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NEWS
June 22, 1987 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Services were to be held this morning for Marie Franchetti, vice president of an insurance brokerage firm and a nationally recognized specialist in aviation insurance, who died Friday. She was 44 and lived in South Philadelphia. Franchetti had worked for Rollins Burdick Hunter, an insurance brokerage service with offices in the Ledger Building, since 1984. Previously, she had worked for Corroon and Black, an insurance agency. "Marie was an aviation insurance specialist," said Gil White, a vice president of Rollins Burdick Hunter and a close friend.
BUSINESS
December 20, 2015
Where: Bala Cynwyd. Parent: Tokio Marine Group, Japan. Business: Sells insurance in many niches - bowling alleys, cyber security, yoga studios, pest control, zoos, professional liability. What's new: Now covers craft breweries. 2015 revenue: $2.9 billion. Employees: 2,000; 600 here.
SPORTS
March 29, 1997 | by Sam Donnellon, Daily News Sports Writer
Back in town from two-day owners summit in West Palm Beach, Phillies president and general partner Bill Giles sounded less optimistic about signing Curt Schilling in time for the pitcher's Monday midnight deadline. The problem? "I'm not sure we can get the right insurance," he said, watching the Phillies win their 17th spring training game last night against Toronto at Jack Russell Stadium. Giles would like 100 percent insurance on Schilling's right arm. American Specialty, the insurance company he is dealing with, might be unwilling to do that.
NEWS
September 11, 2009 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For all President Obama's tough talk about insurance companies Wednesday night, health-economics experts said his overhaul plan held little obvious pain for insurers. Requiring everyone to buy coverage - with government subsidies when necessary - would bring in millions of new customers, lower selling costs, and reduce the hidden tax that all privately insured people pay for those without insurance, experts said. Insurance companies would have to give up some of their most egregious practices - refusing to sell insurance to the people most likely to need it, for example, or dropping customers who get sick - but they would all be in the same boat.
NEWS
July 28, 1988 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
The New Jersey Attorney General's Office has launched a review of Camden County's practices for awarding its insurance business, according to Deputy Attorney General Daniel P. Reynolds. In a letter to Freeholder Michael J. DiPiero, Reynolds said that his office was examining whether the county complied with the state public contracts law when it awarded its no-bid insurance business, worth more than $3.7 million since the start of 1987. DiPiero, a Republican, asked the state Department of Community Affairs last month to examine the county's procedure for giving that insurance business to Democratic Party leaders, including the party treasurer, John Gallagher, and the treasurer of the current freeholder campaign, Peter DiGiambattista.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1998 | By Josh Goldstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER The Associated Press contributed to this story
In the weeks before the Allegheny health system filed for bankruptcy in July, it quadrupled the value - from $50 million to $200 million - of liability insurance policies covering its board of directors and officers. Allegheny's creditors staked claim to that money yesterday - just in case coverage lapses at year's end today. They informed the health system's directors and officers of their intention to pursue the insurance money. The committee representing Allegheny's 65,000 unsecured creditors wrote to board members and executives viewed as most responsible for Allegheny's financial collapse.
NEWS
June 28, 1994
Goll-lee! Isn't that health-care debate somethin'? First, the president's plan includes at its very center a requirement that employers pay the cost of health insurance. In a way, this is a conservative position, since most Americans get their health care through their employers. It even makes accounting sense, because there is nowhere that the cost of health insurance isn't a factor in what's eventually in your paycheck. However, much to everyone's surprise, the Republicans went bats over it. Republicans these days go bats over virtually anything that might destroy Bill Clinton's chance to accomplish anything.
NEWS
February 18, 1993 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The township will begin picking up the tab for its commissioners' health, medical and accident insurance. The Board of Commissioners approved an ordinance Monday night authorizing the commissioners to receive the insurance. Recently adopted state legislation enables township commissioners to receive health coverage similar to that given to township employees, said Robert Breslin, acting solicitor. The commissioners also approved two other ordinances: One restricts parking on Second Street at Erickson Avenue and the second makes Fourth Street one-way in a westerly direction between Printz and Wanamaker Avenues between 6 and 9 a.m. Monday through Friday.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1986 | By Barbara Demick, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you can insure yourself, your spouse, your home and your automobile, why not another prized possession: your VCR? Such is the sales pitch many consumers hear when they go out to buy a new appliance. In the Philadelphia area, stores are offering policies resembling insurance for a ever-expanding assortment of products: stereos, videocassette recorders, lawn mowers, washers, computers, bicycles, refrigerators and even tires. Basically, if it can break, someone will try to sell you a policy to get it fixed.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Rachel Zamzow, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tony Burke was an energetic 2-year-old who loved drawing purple pictures of Barney and jumping on trampolines. But then his parents began to notice how he would grunt instead of talk, and couldn't look anyone in the eye. Before his third birthday, in 2005, he was diagnosed with autism. "It felt like my heart had been ripped out," said his mother, Suzanne Burke of Philadelphia. Seeking the best care, his parents found applied behavior analysis (ABA), a one-on-one therapy considered the most effective treatment to date for autism.
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NEWS
January 17, 2016 | By Lisa Gillespie, KAISER HEALTH NEWS
The rate of Hispanic children without health insurance fell to a historic low in 2014, the first year that key parts of Obamacare took effect, but they still represent a disproportionate share of the nation's uninsured youth, according to a new study. About 300,000 Hispanic children gained insurance in 2014 from 2013, dropping the number of uninsured to 1.7 million, researchers said. Their uninsured rate fell to 9.7 percent, almost 2 percentage points below the year before. In New Jersey, one of the 10 states with the largest populations of Hispanic children, the uninsurance rate for that group was 7.0 percent, compared with 7.4 percent in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
January 13, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
The former owner of the historic Bucks County Playhouse was sentenced Monday to 21/2 years in prison after collecting about $240,000 from bogus insurance claims he made on behalf of the theater and attempting the same tactic for a second theater he owned. Ralph Miller, 69, of New Hope, was convicted of money laundering and mail fraud in May by a federal jury in Philadelphia. In sentencing Miller, U.S. District Judge Cynthia Rufe called him a "charlatan" and "snake oil salesman," according to Assistant U.S. Attorney K.T. Newton.
NEWS
December 28, 2015 | By Tom Moor, ANGIE'S LIST
Do you ever wonder about all the factors that go into how much you pay for car insurance? The answer isn't as simple as it might seem. There are dozens of factors that go into how much drivers pay for auto insurance. "Auto insurance used to be so easy," said Ken Henry, owner of Henry Insurance Agency in Cincinnati. "All you needed to know was someone's age, accidents or tickets and city or county. If your neighbor had the same car, was your age with a similar driving record, and was with the same insurance company, you both got the same rate.
BUSINESS
December 21, 2015
Kids out of school for the holidays? You could take them to the Star Wars film at the Franklin Institute's IMAX theater. They could amble through the heart's arteries or marvel at stars in the planetarium. Or they could gaze at Jamie Maguire's hair stuck to a bicycle helmet. Why is his hair and helmet on display? Consider it an object lesson. The reason James "Jamie" Maguire Jr., 55, was able to give $1.5 million to the Franklin Institute was, in part, because the helmet saved his life in a bicycle crash last year.
BUSINESS
December 20, 2015
Where: Bala Cynwyd. Parent: Tokio Marine Group, Japan. Business: Sells insurance in many niches - bowling alleys, cyber security, yoga studios, pest control, zoos, professional liability. What's new: Now covers craft breweries. 2015 revenue: $2.9 billion. Employees: 2,000; 600 here.
BUSINESS
December 16, 2015
Vanguard Group looks set to add more than $200 billion in new assets during 2015 for a second straight year, taking the total to $3.5 trillion. It could be a bit more. But the Malvern mutual-fund giant is minimizing the value of one asset in every Vanguard fund's portfolio: shares of Vanguard Group Inc., the company that manages Vanguard's funds. Every Vanguard fund (and, through the funds, every Vanguard shareholder) owns a piece of Vanguard Group. How much is Vanguard worth?
BUSINESS
December 13, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
An anti-abortion group with no religious affiliation cannot claim an exemption from the Affordable Care Act requirement that employers provide employee health insurance covering contraception, a federal judge has ruled in Harrisburg. U.S. District Judge John E. Jones III found that Real Alternatives, a pregnancy and parenting counseling agency that advises women to carry pregnancies to full term and avoid abortions, has no right to an exemption from the ACA requirement, because it cites only moral objections to it and provides no religious basis for its position.
BUSINESS
November 27, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
MANNA, a nonprofit founded in 1990 to provide meals to those with HIV/AIDS, has been serving people with other illnesses for nearly a decade. But to do so, it had to depend on philanthropy - until this year, when MANNA struck a deal with Health Partners Plans Inc. to provide meals to diabetics who are members of Health Partners' Medicaid program. For MANNA, it's a big deal, the first time it has tapped insurance dollars. "Nobody had ever figured out how to pay for this service," said Susan Daugherty, a registered dietitian and chief executive of MANNA (Metropolitan Area Neighborhood Nutrition Alliance)
NEWS
November 16, 2015 | By Mauree Miller, For The Inquirer
Whether you are insured through your employer, the Obamacare marketplace, or Medicare, choosing the right plan is only the start of being a wise health-care consumer. It's now open-enrollment season for the marketplace, Medicare, and most employer plans, so you may be seeing a lot of advertising on the subject. Here are 10 tips to help you get started selecting a plan and then getting the most out of it: Read your options carefully. Even if you are choosing the same plan you had for 2015, there could be changes to it for 2016.
NEWS
October 6, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - New Jersey's largest health insurer on Monday defended a new alliance it has struck with some of the state's hospital systems that's intended to lower costs for consumers, even as lawmakers questioned the criteria it used to choose its partners. Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey last month announced it had formed the Omnia Health Alliance with six of the state's 20 hospital systems and a physicians group. The only South Jersey hospital system included in the alliance is Inspira.
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