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NEWS
October 19, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Deborah Fasoline quit smoking. The 57-year-old Bensalem truck driver had tried twice before to stop but failed. This time was different. This time she squashed her lifelong habit like a spent cigarette butt under foot. Fasoline says she has gone seven straight months without lighting up. That's one month more than the Affordable Care Act demands to expunge the up-to-50 percent tobacco surcharge on smokers' monthly premiums. So you can understand why Fasoline can't wait for the marketplace to reopen next month.
NEWS
June 22, 1987 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Services were to be held this morning for Marie Franchetti, vice president of an insurance brokerage firm and a nationally recognized specialist in aviation insurance, who died Friday. She was 44 and lived in South Philadelphia. Franchetti had worked for Rollins Burdick Hunter, an insurance brokerage service with offices in the Ledger Building, since 1984. Previously, she had worked for Corroon and Black, an insurance agency. "Marie was an aviation insurance specialist," said Gil White, a vice president of Rollins Burdick Hunter and a close friend.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Rachel Zamzow, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tony Burke was an energetic 2-year-old who loved drawing purple pictures of Barney and jumping on trampolines. But then his parents began to notice how he would grunt instead of talk, and couldn't look anyone in the eye. Before his third birthday, in 2005, he was diagnosed with autism. "It felt like my heart had been ripped out," said his mother, Suzanne Burke of Philadelphia. Seeking the best care, his parents found applied behavior analysis (ABA), a one-on-one therapy considered the most effective treatment to date for autism.
SPORTS
March 29, 1997 | by Sam Donnellon, Daily News Sports Writer
Back in town from two-day owners summit in West Palm Beach, Phillies president and general partner Bill Giles sounded less optimistic about signing Curt Schilling in time for the pitcher's Monday midnight deadline. The problem? "I'm not sure we can get the right insurance," he said, watching the Phillies win their 17th spring training game last night against Toronto at Jack Russell Stadium. Giles would like 100 percent insurance on Schilling's right arm. American Specialty, the insurance company he is dealing with, might be unwilling to do that.
NEWS
September 11, 2009 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For all President Obama's tough talk about insurance companies Wednesday night, health-economics experts said his overhaul plan held little obvious pain for insurers. Requiring everyone to buy coverage - with government subsidies when necessary - would bring in millions of new customers, lower selling costs, and reduce the hidden tax that all privately insured people pay for those without insurance, experts said. Insurance companies would have to give up some of their most egregious practices - refusing to sell insurance to the people most likely to need it, for example, or dropping customers who get sick - but they would all be in the same boat.
NEWS
July 28, 1988 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
The New Jersey Attorney General's Office has launched a review of Camden County's practices for awarding its insurance business, according to Deputy Attorney General Daniel P. Reynolds. In a letter to Freeholder Michael J. DiPiero, Reynolds said that his office was examining whether the county complied with the state public contracts law when it awarded its no-bid insurance business, worth more than $3.7 million since the start of 1987. DiPiero, a Republican, asked the state Department of Community Affairs last month to examine the county's procedure for giving that insurance business to Democratic Party leaders, including the party treasurer, John Gallagher, and the treasurer of the current freeholder campaign, Peter DiGiambattista.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1998 | By Josh Goldstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER The Associated Press contributed to this story
In the weeks before the Allegheny health system filed for bankruptcy in July, it quadrupled the value - from $50 million to $200 million - of liability insurance policies covering its board of directors and officers. Allegheny's creditors staked claim to that money yesterday - just in case coverage lapses at year's end today. They informed the health system's directors and officers of their intention to pursue the insurance money. The committee representing Allegheny's 65,000 unsecured creditors wrote to board members and executives viewed as most responsible for Allegheny's financial collapse.
NEWS
June 28, 1994
Goll-lee! Isn't that health-care debate somethin'? First, the president's plan includes at its very center a requirement that employers pay the cost of health insurance. In a way, this is a conservative position, since most Americans get their health care through their employers. It even makes accounting sense, because there is nowhere that the cost of health insurance isn't a factor in what's eventually in your paycheck. However, much to everyone's surprise, the Republicans went bats over it. Republicans these days go bats over virtually anything that might destroy Bill Clinton's chance to accomplish anything.
NEWS
February 18, 1993 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The township will begin picking up the tab for its commissioners' health, medical and accident insurance. The Board of Commissioners approved an ordinance Monday night authorizing the commissioners to receive the insurance. Recently adopted state legislation enables township commissioners to receive health coverage similar to that given to township employees, said Robert Breslin, acting solicitor. The commissioners also approved two other ordinances: One restricts parking on Second Street at Erickson Avenue and the second makes Fourth Street one-way in a westerly direction between Printz and Wanamaker Avenues between 6 and 9 a.m. Monday through Friday.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1986 | By Barbara Demick, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you can insure yourself, your spouse, your home and your automobile, why not another prized possession: your VCR? Such is the sales pitch many consumers hear when they go out to buy a new appliance. In the Philadelphia area, stores are offering policies resembling insurance for a ever-expanding assortment of products: stereos, videocassette recorders, lawn mowers, washers, computers, bicycles, refrigerators and even tires. Basically, if it can break, someone will try to sell you a policy to get it fixed.
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NEWS
October 19, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Deborah Fasoline quit smoking. The 57-year-old Bensalem truck driver had tried twice before to stop but failed. This time was different. This time she squashed her lifelong habit like a spent cigarette butt under foot. Fasoline says she has gone seven straight months without lighting up. That's one month more than the Affordable Care Act demands to expunge the up-to-50 percent tobacco surcharge on smokers' monthly premiums. So you can understand why Fasoline can't wait for the marketplace to reopen next month.
NEWS
October 12, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
  In June, Anthony Capone said he liked his AmeriHealth Medicare Advantage plan so much he persuaded his 89-year-old mother and aunt to make the switch. Things were going along fine until recently, when the Mount Laurel businessman's renewal notice arrived in the mail. He opened the package and was taken aback. His monthly premium had spiked to $62 a month, a $23 rise. Other fees - in-hospital co-pay (up to $175), Part D deductible ($25), and ambulance ($100) - have also risen.
NEWS
October 8, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than a decade after prostate cancer became the economic driver behind proton beam therapy in the U.S., it still isn't clear that men treated with the technology do better than those who get less costly radiation treatments. That's why expert groups have recently advised against insurance coverage of proton therapy for prostate cancer - and why some private plans are refusing to pay for it. The Catch-22 is that this pullback is hampering a clinical trial co-led by the University of Pennsylvania that would finally settle the question of superiority.
NEWS
October 5, 2014 | Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Scott R. Hafetz is a glass-half-full kind of guy. So last fall, when the launch of the Affordable Care Act website had his health insurance broker colleagues fretting about their future - OK, panicking - Hafetz figured things would somehow work out. He was right. "I figured there would be a place for us," says Hafetz, an independent health insurance broker and owner of Hafetz & Associates in Linwood, N.J. A year ago, health insurance brokers and agents were looking like an endangered species.
NEWS
October 1, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alan Beaumont Worthington, 89, of Plymouth Meeting, a World War II veteran and insurance claims company executive, died Saturday, Sept. 20, of congestive heart failure at Masonic Village in Lafayette Hill. Mr. Worthington was a leader in the Philadelphia-area insurance claims business. As president of Weeks-Worthington Adjustment Co. in Jenkintown, he provided independent claims-adjustment services for larger insurance firms. The firm was sold, and Mr. Worthington stayed on until retiring nine years ago. He was treasurer of the Pennsylvania Association of Independent Insurance Adjusters for many years.
NEWS
September 30, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thomas E. Lynch Sr., 71, of Broomall, an insurance underwriter and volunteer for veterans' organizations, died Friday, Sept. 19, of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at Genesis HealthCare-Wayne Center in Wayne. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Lynch graduated from St. Joseph's Preparatory School. In 1965, he earned a bachelor's degree in marketing from St. Joseph's University, where he founded and was president of the Marketing Club. After graduating, he joined the Insurance Co. of North America (INA)
NEWS
September 20, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Martin R. Stenson, 71, of Springfield, Delaware County, a longtime insurance salesman and active community worker, died Sunday, Sept. 14, of Alzheimer's disease at his home. Mr. Stenson attended St. Thomas More Boys' High School in Philadelphia, where he forged many of his lifelong friendships. He graduated in 1952 and then served in the Army. In 1960, he was hired as a salesman with Liberty Mutual Insurance Co. His office was first in Bala Cynwyd and later in Springfield. He stayed with the firm for almost 40 years.
NEWS
September 15, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the 1970s and 1980s, Samuel W. Madara and his wife, Connie, traveled overseas several times to share ideas about insurance "with a broad group of insurance people," she said. They and others in their group were not simply Americans bringing their methods to other cultures, she said, but were also learning in seminars from foreign insurers. "It was an exchange of ideas peculiar in China" at the time, she said in a phone interview, because in the days before private enterprise, "they were all government workers.
NEWS
August 30, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jeffrey B. Wallner, 65, of Cherry Hill, an insurance broker who owned Walnut Street Associates in Marlton, died of cancer on Wednesday, Aug. 27, at home. Mr. Wallner graduated from Cheltenham High School in 1967 and earned a bachelor's in business at Temple University in 1971. He later completed studies to become a chartered life underwriter, with expertise in life insurance and estate planning. "He started in the insurance business right out of college," his wife, Heather, said.
NEWS
August 18, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Shirley Tax spends her days at Chinatown Medical Services fielding questions from patients who bought health insurance on the Affordable Care Act marketplace. Most of those queries revolve around Independence Blue Cross' best-selling, silver-level Keystone HMO Proactive plan. Tax says patients signed up for the tiered plan without really understanding how it worked. So when they receive a bill they take it to Tax and ask her to explain it. "Most of them didn't have insurance before," Tax, 26, says of her clients, many of whom are immigrants.
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