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NEWS
June 22, 1987 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Services were to be held this morning for Marie Franchetti, vice president of an insurance brokerage firm and a nationally recognized specialist in aviation insurance, who died Friday. She was 44 and lived in South Philadelphia. Franchetti had worked for Rollins Burdick Hunter, an insurance brokerage service with offices in the Ledger Building, since 1984. Previously, she had worked for Corroon and Black, an insurance agency. "Marie was an aviation insurance specialist," said Gil White, a vice president of Rollins Burdick Hunter and a close friend.
SPORTS
March 29, 1997 | by Sam Donnellon, Daily News Sports Writer
Back in town from two-day owners summit in West Palm Beach, Phillies president and general partner Bill Giles sounded less optimistic about signing Curt Schilling in time for the pitcher's Monday midnight deadline. The problem? "I'm not sure we can get the right insurance," he said, watching the Phillies win their 17th spring training game last night against Toronto at Jack Russell Stadium. Giles would like 100 percent insurance on Schilling's right arm. American Specialty, the insurance company he is dealing with, might be unwilling to do that.
NEWS
September 11, 2009 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For all President Obama's tough talk about insurance companies Wednesday night, health-economics experts said his overhaul plan held little obvious pain for insurers. Requiring everyone to buy coverage - with government subsidies when necessary - would bring in millions of new customers, lower selling costs, and reduce the hidden tax that all privately insured people pay for those without insurance, experts said. Insurance companies would have to give up some of their most egregious practices - refusing to sell insurance to the people most likely to need it, for example, or dropping customers who get sick - but they would all be in the same boat.
NEWS
July 28, 1988 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
The New Jersey Attorney General's Office has launched a review of Camden County's practices for awarding its insurance business, according to Deputy Attorney General Daniel P. Reynolds. In a letter to Freeholder Michael J. DiPiero, Reynolds said that his office was examining whether the county complied with the state public contracts law when it awarded its no-bid insurance business, worth more than $3.7 million since the start of 1987. DiPiero, a Republican, asked the state Department of Community Affairs last month to examine the county's procedure for giving that insurance business to Democratic Party leaders, including the party treasurer, John Gallagher, and the treasurer of the current freeholder campaign, Peter DiGiambattista.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1998 | By Josh Goldstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER The Associated Press contributed to this story
In the weeks before the Allegheny health system filed for bankruptcy in July, it quadrupled the value - from $50 million to $200 million - of liability insurance policies covering its board of directors and officers. Allegheny's creditors staked claim to that money yesterday - just in case coverage lapses at year's end today. They informed the health system's directors and officers of their intention to pursue the insurance money. The committee representing Allegheny's 65,000 unsecured creditors wrote to board members and executives viewed as most responsible for Allegheny's financial collapse.
NEWS
June 28, 1994
Goll-lee! Isn't that health-care debate somethin'? First, the president's plan includes at its very center a requirement that employers pay the cost of health insurance. In a way, this is a conservative position, since most Americans get their health care through their employers. It even makes accounting sense, because there is nowhere that the cost of health insurance isn't a factor in what's eventually in your paycheck. However, much to everyone's surprise, the Republicans went bats over it. Republicans these days go bats over virtually anything that might destroy Bill Clinton's chance to accomplish anything.
NEWS
February 18, 1993 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The township will begin picking up the tab for its commissioners' health, medical and accident insurance. The Board of Commissioners approved an ordinance Monday night authorizing the commissioners to receive the insurance. Recently adopted state legislation enables township commissioners to receive health coverage similar to that given to township employees, said Robert Breslin, acting solicitor. The commissioners also approved two other ordinances: One restricts parking on Second Street at Erickson Avenue and the second makes Fourth Street one-way in a westerly direction between Printz and Wanamaker Avenues between 6 and 9 a.m. Monday through Friday.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Rachel Zamzow, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tony Burke was an energetic 2-year-old who loved drawing purple pictures of Barney and jumping on trampolines. But then his parents began to notice how he would grunt instead of talk, and couldn't look anyone in the eye. Before his third birthday, in 2005, he was diagnosed with autism. "It felt like my heart had been ripped out," said his mother, Suzanne Burke of Philadelphia. Seeking the best care, his parents found applied behavior analysis (ABA), a one-on-one therapy considered the most effective treatment to date for autism.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1986 | By Barbara Demick, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you can insure yourself, your spouse, your home and your automobile, why not another prized possession: your VCR? Such is the sales pitch many consumers hear when they go out to buy a new appliance. In the Philadelphia area, stores are offering policies resembling insurance for a ever-expanding assortment of products: stereos, videocassette recorders, lawn mowers, washers, computers, bicycles, refrigerators and even tires. Basically, if it can break, someone will try to sell you a policy to get it fixed.
BUSINESS
June 25, 1990 | By Janet L. Fix, Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer wire services contributed to this article
Envision going to your bank to cash a check and being offered a life insurance policy, or even auto insurance. Futuristic? Well, the future may be nearer than you think. Consumers can't now buy life, health, auto or homeowners insurance through their banks, but a law enacted last month in Delaware allows state-chartered banks there to underwrite and sell insurance nationwide for the first time. Leading the push by banks to get into insurance are Citibank and Chase Manhattan, two of the nation's largest banks, both of which have subsidiaries in Delaware that could be used to sell insurance nationwide.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 26, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Indianapolis-based Anthem Inc. said Friday that it would acquire Cigna Corp., a major national health insurer with Philadelphia origins and 1,100 local employees, in a deal that would create the largest health-insurance company in the United States. The $54.2 billion transaction is one in a series of health-insurer mergers announced recently as firms scramble to get on top of rapid changes in the marketplace. The combined company will have more than $115 billion in annual revenue and an enrollment of 53 million members.
NEWS
July 26, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Funeral services are scheduled Saturday, July 25, for Nicholas Monatesti, 75, formerly of Philadelphia, who died Friday, June 19, of a stroke at Flagstaff (Ariz.) Medical Center. Services are to begin at 11 a.m. at Christ the King Roman Catholic Church, 3205 Chesterfield Rd. Inurnment will be later. Mr. Monatesti lived in Downingtown from 1975 until 1983, moving to Lititz, Pa., and, later, Philadelphia. A little more than a year ago, he moved to Flagstaff, seeking good weather and mountain vistas, and to be closer to his son, Anthony "A.J.
NEWS
July 22, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jack Pincus, 87, of Bryn Mawr, a retired insurance broker, died Monday, July 13, of Lewy body dementia at his home. Mr. Pincus was born in Philadelphia and graduated from West Philadelphia High School, where he served as student government president. He attended what is now Drexel University before graduating from the University of Miami. Because he was not drafted when he became eligible for military service, Mr. Pincus enlisted in the Army National Guard. Following his service, Mr. Pincus joined the family business, Albert A. Pincus & Sons, which had been in the wholesale meat industry since 1947.
NEWS
July 8, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
When economist Dan Polsky set out to study how many doctors were in the health-insurance networks available to Obamacare customers, he found out it was hard - even for him. How hard? "Nine out of 10," said Polsky, executive director of the University of Pennsylvania's Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics. He concluded that many of the 10.2 million people who have bought insurance through the Affordable Care Act marketplace probably don't realize they are giving up access to many physicians and hospitals in order to get lower premiums.
NEWS
July 2, 2015 | By Caroline Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
James A. Nolan, 59, of New Hope, who worked in the family title insurance company his entire adult life, died Sunday, June 21, of liver cancer. The lifelong Bucks County resident, a 1974 graduate of Neshaminy High School, began working at Tohickon Abstract Co. in Holicong soon after graduating from Dartmouth College in 1978. At the time of his death, he was president and co-owner. His brother Patrick called him a "super-hard worker in the family business. " His wife, however, said his family came first.
NEWS
June 28, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
M.L. Simone isn't averse to risk. You might remember Simone, the self-proclaimed "most-educated coffee pourer in Philadelphia," who has a business degree and an art administration degree, and who first shared her insurance story here in December. She opened Hinge Cafe, a coffee bar/art gallery in Port Richmond when it was still a Maxwell House Coffee-drinking, blue-collar neighborhood. In Hinge's early years, Simone also risked not having health insurance. Starting a business put health insurance low on her list of priorities, not to mention that she couldn't afford it. But when her daughter was born five years ago, Simone jumped into the pre-Affordable Care Act individual health insurance market, paying a $600 monthly premium.
NEWS
June 27, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Now that the Supreme Court has for the second time declined to dismantle the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare, one might begin to get the impression that it is the law of the land - not only because it was duly passed by Congress and signed by the eponymous president, but also by virtue of being a reasonable response to one of the country's most pressing domestic policy problems. Of course, the landmark health-care reform has been all those things for more than five years.
NEWS
June 27, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
He was nominated by President George W. Bush and confirmed as a bedrock conservative, an antidote to other Republican nominees who in the past had too often sided with liberal colleagues, or so many conservatives believed. Supreme Court Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., the argument went during his confirmation hearings, was no closet liberal along the lines of Earl Warren or David Souter. And yet, for the second time in three years, Roberts on Thursday provided the central legal arguments for upholding the Affordable Care Act, a law that is anathema to many conservatives.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
After countless hours of courtroom argument, dozens of briefs, and seemingly endless legal maneuvering, the fate of President Obama's Affordable Care Act comes down to the meaning of six simple words. On June 28, 2012, when the U.S. Supreme Court first narrowly upheld the law, it seemed the bitter struggle over Obama's huge expansion of federally funded health care had come to an end. But the calm was short-lived. Within a few months, conservative legal theorists seized on a little-noticed sentence in the law that seemed to limit federal assistance for consumers to buy health insurance purchased on state-established exchanges, or marketplaces.
NEWS
June 17, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Obama administration on Monday gave Pennsylvania and Delaware a head start in the scramble to save residents from losing health insurance coverage, the possible result of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling expected this month. The action - conditional approval to establish state-based insurance marketplaces - moves forward both states' efforts to preserve health insurance subsidies for their citizens. Pennsylvania Insurance Commissioner Teresa Miller described it as a "contingency plan" with the potential to help more than 300,000 residents who had bought subsidized insurance.
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