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NEWS
April 20, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Lou Franzini was about to give up. For two months, he had been trying to get re-enrolled in the health plan he chose on the Affordable Care Act's marketplace. The former banker, 63, had been paying for the plan since December, but then it was arbitrarily canceled. And his calls to the marketplace always elicited a similar response: Nope, can't be done. Even the support of U.S. Rep. Jim Gerlach, (R., Pa.) and Independence Blue Cross couldn't sway the decision. "I'd call the marketplace and the rep would say, 'No, we have to talk to Independence,' " Franzini, of Exton, said.
NEWS
June 22, 1987 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Services were to be held this morning for Marie Franchetti, vice president of an insurance brokerage firm and a nationally recognized specialist in aviation insurance, who died Friday. She was 44 and lived in South Philadelphia. Franchetti had worked for Rollins Burdick Hunter, an insurance brokerage service with offices in the Ledger Building, since 1984. Previously, she had worked for Corroon and Black, an insurance agency. "Marie was an aviation insurance specialist," said Gil White, a vice president of Rollins Burdick Hunter and a close friend.
SPORTS
March 29, 1997 | by Sam Donnellon, Daily News Sports Writer
Back in town from two-day owners summit in West Palm Beach, Phillies president and general partner Bill Giles sounded less optimistic about signing Curt Schilling in time for the pitcher's Monday midnight deadline. The problem? "I'm not sure we can get the right insurance," he said, watching the Phillies win their 17th spring training game last night against Toronto at Jack Russell Stadium. Giles would like 100 percent insurance on Schilling's right arm. American Specialty, the insurance company he is dealing with, might be unwilling to do that.
NEWS
September 11, 2009 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For all President Obama's tough talk about insurance companies Wednesday night, health-economics experts said his overhaul plan held little obvious pain for insurers. Requiring everyone to buy coverage - with government subsidies when necessary - would bring in millions of new customers, lower selling costs, and reduce the hidden tax that all privately insured people pay for those without insurance, experts said. Insurance companies would have to give up some of their most egregious practices - refusing to sell insurance to the people most likely to need it, for example, or dropping customers who get sick - but they would all be in the same boat.
NEWS
July 28, 1988 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
The New Jersey Attorney General's Office has launched a review of Camden County's practices for awarding its insurance business, according to Deputy Attorney General Daniel P. Reynolds. In a letter to Freeholder Michael J. DiPiero, Reynolds said that his office was examining whether the county complied with the state public contracts law when it awarded its no-bid insurance business, worth more than $3.7 million since the start of 1987. DiPiero, a Republican, asked the state Department of Community Affairs last month to examine the county's procedure for giving that insurance business to Democratic Party leaders, including the party treasurer, John Gallagher, and the treasurer of the current freeholder campaign, Peter DiGiambattista.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1998 | By Josh Goldstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER The Associated Press contributed to this story
In the weeks before the Allegheny health system filed for bankruptcy in July, it quadrupled the value - from $50 million to $200 million - of liability insurance policies covering its board of directors and officers. Allegheny's creditors staked claim to that money yesterday - just in case coverage lapses at year's end today. They informed the health system's directors and officers of their intention to pursue the insurance money. The committee representing Allegheny's 65,000 unsecured creditors wrote to board members and executives viewed as most responsible for Allegheny's financial collapse.
NEWS
June 28, 1994
Goll-lee! Isn't that health-care debate somethin'? First, the president's plan includes at its very center a requirement that employers pay the cost of health insurance. In a way, this is a conservative position, since most Americans get their health care through their employers. It even makes accounting sense, because there is nowhere that the cost of health insurance isn't a factor in what's eventually in your paycheck. However, much to everyone's surprise, the Republicans went bats over it. Republicans these days go bats over virtually anything that might destroy Bill Clinton's chance to accomplish anything.
NEWS
February 18, 1993 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The township will begin picking up the tab for its commissioners' health, medical and accident insurance. The Board of Commissioners approved an ordinance Monday night authorizing the commissioners to receive the insurance. Recently adopted state legislation enables township commissioners to receive health coverage similar to that given to township employees, said Robert Breslin, acting solicitor. The commissioners also approved two other ordinances: One restricts parking on Second Street at Erickson Avenue and the second makes Fourth Street one-way in a westerly direction between Printz and Wanamaker Avenues between 6 and 9 a.m. Monday through Friday.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1986 | By Barbara Demick, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you can insure yourself, your spouse, your home and your automobile, why not another prized possession: your VCR? Such is the sales pitch many consumers hear when they go out to buy a new appliance. In the Philadelphia area, stores are offering policies resembling insurance for a ever-expanding assortment of products: stereos, videocassette recorders, lawn mowers, washers, computers, bicycles, refrigerators and even tires. Basically, if it can break, someone will try to sell you a policy to get it fixed.
BUSINESS
June 25, 1990 | By Janet L. Fix, Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer wire services contributed to this article
Envision going to your bank to cash a check and being offered a life insurance policy, or even auto insurance. Futuristic? Well, the future may be nearer than you think. Consumers can't now buy life, health, auto or homeowners insurance through their banks, but a law enacted last month in Delaware allows state-chartered banks there to underwrite and sell insurance nationwide for the first time. Leading the push by banks to get into insurance are Citibank and Chase Manhattan, two of the nation's largest banks, both of which have subsidiaries in Delaware that could be used to sell insurance nationwide.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 22, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sue Schick, 52, president of UnitedHealthcare Pennsylvania and Delaware, claims she was mortified last month when, in the process of honoring her with the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce's Paradigm Award, the master of ceremonies read entries from her seventh-grade yearbook. She shouldn't have been. The yearbook showed early evidence of the leadership abilities that prompted the chamber to name her 2014's top female business executive. "In the Girl Scout cookie sales, we didn't think we could surpass the previous year," Schick recalled.
NEWS
April 20, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Lou Franzini was about to give up. For two months, he had been trying to get re-enrolled in the health plan he chose on the Affordable Care Act's marketplace. The former banker, 63, had been paying for the plan since December, but then it was arbitrarily canceled. And his calls to the marketplace always elicited a similar response: Nope, can't be done. Even the support of U.S. Rep. Jim Gerlach, (R., Pa.) and Independence Blue Cross couldn't sway the decision. "I'd call the marketplace and the rep would say, 'No, we have to talk to Independence,' " Franzini, of Exton, said.
NEWS
April 13, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nearly 800 public comments - overwhelmingly negative - about Gov. Corbett's alternative Medicaid expansion proposal were submitted online by Friday's deadline, far more than for other states that offered less complicated plans. With the federal comment period over, the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services technically could act at any time. But public-policy experts say that the complexity of this plan - the only one in the nation to link an expansion of coverage for a new population to changes in insurance, including benefit cuts, for some current Medicaid recipients - will likely lengthen negotiations that typically take months.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Crozer-Keystone Health System and Cigna-HealthSpring are in a dispute over a Medicare Advantage contract that expires April 30. It's not unusual for negotiations between hospitals and health insurers to go down to the wire, but in this case, Crozer, Delaware County's biggest health system, insists HealthSpring, a unit of Cigna, has ended the Crozer contract. "Cigna-HealthSpring terminated our participation when we did not agree to their demand that we accept rates below Medicare rates and significantly below our cost to provide care to their members," Crozer said.
NEWS
April 6, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
There were plenty of nights during the last 33 years that Denise Schroeder of West Chester had to choose between eating dinner and paying for health insurance. And no, that is not an exaggeration. Schroeder is a cancer survivor, and for many of those years, a working, single mom who felt lucky just to have coverage. Schroeder, who owns Happy Heart Clown 'N Stuff, a party entertainment firm, always fed her daughter but skipped meals herself when money was tight to ensure she could pay the $700 monthly premium.
NEWS
March 17, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Drew Ferrara and Connie Kaminski expected flood-insurance premiums to rise in parts of Yardley, a Bucks County river town swamped by three major floods between September 2004 and June 2006. But not by 800 percent. When the insurance bill arrived in December for their two-story real estate office near the Delaware River, they saw premiums jump from about $3,000 a year to nearly $27,000. "The absurdity of it was shocking," Ferrara said. "Who can afford to pay this type of insurance?"
NEWS
March 10, 2014 | Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
It's a job where stress mounts like dollars on a taxicab meter. The hours are long, the wages are low, and the competition for customers is often fierce. Toss in an eat-on-the-go, fast-food diet, little exercise, a sore back and achy joints from jockeying through traffic all day and you start to grasp the health burdens Philadelphia cabdrivers face. "It's a high-stress job," said Ronald Blount, president of the Unified Taxi Workers Alliance of Pennsylvania, which represents 1,200 of the city's 5,000 cabdrivers.
NEWS
March 3, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
The Affordable Care Act is changing more than the way Americans buy health insurance. It's making it simpler for unhappily married couples to uncouple. Word is starting to spread among family law attorneys that in the post-ACA era, health insurance isn't the binder it once was for holding bad marriages together. With more options available on the market and preexisting conditions no longer an issue, people once reluctant to divorce for fear of losing health insurance coverage would do well to reconsider.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Crozer-Keystone Health System, the biggest health-care provider in Delaware County, said Thursday that it was cutting 250 positions, after losing $15.7 million since July 1. "Changes in health care continue to have a negative effect on Crozer-Keystone and many other health-care providers in our region and throughout the country," Crozer said in a statement. The layoffs at Crozer, which employed 6,800, will include doctors and a "significant number of managers," the statement said.
NEWS
February 24, 2014 | Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Certified application counselor Eric N. Goren has spent the last five months helping people negotiate the often-perplexing path to buying health insurance on the Affordable Care marketplace. And primary care doctor Eric N. Goren is beginning to see the results of his efforts at a clinic in West Philadelphia. "I've started to see a small number of folks who are now insured," said Goren, an assistant professor at the University of Pennsylvania. One thing the ACA hasn't changed is the lag time between calling for and scheduling an appointment.
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