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NEWS
August 28, 2012 | By Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press
CHICAGO - The nation's most influential pediatricians group says the health benefits of circumcision in newborn boys outweigh any risks and insurance companies should pay for it. In its latest policy statement on circumcision, a procedure that has been declining nationwide, the American Academy of Pediatrics moves closer to an endorsement but says the decision should be up to parents. "It's not a verdict from on high," said policy co-author Andrew Freedman. "There's not a one-size-fits-all answer.
NEWS
July 6, 2013 | By Tom Johnson, NJ SPOTLIGHT
In a lawsuit with big implications for state utility customers, Public Service Enterprise Group and three of its subsidiaries accused 10 insurance companies of shortchanging them $456 million for damage to their power grid. Insurers say they will cover only $50 million in payouts, arguing that policies restrict reimbursements above that amount in specific flood zones. PSEG and its subsidiaries filed a lawsuit June 18. Utility customers could end up paying the bill to repair the infrastructure if the court upholds the insurance companies' view.
NEWS
July 12, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sidney Grossman, 91, who after a near-fatal accident while in his mid-20s was inspired to go into the insurance business, died June 29 in Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte, N.C., of complications after a fall. Mr. Grossman had homes in Northeast Philadelphia, Medford Lakes, and Ocala, Fla. Mr. Grossman learned to work hard as a child and kept his work ethic throughout his life. From age 5, Mr. Grossman worked with his parents and five siblings in the family's deli at 40th Street and Girard Avenue.
NEWS
February 2, 1988 | By Laurie Hollman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Just as New Jersey motorists begin paying a new $66 surcharge on their cars, controversy has flared over whether insurance companies were allowed to charge too much money to issue policies through the state's auto-insurance fund. The state's Public Advocate's Office and a state assemblyman who has specialized in insurance matters say that companies were allowed to collect higher-than-necessary fees and that the money could have been used to offset the need for the $66 levy. "Tens, if not hundreds, of millions of dollars would have been available," Deputy Public Advocate Donald W. Bunda wrote the Insurance Department earlier this month.
NEWS
October 4, 1990 | By Jodi Enda, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
In the midst of his campaign for re-election, Gov. Casey yesterday embarked on a second campaign, this one to sell motorists on the state's new auto-insurance law and to prod insurance companies to help drivers save money. Casey announced in Pittsburgh that he was sending letters to the presidents of the state's 231 insurance companies, urging them to educate motorists who are confused about the new law and who are being bombarded with "misleading" information by opponents of the law. The governor's letter criticized trial lawyers for trying to discourage motorists from selecting a type of no-fault insurance that will save them the most money.
NEWS
March 22, 1988 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
A group of Philadelphia lawmakers disclosed yesterday that they had formed their own auto-insurance company designed to lower the price of coverage for city residents. But one member of the group, Rep. Ralph Acosta, conceded that a similar company that he and other lawmakers promoted last year was later determined by the state Insurance Department to be a "fictitious insurer. " Acosta said he was serving as a board member with the new company, Futura Mutual Insurance Co., because "we've got to keep finding ways to help the people of the city.
NEWS
October 10, 1989
Every Pennsylvanian has a stake in the insurance industry's bid for a 28 percent increase in premiums for workers' compensation - which covers job- related illness and injuries. Such a big increase, costing employers nearly $700 million more in the next year, would hurt the state's competitiveness. Yet workers, who never know when they might need this coverage for health care and lost income, must be sure that the system stays on a sound financial basis. Right now, these vital interests must be balanced by Insurance Commissioner Constance B. Foster in her rate decision.
NEWS
March 3, 1986 | By Suzanne Gordon, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Havertown businessman, who needs larger quarters for his growing insurance company, has told the Haverford school board that he is interested in purchasing the vacant Llanerch School for offices. Walter Lenhard, owner of Continental Life Insurance Co. at 812 Darby Rd., told the board on Feb. 24 that the school, also on Darby Road, would be a fitting location for his company. The company sells insurance and performs computer work for other insurance companies. "It would be a very attractive building and an asset to the neighborhood," Lenhard said in an interview later.
NEWS
December 18, 1997 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A prominent Center City lawyer accused of building a fraudulent insurance empire on a network of shell companies was found guilty yesterday in U.S. District Court of fraud and racketeering charges. Allen W. Stewart, 58, a former partner with Morgan, Lewis and Bockius, was convicted on all 135 counts of an indictment for mail and wire fraud, money laundering, and racketeering in a case that hinged on whether criminal activity on his part forced the financial failure of two insurance companies under his control.
NEWS
April 16, 1995 | By Amy Zurzola, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Pennsauken First Aid Squad has a new leader and is heading toward a new way of doing business. Mike Coyle, the squad's newly hired chief, and township officials held the first in a series of four public meetings last week to discuss plans to begin billing insurance companies for ambulance services. The next meeting is at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow at St. Cecelia's Catholic School on Camden Avenue. The meetings are a result of an advisory committee's report on ways to improve service at the formerly all-volunteer squad, which was suffering under manpower shortages that left it unable to respond to 450 calls in 1994.
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BUSINESS
October 11, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - No new laws are likely to be passed this year to permit "ride-share" companies such as Uber and Lyft to operate in Pennsylvania, legislators said Thursday after a state House committee hearing on the issue. And the panel's chairman said he would support efforts to remove Philadelphia from any statewide regulation, because the Philadelphia Parking Authority regulates taxis and limousines in the city. In the rest of the state, the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission regulates cabs and other for-hire vehicles.
NEWS
September 28, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - The Democratic and Republican nominees for Congress in New Jersey's Third District agree on a number of issues important to South Jersey voters, such as recovering from Hurricane Sandy and investing in Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst. So, to draw a contrast in a competitive race that has drawn national interest, Democrat Aimee Belgard and Republican Tom MacArthur each tried to send one clear message to voters during their first joint appearance Friday in an NJTV interview: Don't trust my opponent.
NEWS
August 25, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Andrew Tuono's new girlfriend came with a warning. Dating Tiffany Galati, daughter of an auto mechanic with long-held ties to the Philadelphia mob, would one day get him killed, friends advised. That prediction nearly proved prescient last year, with an attack that left Tuono alive, but with three bullets in his gut - and his girlfriend's father accused of ordering the hit. Now, the details of that attempt on Tuono's life, sketched in government court filings this month, offer the latest account of one facet of Ronald Galati's deepening legal morass.
NEWS
August 14, 2014 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
National Democrats have targeted South Jersey for one of their two opening salvos in the fall House campaigns, underscoring how a district in suburban Philadelphia has become a key battleground, one of the few in the country where Democrats see a serious chance to pick off a Republican-held seat. Democrats' congressional campaign arm on Tuesday launched a cable television ad in the Burlington and Ocean County district where U.S. Rep. Jon Runyan (R., N.J.) is retiring, leaving a contest between Democrat Aimee Belgard, a Burlington County freeholder, and Republican Tom MacArthur, a former mayor in North Jersey and former insurance executive.
NEWS
August 4, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
William D. Widerman was a starting pitcher for the Duke University baseball team and a member of the V-12 Navy College Training Program intended to produce officers during World War II. There came a time when his North Carolina college team played an exhibition game against a military team, starring no less than the Red Sox leftfielder Ted Williams, who had led the American League in homers in 1941 and 1942. The reason that the major-league star was playing against a college team, likely in 1943, is lost to Widerman family memory, but a Marines website reports that some of Williams' training to become a Marine Corps pilot took place at Chapel Hill, N.C. The Splendid Splinter made the day memorable.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Breaking a tradition that dates to the 1950s, Haverford Township will discontinue using ambulance services provided by two volunteer fire companies and will contract with the University of Pennsylvania Health Systems for emergency medical services. The township says the move will save $440,000 annually. Llanerch Volunteer Fire and Ambulance Company has provided service for 63 years, the Manoa Fire Company for 59. But with fewer volunteers available during critical hours, the costs of hiring emergency medical technicians to cover shifts, and concerns about response times, the Delaware County township elected to solicit bids for the critical service.
NEWS
June 26, 2014
ISSUE | HEALTH CARE Get well quick With great sadness, I read that Abington Health is closing its doors to people with mental illnesses because the program is not profitable ("Abington Health to close facility, change care plan," June 20). Under an expansion of Medicaid, most likely, many of these clients could be served. Yet Gov. Corbett insists on a health program that will make money for insurance companies rather than a health program that will provide service for people who are desperately in need.
NEWS
June 23, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - The Corbett administration on Friday announced the list of insurance companies that had met its qualifications to provide coverage to hundreds of thousands of the uninsured by early 2015. Under Gov. Corbett's proposed Medicaid expansion alternative, nine insurance companies would provide health care to as many as 600,000 low-income residents - most of them the working poor - who make too much for traditional Medicaid but whose employers provide no coverage. "The governor is incredibly pleased with the response," said Jennifer Branstetter, Corbett's secretary of policy and planning.
NEWS
May 30, 2014 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
HOW DOES a mob-connected fraudster - who allegedly kept deer blood at his South Philly auto-body shop to stage fake "Hollywood" accidents - land a $1.8 million city contract to fix cop cars and other vehicles? This is Philadelphia. He knew a guy. "We are here today to announce the arrest - once again - of Ron Galati Sr. and his co-conspirators for a nearly $5 million insurance-fraud scheme," District Attorney Seth Williams said yesterday, before delving into the latest round of charges against Galati.
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