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NEWS
June 22, 1987 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Services were to be held this morning for Marie Franchetti, vice president of an insurance brokerage firm and a nationally recognized specialist in aviation insurance, who died Friday. She was 44 and lived in South Philadelphia. Franchetti had worked for Rollins Burdick Hunter, an insurance brokerage service with offices in the Ledger Building, since 1984. Previously, she had worked for Corroon and Black, an insurance agency. "Marie was an aviation insurance specialist," said Gil White, a vice president of Rollins Burdick Hunter and a close friend.
BUSINESS
December 20, 2015
Where: Bala Cynwyd. Parent: Tokio Marine Group, Japan. Business: Sells insurance in many niches - bowling alleys, cyber security, yoga studios, pest control, zoos, professional liability. What's new: Now covers craft breweries. 2015 revenue: $2.9 billion. Employees: 2,000; 600 here.
SPORTS
March 29, 1997 | by Sam Donnellon, Daily News Sports Writer
Back in town from two-day owners summit in West Palm Beach, Phillies president and general partner Bill Giles sounded less optimistic about signing Curt Schilling in time for the pitcher's Monday midnight deadline. The problem? "I'm not sure we can get the right insurance," he said, watching the Phillies win their 17th spring training game last night against Toronto at Jack Russell Stadium. Giles would like 100 percent insurance on Schilling's right arm. American Specialty, the insurance company he is dealing with, might be unwilling to do that.
NEWS
September 11, 2009 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For all President Obama's tough talk about insurance companies Wednesday night, health-economics experts said his overhaul plan held little obvious pain for insurers. Requiring everyone to buy coverage - with government subsidies when necessary - would bring in millions of new customers, lower selling costs, and reduce the hidden tax that all privately insured people pay for those without insurance, experts said. Insurance companies would have to give up some of their most egregious practices - refusing to sell insurance to the people most likely to need it, for example, or dropping customers who get sick - but they would all be in the same boat.
NEWS
July 28, 1988 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
The New Jersey Attorney General's Office has launched a review of Camden County's practices for awarding its insurance business, according to Deputy Attorney General Daniel P. Reynolds. In a letter to Freeholder Michael J. DiPiero, Reynolds said that his office was examining whether the county complied with the state public contracts law when it awarded its no-bid insurance business, worth more than $3.7 million since the start of 1987. DiPiero, a Republican, asked the state Department of Community Affairs last month to examine the county's procedure for giving that insurance business to Democratic Party leaders, including the party treasurer, John Gallagher, and the treasurer of the current freeholder campaign, Peter DiGiambattista.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1998 | By Josh Goldstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER The Associated Press contributed to this story
In the weeks before the Allegheny health system filed for bankruptcy in July, it quadrupled the value - from $50 million to $200 million - of liability insurance policies covering its board of directors and officers. Allegheny's creditors staked claim to that money yesterday - just in case coverage lapses at year's end today. They informed the health system's directors and officers of their intention to pursue the insurance money. The committee representing Allegheny's 65,000 unsecured creditors wrote to board members and executives viewed as most responsible for Allegheny's financial collapse.
NEWS
June 28, 1994
Goll-lee! Isn't that health-care debate somethin'? First, the president's plan includes at its very center a requirement that employers pay the cost of health insurance. In a way, this is a conservative position, since most Americans get their health care through their employers. It even makes accounting sense, because there is nowhere that the cost of health insurance isn't a factor in what's eventually in your paycheck. However, much to everyone's surprise, the Republicans went bats over it. Republicans these days go bats over virtually anything that might destroy Bill Clinton's chance to accomplish anything.
NEWS
February 18, 1993 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The township will begin picking up the tab for its commissioners' health, medical and accident insurance. The Board of Commissioners approved an ordinance Monday night authorizing the commissioners to receive the insurance. Recently adopted state legislation enables township commissioners to receive health coverage similar to that given to township employees, said Robert Breslin, acting solicitor. The commissioners also approved two other ordinances: One restricts parking on Second Street at Erickson Avenue and the second makes Fourth Street one-way in a westerly direction between Printz and Wanamaker Avenues between 6 and 9 a.m. Monday through Friday.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1986 | By Barbara Demick, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you can insure yourself, your spouse, your home and your automobile, why not another prized possession: your VCR? Such is the sales pitch many consumers hear when they go out to buy a new appliance. In the Philadelphia area, stores are offering policies resembling insurance for a ever-expanding assortment of products: stereos, videocassette recorders, lawn mowers, washers, computers, bicycles, refrigerators and even tires. Basically, if it can break, someone will try to sell you a policy to get it fixed.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Rachel Zamzow, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tony Burke was an energetic 2-year-old who loved drawing purple pictures of Barney and jumping on trampolines. But then his parents began to notice how he would grunt instead of talk, and couldn't look anyone in the eye. Before his third birthday, in 2005, he was diagnosed with autism. "It felt like my heart had been ripped out," said his mother, Suzanne Burke of Philadelphia. Seeking the best care, his parents found applied behavior analysis (ABA), a one-on-one therapy considered the most effective treatment to date for autism.
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BUSINESS
August 20, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Prospect Medical Holdings Inc., which bought Delaware County's Crozer-Keystone Health System Inc., has formed a new entity to provide medical professional and general liability insurance at Crozer and joined Cassatt Insured Group, of Malvern. Crozer was a founding member of Cassatt in 1991. The malpractice insurer's other members are Abington – Jefferson Health, Aria – Jefferson Health, Grand View Health, and Penn Medicine Chester County Hospital. Cassatt said last month that it won 84 percent of its trials from 2008 through 2015.
NEWS
August 12, 2016 | By Chris Palmer, Staff Writer
Bogus insurance. Fraudulent registrations. Stolen cars disguised and resold to unsuspecting customers. Those were some of the tactics prosecutors say were used by dozens of people and three corporations in what they described as an auto-theft and insurance-fraud ring that operated in Philadelphia for years. "This was a massive criminal enterprise," District Attorney Seth Williams said Wednesday as he announced charges against 32 people. Assistant District Attorney Linda Montag, who oversaw the investigation, described the ring as "a detailed, intricate criminal organization with many moving parts," allowing coconspirators to generate tens of thousands of dollars in profits.
BUSINESS
August 4, 2016
Health insurers have requested rate changes for individual plans that will be offered this fall on New Jersey's Affordable Care Act marketplace, according to data posted Monday on HealthCare.gov. The biggest requested increase was from Oxford Health Insurance Inc., a unit of UnitedHealthcare. Its Oxford NJ EPO (exclusive provider organization) asked for an average rate increase of 32.3 percent, which would affect an estimated 3,441 people. The state's largest insurer, Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey, requested increases for individual plans ranging from slightly less than 1 percent for its basic catastrophic plan to 7.55 percent for an Advantage exclusive provider plan.
BUSINESS
August 4, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Health insurers have requested rate changes -- including an increase of up to 32.3 percent -- for individual plans that will be offered this fall on New Jersey's Affordable Care Act marketplace this fall, according to data posted Monday on the federal web site HealthCare.gov. However, 12 of 19 insurance plans, effective Jan. 1, are seeking increases of less than 10 percent. The biggest requested increase was from Oxford Health Insurance Inc., a unit of UnitedHealthcare. Its Oxford NJ EPO (exclusive provider organization)
NEWS
July 29, 2016 | By Karen Langley, HARRISBURG BUREAU
Saying their own costs have risen, health insurance companies made their cases to state regulators Wednesday for double-digit rate increases next year for individual policies in Pennsylvania. The requests before the Insurance Department include proposed average rate increases of 17.2 percent for Aetna Health Inc., 25.4 percent to 48.1 percent for Highmark companies, 0.9 percent to 16.2 percent for UPMC companies, and 19.9 percent to 22.5 percent for Independence Blue Cross companies, according to the department.
TRAVEL
July 25, 2016
Q: I recently took a seven­day trip to the national parks in the Florida Keys with Road Scholar. Travel insurance was included in the price of the trip. Road Scholar contracted out the trip to a tour operator in Orlando, which provided the vans and tour guides. On the last stop of our trip before heading to Miami airport, at Biscayne National Park in Homestead, we were advised by our guides that it was OK to leave our carry­ons in the vans. When we returned to our van, it had been broken into, and several of us had lost our bags.
NEWS
July 17, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck and Susan Snyder, STAFF WRITERS
More previously sealed documents were released Friday from Penn State's fight with its insurance company over who should cover the costs of the nearly $93 million in legal settlements the university has paid Jerry Sandusky's accusers. Most of the filings focus on the ongoing insurance dispute , but excerpts from new depositions of key university figures are included. The documents come from the same trove of court filings that earlier this week revealed one Sandusky accuser claimed he reported his abuse to Penn State's iconic head football coach Joe Paterno in 1976.
NEWS
July 13, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
The city has taken out a $1.2 million insurance policy against lawsuits it might face because of police action during the Democratic National Convention. The city's Office of Risk Management hired Arizona-based Berkley Assurance for primary coverage and Landmark American Insurance of Atlanta for excess coverage up to $5 million, city spokesman Mike Dunn said. The plan is being paid for with the Department of Justice's $43 million security grant to the city. It provides liability coverage for the city and police officers "in conjunction with errors and omissions while performing their professional duties," Dunn said.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
The special investigations unit of Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey generated $43.2 million in savings last year by rooting out fraud, the Newark, N.J., health insurer said Wednesday. Horizon said one of the latest trends in fraud is the "phantom doctor's office," which are shell offices that submit bogus claims using stolen insurance identification numbers and then vanish. Another increasingly common scheme, Horizon said, is "the impossible day," on which a doctor claims to have seen dozens or even hundreds of patients.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
Raymond and Sandy Loewe just got back from a trip to Australia, having achieved one of their life goals: visiting all seven continents. They aren't even close to retiring, though they are in their mid-70s. "We both go to work every day, she at a nonprofit and me at my financial-planning firm. We have no plans to retire, but we take 14 to 15 weeks off a year," Raymond Loewe said. One thing they worried about was their care later in life: The couple have no children. "As I started thinking about aging," he said, "I asked myself, 'Who's going to take care of us if we can't take care of ourselves?
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