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NEWS
August 28, 2012 | By Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press
CHICAGO - The nation's most influential pediatricians group says the health benefits of circumcision in newborn boys outweigh any risks and insurance companies should pay for it. In its latest policy statement on circumcision, a procedure that has been declining nationwide, the American Academy of Pediatrics moves closer to an endorsement but says the decision should be up to parents. "It's not a verdict from on high," said policy co-author Andrew Freedman. "There's not a one-size-fits-all answer.
NEWS
July 6, 2013 | By Tom Johnson, NJ SPOTLIGHT
In a lawsuit with big implications for state utility customers, Public Service Enterprise Group and three of its subsidiaries accused 10 insurance companies of shortchanging them $456 million for damage to their power grid. Insurers say they will cover only $50 million in payouts, arguing that policies restrict reimbursements above that amount in specific flood zones. PSEG and its subsidiaries filed a lawsuit June 18. Utility customers could end up paying the bill to repair the infrastructure if the court upholds the insurance companies' view.
NEWS
July 12, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sidney Grossman, 91, who after a near-fatal accident while in his mid-20s was inspired to go into the insurance business, died June 29 in Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte, N.C., of complications after a fall. Mr. Grossman had homes in Northeast Philadelphia, Medford Lakes, and Ocala, Fla. Mr. Grossman learned to work hard as a child and kept his work ethic throughout his life. From age 5, Mr. Grossman worked with his parents and five siblings in the family's deli at 40th Street and Girard Avenue.
BUSINESS
August 14, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fidelity National Information Services Inc., a provider of banking and payments technology, said Wednesday it agreed to buy Wayne's SunGard Data Systems Inc. in a deal valued at $9.1 billion, including the assumption of $4 billion of debt. SunGard's software is used by 14,000 banks, private-equity firms, asset managers, and insurance companies to automate trading, administering portfolios, accounting for assets, and managing risk. "We believe SunGard is a perfect fit," said Gary A. Norcross, president and chief executive officer of Fidelity, which is known as FIS and is anchored in the traditional banking sector.
NEWS
February 2, 1988 | By Laurie Hollman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Just as New Jersey motorists begin paying a new $66 surcharge on their cars, controversy has flared over whether insurance companies were allowed to charge too much money to issue policies through the state's auto-insurance fund. The state's Public Advocate's Office and a state assemblyman who has specialized in insurance matters say that companies were allowed to collect higher-than-necessary fees and that the money could have been used to offset the need for the $66 levy. "Tens, if not hundreds, of millions of dollars would have been available," Deputy Public Advocate Donald W. Bunda wrote the Insurance Department earlier this month.
NEWS
October 4, 1990 | By Jodi Enda, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
In the midst of his campaign for re-election, Gov. Casey yesterday embarked on a second campaign, this one to sell motorists on the state's new auto-insurance law and to prod insurance companies to help drivers save money. Casey announced in Pittsburgh that he was sending letters to the presidents of the state's 231 insurance companies, urging them to educate motorists who are confused about the new law and who are being bombarded with "misleading" information by opponents of the law. The governor's letter criticized trial lawyers for trying to discourage motorists from selecting a type of no-fault insurance that will save them the most money.
NEWS
March 22, 1988 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
A group of Philadelphia lawmakers disclosed yesterday that they had formed their own auto-insurance company designed to lower the price of coverage for city residents. But one member of the group, Rep. Ralph Acosta, conceded that a similar company that he and other lawmakers promoted last year was later determined by the state Insurance Department to be a "fictitious insurer. " Acosta said he was serving as a board member with the new company, Futura Mutual Insurance Co., because "we've got to keep finding ways to help the people of the city.
NEWS
October 10, 1989
Every Pennsylvanian has a stake in the insurance industry's bid for a 28 percent increase in premiums for workers' compensation - which covers job- related illness and injuries. Such a big increase, costing employers nearly $700 million more in the next year, would hurt the state's competitiveness. Yet workers, who never know when they might need this coverage for health care and lost income, must be sure that the system stays on a sound financial basis. Right now, these vital interests must be balanced by Insurance Commissioner Constance B. Foster in her rate decision.
NEWS
March 3, 1986 | By Suzanne Gordon, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Havertown businessman, who needs larger quarters for his growing insurance company, has told the Haverford school board that he is interested in purchasing the vacant Llanerch School for offices. Walter Lenhard, owner of Continental Life Insurance Co. at 812 Darby Rd., told the board on Feb. 24 that the school, also on Darby Road, would be a fitting location for his company. The company sells insurance and performs computer work for other insurance companies. "It would be a very attractive building and an asset to the neighborhood," Lenhard said in an interview later.
NEWS
December 18, 1997 | By Dianna Marder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A prominent Center City lawyer accused of building a fraudulent insurance empire on a network of shell companies was found guilty yesterday in U.S. District Court of fraud and racketeering charges. Allen W. Stewart, 58, a former partner with Morgan, Lewis and Bockius, was convicted on all 135 counts of an indictment for mail and wire fraud, money laundering, and racketeering in a case that hinged on whether criminal activity on his part forced the financial failure of two insurance companies under his control.
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NEWS
August 24, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
There are a lot of things Sean Hartmann likes about his job as a tree trimmer. It pays well, and the roadsides where he works are often beautiful, especially in the spring and fall. But he definitely does not love poison ivy. It's everywhere. Hairy vines the size of his forearm climb the trees he must cut. Even if he can manage not to touch it, it winds up on the chain saw and in the wood chipper. Fragments fly all around him. Until this year, the result was constantly blistered, oozing skin.
BUSINESS
August 14, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fidelity National Information Services Inc., a provider of banking and payments technology, said Wednesday it agreed to buy Wayne's SunGard Data Systems Inc. in a deal valued at $9.1 billion, including the assumption of $4 billion of debt. SunGard's software is used by 14,000 banks, private-equity firms, asset managers, and insurance companies to automate trading, administering portfolios, accounting for assets, and managing risk. "We believe SunGard is a perfect fit," said Gary A. Norcross, president and chief executive officer of Fidelity, which is known as FIS and is anchored in the traditional banking sector.
NEWS
June 8, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Susan," as the 66-year-old engineer likes to be called when he's in women's attire, said there's a "don't ask, don't tell" policy in his South Jersey home. "My kids suspect something, but they don't know the extent of" his cross-dressing, he said Saturday at the Convention Center for the 14th annual Philadelphia Trans-Health Conference. Susan wore an auburn wig, full makeup, panty hose, jewelry, and a peach-colored, crocheted dress that hugged his 40D silicone breasts. The three-day gathering, which organizers said is the largest such conference with free registration, focused on issues affecting the transgender community - from legal and medical to parental and employer concerns.
REAL_ESTATE
June 1, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Today's home buyers - millennial first-timers and everyone else, it seems - are looking for houses in move-in condition. Move-in translates to houses with no expensive problems. Even though credit remains rather tight these days, home buyers are opting to take on larger mortgages rather than take on the work required by shells or fixer-uppers they can purchase more cheaply. Among older resale houses, one issue that keeps coming up is old wiring, especially the first-generation electrical system known as "knob and tube.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
THE MEN WHO took Kevin Kless' life in a senseless, drunken rampage on the streets of Old City in 2012 are paying their time in prison, and now the bars that served those men to the point of reckless inebriation will pay, too. In a settlement finalized this week in the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas, the insurance companies for the now-shuttered G Lounge and Lucy's Hat Shop agreed to pay a total of $7 million to settle a wrongful-death suit filed...
BUSINESS
March 9, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
When newly developed software works - when clients start buying it - the talk gets big fast: "We are changing the way code is built," says Chris Gali, cofounder of Enterprise Cloudworks , from the conference room past the pool table in his high-rise offices at 1818 Market St. "Right now, we are 52 people. By the end of the year, we will be 75. My belief is that in two and a half years, we'll be 350, right here on Market Street, Philadelphia," says Jim Rourke, the firm's president.
BUSINESS
January 2, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Spark Therapeutics Inc., which hopes to turn decades of gene-therapy research at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia into commercial cures for diseases, has filed papers to conduct an initial public stock offering. In its S-1 filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Spark said it had applied to trade on the Nasdaq global market under the symbol "ONCE. " The ticker symbol refers to the hope Spark's medicine will cure, not simply treat, some genetic diseases, including types of blindness and hemophilia.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - No new laws are likely to be passed this year to permit "ride-share" companies such as Uber and Lyft to operate in Pennsylvania, legislators said Thursday after a state House committee hearing on the issue. And the panel's chairman said he would support efforts to remove Philadelphia from any statewide regulation, because the Philadelphia Parking Authority regulates taxis and limousines in the city. In the rest of the state, the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission regulates cabs and other for-hire vehicles.
NEWS
September 28, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - The Democratic and Republican nominees for Congress in New Jersey's Third District agree on a number of issues important to South Jersey voters, such as recovering from Hurricane Sandy and investing in Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst. So, to draw a contrast in a competitive race that has drawn national interest, Democrat Aimee Belgard and Republican Tom MacArthur each tried to send one clear message to voters during their first joint appearance Friday in an NJTV interview: Don't trust my opponent.
NEWS
August 25, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Andrew Tuono's new girlfriend came with a warning. Dating Tiffany Galati, daughter of an auto mechanic with long-held ties to the Philadelphia mob, would one day get him killed, friends advised. That prediction nearly proved prescient last year, with an attack that left Tuono alive, but with three bullets in his gut - and his girlfriend's father accused of ordering the hit. Now, the details of that attempt on Tuono's life, sketched in government court filings this month, offer the latest account of one facet of Ronald Galati's deepening legal morass.
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