they have some basis to judge Graham against.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2015 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Maybe you've learned this the hard way. You get into a small accident and make an insurance claim - say, one that nets you a couple of thousand dollars after your deductible. The next thing you know, your premium jumps. In the long run, you realize, you may actually come out behind. It's a frustrating moment for many, as illustrated by a recent Liberty Mutual commercial touting "accident forgiveness" and portraying a dutiful customer "like the poster child for paying on time," as the spokes-character puts it. "And then one day you tap the bumper of a station wagon.
NEWS
February 15, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
You wouldn't buy a car without negotiating, would you? Health care is the same now. Feb. 15 is the last day to sign up for a health-insurance policy and avoid a tax penalty to Uncle Sam that could total 2 percent of your income. If you don't have coverage, today's the day. If you have insurance, there are ways to save money on your medical bills. Because, let's face it, even the new insurance isn't that affordable. Silver and bronze plans under the Affordable Care Act carry median family deductibles of roughly $2,500 and $5,100, respectively, according to data from management-consulting firm McKinsey & Co. As health-care costs shift to consumers, we need to negotiate services at fair prices.
NEWS
February 5, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gary Bromberg, 83, of Springfield, Montgomery County, a commercial insurance broker and an artist, died Saturday, Jan. 31, of multiple myeloma at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., Mr. Bromberg moved to the Wynnefield section of Philadelphia with his family when he was 5. He graduated from Overbrook High School and from Pennsylvania State University with the Class of 1953. While there, he pledged Beta Sigma Pi fraternity. Mr. Bromberg did further study at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School.
NEWS
January 27, 2015
LAST WEEK'S Commonwealth Court ruling that overturned the school district's attempt to make teachers contribute to their health insurance was called a "very big victory" by teachers union president Jerry Jordan. It certainly is a victory for the union. The state appeals court, in a unanimous opinion, rejected the district's claim that the state-takeover law gave it the right to impose terms on the union. The ruling will save union members $54 million a year in payments they would otherwise have to make toward paying for their health insurance.
NEWS
January 22, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN JOSEPH Sindoni bought a boat for seagoing outings from the Jersey Shore, he thought his wife would be thrilled. But when she saw it, Margaret's reaction was less than enthusiastic. "Where's the bathroom?" she wanted to know. So, Joseph, always the devoted husband, went out and bought a bigger boat - a 24-footer with a bathroom. The family kept the boat for about eight years at North Wildwood, but, even though he was a former Navy man, the family didn't get that much use out of the boat and he finally sold it. Part of the problem was that Joseph Sindoni was the kind of guy whose favorite activity was work.
NEWS
January 17, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Raleigh M. Woods, 92, of Northwest Philadelphia, who had careers in life insurance, welding, and refrigeration repair, died Monday, Jan. 5, of kidney failure at the Visiting Nurse Association Hospice. Known as "Woody," Mr. Woods was the third of eight children. He was born in Covington, Va., and reared in Ashland, Ky., during the Great Depression by the Frank F. Fleming family. Later, he graduated from Booker T. Washington High School in Ashland. Mr. Woods served in World War II with the Army in Normandy, the Ardennes, the Rhineland, Northern France, and central Europe.
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