CollectionsInsurance
IN THE NEWS

Insurance

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 22, 1987 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Services were to be held this morning for Marie Franchetti, vice president of an insurance brokerage firm and a nationally recognized specialist in aviation insurance, who died Friday. She was 44 and lived in South Philadelphia. Franchetti had worked for Rollins Burdick Hunter, an insurance brokerage service with offices in the Ledger Building, since 1984. Previously, she had worked for Corroon and Black, an insurance agency. "Marie was an aviation insurance specialist," said Gil White, a vice president of Rollins Burdick Hunter and a close friend.
BUSINESS
December 20, 2015
Where: Bala Cynwyd. Parent: Tokio Marine Group, Japan. Business: Sells insurance in many niches - bowling alleys, cyber security, yoga studios, pest control, zoos, professional liability. What's new: Now covers craft breweries. 2015 revenue: $2.9 billion. Employees: 2,000; 600 here.
SPORTS
March 29, 1997 | by Sam Donnellon, Daily News Sports Writer
Back in town from two-day owners summit in West Palm Beach, Phillies president and general partner Bill Giles sounded less optimistic about signing Curt Schilling in time for the pitcher's Monday midnight deadline. The problem? "I'm not sure we can get the right insurance," he said, watching the Phillies win their 17th spring training game last night against Toronto at Jack Russell Stadium. Giles would like 100 percent insurance on Schilling's right arm. American Specialty, the insurance company he is dealing with, might be unwilling to do that.
NEWS
September 11, 2009 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For all President Obama's tough talk about insurance companies Wednesday night, health-economics experts said his overhaul plan held little obvious pain for insurers. Requiring everyone to buy coverage - with government subsidies when necessary - would bring in millions of new customers, lower selling costs, and reduce the hidden tax that all privately insured people pay for those without insurance, experts said. Insurance companies would have to give up some of their most egregious practices - refusing to sell insurance to the people most likely to need it, for example, or dropping customers who get sick - but they would all be in the same boat.
NEWS
July 28, 1988 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
The New Jersey Attorney General's Office has launched a review of Camden County's practices for awarding its insurance business, according to Deputy Attorney General Daniel P. Reynolds. In a letter to Freeholder Michael J. DiPiero, Reynolds said that his office was examining whether the county complied with the state public contracts law when it awarded its no-bid insurance business, worth more than $3.7 million since the start of 1987. DiPiero, a Republican, asked the state Department of Community Affairs last month to examine the county's procedure for giving that insurance business to Democratic Party leaders, including the party treasurer, John Gallagher, and the treasurer of the current freeholder campaign, Peter DiGiambattista.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1998 | By Josh Goldstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER The Associated Press contributed to this story
In the weeks before the Allegheny health system filed for bankruptcy in July, it quadrupled the value - from $50 million to $200 million - of liability insurance policies covering its board of directors and officers. Allegheny's creditors staked claim to that money yesterday - just in case coverage lapses at year's end today. They informed the health system's directors and officers of their intention to pursue the insurance money. The committee representing Allegheny's 65,000 unsecured creditors wrote to board members and executives viewed as most responsible for Allegheny's financial collapse.
NEWS
June 28, 1994
Goll-lee! Isn't that health-care debate somethin'? First, the president's plan includes at its very center a requirement that employers pay the cost of health insurance. In a way, this is a conservative position, since most Americans get their health care through their employers. It even makes accounting sense, because there is nowhere that the cost of health insurance isn't a factor in what's eventually in your paycheck. However, much to everyone's surprise, the Republicans went bats over it. Republicans these days go bats over virtually anything that might destroy Bill Clinton's chance to accomplish anything.
NEWS
February 18, 1993 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The township will begin picking up the tab for its commissioners' health, medical and accident insurance. The Board of Commissioners approved an ordinance Monday night authorizing the commissioners to receive the insurance. Recently adopted state legislation enables township commissioners to receive health coverage similar to that given to township employees, said Robert Breslin, acting solicitor. The commissioners also approved two other ordinances: One restricts parking on Second Street at Erickson Avenue and the second makes Fourth Street one-way in a westerly direction between Printz and Wanamaker Avenues between 6 and 9 a.m. Monday through Friday.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1986 | By Barbara Demick, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you can insure yourself, your spouse, your home and your automobile, why not another prized possession: your VCR? Such is the sales pitch many consumers hear when they go out to buy a new appliance. In the Philadelphia area, stores are offering policies resembling insurance for a ever-expanding assortment of products: stereos, videocassette recorders, lawn mowers, washers, computers, bicycles, refrigerators and even tires. Basically, if it can break, someone will try to sell you a policy to get it fixed.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Rachel Zamzow, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tony Burke was an energetic 2-year-old who loved drawing purple pictures of Barney and jumping on trampolines. But then his parents began to notice how he would grunt instead of talk, and couldn't look anyone in the eye. Before his third birthday, in 2005, he was diagnosed with autism. "It felt like my heart had been ripped out," said his mother, Suzanne Burke of Philadelphia. Seeking the best care, his parents found applied behavior analysis (ABA), a one-on-one therapy considered the most effective treatment to date for autism.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 11, 2016
By Veronique de Rugy It's no surprise that trust in the government is at an all-time low. Government failures and promises broken by administration officials in the last eight years alone have been plentiful. Take the botched recovery after the Great Recession. The Obama administration promised that if the government spent $800 billion in stimulus, unemployment wouldn't rise above 8.8 percent. The plan was adopted, the spending was on its way, and the unemployment rate shot up above 10 percent and hovered at this painful level for months.
TRAVEL
May 9, 2016
Q: I know you have written about insurance for travel in the past but I wanted to bring a matter to your attention. The United Airlines website offers Allianz travel insurance, but when it came to covering my expenses, I felt it was a "bait and switch" insurance policy that outlines what is covered but in reality does not cover anything beyond travel delay. Here's what happened: A friend and I purchased tickets to fly from Newark to Panama in January. In addition to paying $1,353 for the flight, we purchased the Allianz travel insurance shown on the United Airlines site for an additional $80. The travel insurance indicated it would cover trip cancellation, travel delay, and trip interruption.
NEWS
May 1, 2016 | By Justine McDaniel, Staff Writer
A judge on Friday disputed state prosecutors' call for him to remove himself from the multimillion-dollar insurance fraud case against Bucks County's politically connected Risoldi family, putting off a decision about their request and delaying the trial for what could be months. After a 31/2-hour hearing in Doylestown that saw sharp exchanges between attorneys during testimony by the lead prosecutor, who said Chester County Judge Thomas G. Gavin has a bias toward the Risoldi family, Gavin said he would decide in the coming weeks, but did not specify a date.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, Staff Writer
Swiss insurer Zurich Insurance Group has acquired the 2.0 University Place office building near 41st and Market Streets for $420 a square foot - among the city's highest purchase prices ever for a commercial property. Zurich paid $41.3 million Tuesday for the five-story building in a deal that also commits the company to completing up to $1.8 million in interior construction work, developer Scott Mazo said. Mazo invested $31 million in the 98,000-square-foot eco-friendly office project at the largely untested western edge of Philadelphia's University City neighborhood.
NEWS
April 14, 2016
ISSUE | HEALTH CARE Doctors' role is key Dr. Peter Ubel's commentary about the complexity of health-insurance plans made the important point that caregivers are unprepared to help patients make cost-conscious decisions about their care ("Choices, plans overwhelming for patients," Friday). Yet many employers that adopt consumer-driven coverage pay little attention to the evidence that employees with high-deductible plans tend to cut back on beneficial as well as wasteful care. That jeopardizes patients' health and could undermine employers' savings when poorly managed health results in high-cost care or disability leaves.
NEWS
April 9, 2016
By Peter Ubel Even before Obamacare became the law of the land, the U.S. health-care system was undergoing a dramatic transformation. Millions of people were shifting from generous health-insurance plans to consumer-directed ones that pair low monthly premiums with high out-of-pocket costs. This shift has been encouraged by employers eager to reduce the cost of employee benefits. It has also been encouraged by market enthusiasts who contend that the U.S. health-care system needs to be more like the traditional consumer economy.
NEWS
April 5, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
When a Philadelphia grand jury slammed Visit Philadelphia in a March 16 report for quietly settling a $200,000 embezzlement and failing to go to prosecutors, the tourism agency claimed it had little choice. Board chairman Manuel Stamatakis said the alleged embezzler, Joyce Levitt, offered through her lawyer to repay what was taken provided that the agency didn't go to the police. Had the agency reported the theft, Levitt likely would have spent all of her money on legal fees, leaving nothing for the agency.
NEWS
April 1, 2016
By Sally C. Pipes Last week marked Obamacare's sixth birthday. President Obama is, of course, celebrating the occasion. At a recent speech in Milwaukee, the president offered a catalog of the law's supposed successes. Unfortunately, not one of his boasts stands up to scrutiny. He's ignored the growing pile of evidence that his namesake is failing the American people. Take his biggest boast - that Obamacare has helped 20 million people gain coverage over the past six years.
NEWS
March 19, 2016
ISSUE | HEALTH CARE Premium shock I have seen increases in health-insurance premiums and deductibles for my family. I have no idea why there was a huge increase over last year's rates ("In Pa. and N.J., Affordable Care Act is anything but," Monday). Certainly the old method of "let the insurance companies decide" didn't work. Now the Affordable Care Act isn't working. Is "Medicare for all" worth a try? |Diane Doyle, Quakertown, dibet@icloud.com
NEWS
March 17, 2016
ISSUE | LONG-TERM CARE Premiums too costly Premium increases of up to 130 percent for long-term-care insurance will be a financial nightmare for thousands of seniors in Pernnsylvania ("Insurers explain hikes in long-term care," "Insurers bailing out," Friday). They will put policyholders between a rock and a hard place: Do we accept and pay the increases, if we can afford them, or will we be forced to let the policies lapse and lose the value of the premiums we have paid? Even worse, we would be without coverage, because getting a new policy at our age would be financially prohibitive if we could find a company to offer a policy.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|