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NEWS
August 28, 2012 | By Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press
CHICAGO - The nation's most influential pediatricians group says the health benefits of circumcision in newborn boys outweigh any risks and insurance companies should pay for it. In its latest policy statement on circumcision, a procedure that has been declining nationwide, the American Academy of Pediatrics moves closer to an endorsement but says the decision should be up to parents. "It's not a verdict from on high," said policy co-author Andrew Freedman. "There's not a one-size-fits-all answer.
NEWS
July 6, 2013 | By Tom Johnson, NJ SPOTLIGHT
In a lawsuit with big implications for state utility customers, Public Service Enterprise Group and three of its subsidiaries accused 10 insurance companies of shortchanging them $456 million for damage to their power grid. Insurers say they will cover only $50 million in payouts, arguing that policies restrict reimbursements above that amount in specific flood zones. PSEG and its subsidiaries filed a lawsuit June 18. Utility customers could end up paying the bill to repair the infrastructure if the court upholds the insurance companies' view.
NEWS
July 12, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sidney Grossman, 91, who after a near-fatal accident while in his mid-20s was inspired to go into the insurance business, died June 29 in Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte, N.C., of complications after a fall. Mr. Grossman had homes in Northeast Philadelphia, Medford Lakes, and Ocala, Fla. Mr. Grossman learned to work hard as a child and kept his work ethic throughout his life. From age 5, Mr. Grossman worked with his parents and five siblings in the family's deli at 40th Street and Girard Avenue.
NEWS
February 2, 1988 | By Laurie Hollman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Just as New Jersey motorists begin paying a new $66 surcharge on their cars, controversy has flared over whether insurance companies were allowed to charge too much money to issue policies through the state's auto-insurance fund. The state's Public Advocate's Office and a state assemblyman who has specialized in insurance matters say that companies were allowed to collect higher-than-necessary fees and that the money could have been used to offset the need for the $66 levy. "Tens, if not hundreds, of millions of dollars would have been available," Deputy Public Advocate Donald W. Bunda wrote the Insurance Department earlier this month.
NEWS
October 4, 1990 | By Jodi Enda, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
In the midst of his campaign for re-election, Gov. Casey yesterday embarked on a second campaign, this one to sell motorists on the state's new auto-insurance law and to prod insurance companies to help drivers save money. Casey announced in Pittsburgh that he was sending letters to the presidents of the state's 231 insurance companies, urging them to educate motorists who are confused about the new law and who are being bombarded with "misleading" information by opponents of the law. The governor's letter criticized trial lawyers for trying to discourage motorists from selecting a type of no-fault insurance that will save them the most money.
NEWS
March 22, 1988 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
A group of Philadelphia lawmakers disclosed yesterday that they had formed their own auto-insurance company designed to lower the price of coverage for city residents. But one member of the group, Rep. Ralph Acosta, conceded that a similar company that he and other lawmakers promoted last year was later determined by the state Insurance Department to be a "fictitious insurer. " Acosta said he was serving as a board member with the new company, Futura Mutual Insurance Co., because "we've got to keep finding ways to help the people of the city.
NEWS
April 17, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Princeton businesswoman Kim Pimley serves on nonprofit boards, ran for mayor a few years back, and keeps in shape by bashing a 150-pound punching bag. The type of person who runs up escalators, the 55-year-old was always overflowing with energy. Until, all of a sudden, she wasn't. She started to feel short of breath in early January, and wondered whether she had caught a bug. But she felt progressively worse, at one point unable to climb the stairs without sitting to rest halfway up. Within days she was sent to the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, where she received unthinkable news: A rare, aggressive disease, its cause unknown, was attacking her heart.
NEWS
October 10, 1989
Every Pennsylvanian has a stake in the insurance industry's bid for a 28 percent increase in premiums for workers' compensation - which covers job- related illness and injuries. Such a big increase, costing employers nearly $700 million more in the next year, would hurt the state's competitiveness. Yet workers, who never know when they might need this coverage for health care and lost income, must be sure that the system stays on a sound financial basis. Right now, these vital interests must be balanced by Insurance Commissioner Constance B. Foster in her rate decision.
NEWS
March 3, 1986 | By Suzanne Gordon, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Havertown businessman, who needs larger quarters for his growing insurance company, has told the Haverford school board that he is interested in purchasing the vacant Llanerch School for offices. Walter Lenhard, owner of Continental Life Insurance Co. at 812 Darby Rd., told the board on Feb. 24 that the school, also on Darby Road, would be a fitting location for his company. The company sells insurance and performs computer work for other insurance companies. "It would be a very attractive building and an asset to the neighborhood," Lenhard said in an interview later.
NEWS
December 18, 1997 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A prominent Center City lawyer accused of building a fraudulent insurance empire on a network of shell companies was found guilty yesterday in U.S. District Court of fraud and racketeering charges. Allen W. Stewart, 58, a former partner with Morgan, Lewis and Bockius, was convicted on all 135 counts of an indictment for mail and wire fraud, money laundering, and racketeering in a case that hinged on whether criminal activity on his part forced the financial failure of two insurance companies under his control.
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NEWS
April 17, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Princeton businesswoman Kim Pimley serves on nonprofit boards, ran for mayor a few years back, and keeps in shape by bashing a 150-pound punching bag. The type of person who runs up escalators, the 55-year-old was always overflowing with energy. Until, all of a sudden, she wasn't. She started to feel short of breath in early January, and wondered whether she had caught a bug. But she felt progressively worse, at one point unable to climb the stairs without sitting to rest halfway up. Within days she was sent to the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, where she received unthinkable news: A rare, aggressive disease, its cause unknown, was attacking her heart.
NEWS
March 19, 2016
ISSUE | HEALTH CARE Premium shock I have seen increases in health-insurance premiums and deductibles for my family. I have no idea why there was a huge increase over last year's rates ("In Pa. and N.J., Affordable Care Act is anything but," Monday). Certainly the old method of "let the insurance companies decide" didn't work. Now the Affordable Care Act isn't working. Is "Medicare for all" worth a try? |Diane Doyle, Quakertown, dibet@icloud.com
NEWS
March 12, 2016
Aging baby boomers in Pennsylvania thought they were being careful planners when they bought long-term-care insurance to cover future nursing home expenses and end-of-life costs while protecting their assets. Boy, were they wrong. The insurance companies they paid premiums to now say they can't afford the policies and want consumers to bail them out. Four companies want rate hikes ranging from 14 percent to 130 percent, depending on the coverage. The increases would affect 75,000 Pennsylvanians.
NEWS
March 7, 2016
Frank Wilson is a retired Inquirer book editor who blogs at Books, Inq. - The Epilogue In Crippled America , Donald Trump's campaign book, which hit stores in November, Trump notes that his critics "have been claiming I haven't put out enough specifics. " His response is interesting. Not only does he not deny the charge. He cites it as a point in his favor: "There's a good reason for this, and it fits perfectly with my overall philosophy of leadership: Many of our problems, caused by years of stupid decisions or no decisions at all, have grown into a huge mess.
NEWS
February 28, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
In 2010, Forbes declared Alexion Pharmaceuticals' Soliris the world's "single most expensive drug," at nearly $410,000 a year. It seems to have gone up since. An organization representing Canadian provinces announced two weeks ago that it had called off negotiations with the drugmaker over its $500,000 asking price. A watchdog agency in the United Kingdom said the company was seeking $700,000 there. In the United States, hospitals buy the drug, which is infused like chemotherapy, and they bill insurance companies directly.
NEWS
December 28, 2015 | By Tom Moor, ANGIE'S LIST
Do you ever wonder about all the factors that go into how much you pay for car insurance? The answer isn't as simple as it might seem. There are dozens of factors that go into how much drivers pay for auto insurance. "Auto insurance used to be so easy," said Ken Henry, owner of Henry Insurance Agency in Cincinnati. "All you needed to know was someone's age, accidents or tickets and city or county. If your neighbor had the same car, was your age with a similar driving record, and was with the same insurance company, you both got the same rate.
NEWS
December 2, 2015
ISSUE | UNIVERSITY CITY Community partners In Friday's column , Inga Saffron reached an inescapable conclusion: Universities were complicit in postwar urban-renewal programs that failed to sustain strong, diverse neighborhoods. She suggested that requiring payments in lieu of taxes (PILOTs) by nonprofit institutions is the logical form of redress. But that narrative fails to account for 20 years of successful efforts in University City. And the conclusion is shortsighted - no program of PILOTs could match the impact that anchor institutions make today.
NEWS
September 30, 2015 | By Will Bunch, Daily News Columnist
YOU PROBABLY missed it in all the hoopla over Pope Francis - especially since the seemingly tireless 78-year-old pontiff was running around making some new, headline-worthy pronouncement every 45 minutes or so during his exhausting North American tour that wrapped up in Philadelphia. But the first-ever pope from the Americas actually said some pretty nice things about our capitalism. It was just this summer, after all, that Francis called capitalism's excess "the dung of the devil. " It sounds kind of bad when you put it that way. But on Wednesday, the pope found himself before the millionaires-financed-by-billionaires known as the U.S. Congress.
NEWS
August 24, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
There are a lot of things Sean Hartmann likes about his job as a tree trimmer. It pays well, and the roadsides where he works are often beautiful, especially in the spring and fall. But he definitely does not love poison ivy. It's everywhere. Hairy vines the size of his forearm climb the trees he must cut. Even if he can manage not to touch it, it winds up on the chain saw and in the wood chipper. Fragments fly all around him. Until this year, the result was constantly blistered, oozing skin.
BUSINESS
August 14, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fidelity National Information Services Inc., a provider of banking and payments technology, said Wednesday it agreed to buy Wayne's SunGard Data Systems Inc. in a deal valued at $9.1 billion, including the assumption of $4 billion of debt. SunGard's software is used by 14,000 banks, private-equity firms, asset managers, and insurance companies to automate trading, administering portfolios, accounting for assets, and managing risk. "We believe SunGard is a perfect fit," said Gary A. Norcross, president and chief executive officer of Fidelity, which is known as FIS and is anchored in the traditional banking sector.
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