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NEWS
March 10, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Decker had all the signs. He often missed things that actors said on TV. Hearing in crowds was a challenge. And when he came home each day from work in a noisy data center, where cooling fans whirred nonstop, his wife would tell him he talked too loudly. Why not get hearing aids? A big reason: the cost. Decker, 70, of Northeast Philadelphia, learned what millions of aging baby boomers are starting to discover. High-end devices can cost $6,000 a pair, and most insurance plans cover a fraction of the cost at best.
NEWS
August 28, 2012 | By Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press
CHICAGO - The nation's most influential pediatricians group says the health benefits of circumcision in newborn boys outweigh any risks and insurance companies should pay for it. In its latest policy statement on circumcision, a procedure that has been declining nationwide, the American Academy of Pediatrics moves closer to an endorsement but says the decision should be up to parents. "It's not a verdict from on high," said policy co-author Andrew Freedman. "There's not a one-size-fits-all answer.
NEWS
July 6, 2013 | By Tom Johnson, NJ SPOTLIGHT
In a lawsuit with big implications for state utility customers, Public Service Enterprise Group and three of its subsidiaries accused 10 insurance companies of shortchanging them $456 million for damage to their power grid. Insurers say they will cover only $50 million in payouts, arguing that policies restrict reimbursements above that amount in specific flood zones. PSEG and its subsidiaries filed a lawsuit June 18. Utility customers could end up paying the bill to repair the infrastructure if the court upholds the insurance companies' view.
NEWS
July 12, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sidney Grossman, 91, who after a near-fatal accident while in his mid-20s was inspired to go into the insurance business, died June 29 in Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte, N.C., of complications after a fall. Mr. Grossman had homes in Northeast Philadelphia, Medford Lakes, and Ocala, Fla. Mr. Grossman learned to work hard as a child and kept his work ethic throughout his life. From age 5, Mr. Grossman worked with his parents and five siblings in the family's deli at 40th Street and Girard Avenue.
NEWS
February 2, 1988 | By Laurie Hollman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Just as New Jersey motorists begin paying a new $66 surcharge on their cars, controversy has flared over whether insurance companies were allowed to charge too much money to issue policies through the state's auto-insurance fund. The state's Public Advocate's Office and a state assemblyman who has specialized in insurance matters say that companies were allowed to collect higher-than-necessary fees and that the money could have been used to offset the need for the $66 levy. "Tens, if not hundreds, of millions of dollars would have been available," Deputy Public Advocate Donald W. Bunda wrote the Insurance Department earlier this month.
NEWS
October 4, 1990 | By Jodi Enda, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
In the midst of his campaign for re-election, Gov. Casey yesterday embarked on a second campaign, this one to sell motorists on the state's new auto-insurance law and to prod insurance companies to help drivers save money. Casey announced in Pittsburgh that he was sending letters to the presidents of the state's 231 insurance companies, urging them to educate motorists who are confused about the new law and who are being bombarded with "misleading" information by opponents of the law. The governor's letter criticized trial lawyers for trying to discourage motorists from selecting a type of no-fault insurance that will save them the most money.
NEWS
March 22, 1988 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
A group of Philadelphia lawmakers disclosed yesterday that they had formed their own auto-insurance company designed to lower the price of coverage for city residents. But one member of the group, Rep. Ralph Acosta, conceded that a similar company that he and other lawmakers promoted last year was later determined by the state Insurance Department to be a "fictitious insurer. " Acosta said he was serving as a board member with the new company, Futura Mutual Insurance Co., because "we've got to keep finding ways to help the people of the city.
NEWS
October 10, 1989
Every Pennsylvanian has a stake in the insurance industry's bid for a 28 percent increase in premiums for workers' compensation - which covers job- related illness and injuries. Such a big increase, costing employers nearly $700 million more in the next year, would hurt the state's competitiveness. Yet workers, who never know when they might need this coverage for health care and lost income, must be sure that the system stays on a sound financial basis. Right now, these vital interests must be balanced by Insurance Commissioner Constance B. Foster in her rate decision.
NEWS
March 3, 1986 | By Suzanne Gordon, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Havertown businessman, who needs larger quarters for his growing insurance company, has told the Haverford school board that he is interested in purchasing the vacant Llanerch School for offices. Walter Lenhard, owner of Continental Life Insurance Co. at 812 Darby Rd., told the board on Feb. 24 that the school, also on Darby Road, would be a fitting location for his company. The company sells insurance and performs computer work for other insurance companies. "It would be a very attractive building and an asset to the neighborhood," Lenhard said in an interview later.
NEWS
December 18, 1997 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A prominent Center City lawyer accused of building a fraudulent insurance empire on a network of shell companies was found guilty yesterday in U.S. District Court of fraud and racketeering charges. Allen W. Stewart, 58, a former partner with Morgan, Lewis and Bockius, was convicted on all 135 counts of an indictment for mail and wire fraud, money laundering, and racketeering in a case that hinged on whether criminal activity on his part forced the financial failure of two insurance companies under his control.
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NEWS
March 25, 2014
Third wheels As a Green Party member, I rejoice at the suggestion that independent candidates can "challenge the Democratic machine's rotten approach to leadership" ("Dropped sting hit machine," March 18). But what wasn't mentioned, or perhaps not considered, is how almost impossible it is for third parties to get on the ballot, let alone raise funds needed to compete. While Democrats can decide behind closed doors whom they will run, Greens and others need thousands of petition signatures which usually are challenged by the major parties.
NEWS
March 25, 2014
For the last half-century, millions of American women have been digging into their purses to pay for birth control pills and other contraceptive methods that weren't covered by their health insurance plans. Unfortunately, that won't change if the Supreme Court, following arguments expected Tuesday in the latest high-profile challenge to the Affordable Care Act, decides to void provisions that increase birth control coverage. The court will consider two cases, one brought by a Lancaster County cabinetry business, Conestoga Wood Specialities, whose Mennonite owners say it would violate their religious beliefs to help pay for employees' birth control.
NEWS
March 10, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Decker had all the signs. He often missed things that actors said on TV. Hearing in crowds was a challenge. And when he came home each day from work in a noisy data center, where cooling fans whirred nonstop, his wife would tell him he talked too loudly. Why not get hearing aids? A big reason: the cost. Decker, 70, of Northeast Philadelphia, learned what millions of aging baby boomers are starting to discover. High-end devices can cost $6,000 a pair, and most insurance plans cover a fraction of the cost at best.
NEWS
February 23, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TOMS RIVER, N.J. - A day after Gov. Christie held one of his signature town-hall meetings to assure wary New Jersey residents that he was committed to Sandy recovery, the state's top elected Democrat swung through this Shore town to promote legislation he says would put the process on track. "We know this government has failed. We're not about pointing fingers. We're trying to find solutions," Senate President Stephen Sweeney told about 50 residents at his town hall meeting at the Toms River Elks Lodge.
NEWS
February 13, 2014
GOV. Corbett's budget for next year, introduced last week, had something unusual: more new spending than he's ever offered. There's spending for veterans, for job training, the elderly and $400 million for education. Can you say "election year"? Just a few months ago, the Corbett administration was talking about the state ending this year with a deficit of several hundred million dollars - mainly because of lagging collections of taxes on businesses, sales and personal income. While the state is on the road to economic recovery, it seems stuck in a 25 mph speed zone.
NEWS
January 20, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mike Gambardello, a construction worker from Pennsauken, has been hunting for 17 of his 25 years. He recalls clearly and with pride taking down his first deer, a four-point buck, in the Pine Barrens at age 15. His father was there to see it. "It's the biggest high you can ever get in your life," he said. But in the last several years, Gambardello has become increasingly aware of other hunters in the woods: Coyotes. "Eight years ago, it was very, very rare," he said. "Now walk down the road, and you see more coyote tracks than deer tracks.
NEWS
December 29, 2013 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
The twice-extended deadline to enroll in subsidized health insurance and be covered from the start of the new year has finally passed. Well, sort of. Administration officials said last week they would try to arrange Jan. 1 coverage for people who have had trouble getting through the cranky website. Meanwhile, insurers are switching their focus to confirming that the people who have successfully signed up appear in company records. The problem is that the transfer of customer data from healthcare.gov to insurance companies and the quality of the information has been - you guessed it - glitchy.
NEWS
November 25, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert F. Rink, 82, of Wayne, a life insurance company executive, died Friday, Nov. 15, at Paoli Memorial Hospital of a thoracic aortic aneurysm. Starting in 1955, Mr. Rink worked in the life insurance industry, rising to president of the Life Insurance Co. of North America, which became part of Cigna Corp. After retiring in 1989, he taught business and finance courses in the degree-completion program at Eastern College. Born in Pittsburgh, Mr. Rink graduated from Mount Lebanon High School and earned a bachelor's degree in economics from the University of Pittsburgh.
NEWS
October 24, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia has invested $50 million in a new biotech start-up that seeks to be the nation's first commercial provider of gene therapy, company officials announced Tuesday. Spark Therapeutics will assume control over two clinical trials that originated at the prominent teaching hospital - one in which patients with a rare form of blindness already have regained some vision, the other an early-stage effort to treat hemophilia B. Jeffrey D. Marrazzo, Spark's CEO, said the goal was to tackle still more genetic diseases in the future, including other rare forms of blindness, blood disorders, and two neurodegenerative diseases that he declined to identify.
NEWS
October 22, 2013 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than a month after a fire gutted its Burlington County meat warehouse, leaving a rancid smell hanging in the air, Dietz & Watson has hauled away up to 10 million pounds of meat and demolished most of the building. The stench is virtually gone from the company site in Delanco Township, some residents in nearby Edgewater Park said, and an odor-neutralizing solution has spouted out of supply hoses and aerosol fogging nozzles around the clock. "We're pleased and feel very good that those neighbors are breathing fresh air again," company spokesman Steve Aaron said last week.
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