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NEWS
February 10, 1986 | By Maureen Graham, Special to The Inquirer
Nearly 150 Washington Township teenagers showed up at a dance Saturday night sponsored by Middle School students to raise money for a school drug counselor who was fired last month - but they were turned away at the door. The affair, which had been scheduled for 7 p.m., was canceled earlier in the day, unbeknown to most of the students, because of a dispute over insurance between the owner of the hall, George Maloney of Turnersville, and the leasors of the building, the Italian-American Club.
NEWS
August 14, 1986 | By Richard Burke, Inquirer Staff Writer
The fare increases proposed by Philadelphia's beleaguered Yellow Cab Co. would raise only about 41 percent of the money the company says is needed to fund a self-insurance program. John S. Estey, an attorney for Yellow Cab, said yesterday that the remaining money - almost $2 million a year - would come from the company's current operating revenues. The company, which has filed for bankruptcy-court protection, has lost money in four of the last five years. Yellow Cab accounts for about half of Philadelphia's 1,200 cabs and is facing the loss of its insurance on Oct. 1. Estey said the company can not get insurance from any other source and will go out of business if the state does not approve its plan to operate a self-insurance program.
NEWS
June 24, 1986 | By JIM SMITH, Daily News Staff Writer
A federal judge has been asked by insurance underwriters to void a $1.6 million insurance policy the Flyers had on goaltender Pelle Lindbergh, who died last year after his car hit a wall in New Jersey. Underwriters at Lloyd's of London, in a suit filed yesterday, contend the policy contained an exclusion barring coverage for losses caused by Lindbergh's "own criminal or felonious act. " "Pelle Lindbergh's death was caused or contributed to by his criminal acts of driving under the influence of alcohol and exceeding the legal (speed)
NEWS
March 12, 1992 | By Dave Urbanski, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Unprotected by tiny helmets and shoulder pads, Deptford Midget Football is getting banged up in a rough game of Catch-22 over a $10 million insurance policy. The parents who run the township midget football league are planning a carnival in mid-April to raise money to pay next year's football bills. They want to use the township's most central location, which is Deptford's Central Elementary School field, just behind the township building on Cooper Street and Delsea Drive. However, school-district officials said a carnival on school property presents high accident possibilities, and they are requiring the midget football league to carry at least $10 million in insurance for the six-day event.
NEWS
June 16, 1988 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a step toward what they called a "black common market," leaders of the National Conference of Black Mayors proposed yesterday to create their own municipal insurance company. Former Gary, Ind., Mayor Richard G. Hatcher, the chief advocate of the move, said more black money should stay in black hands. That, he said, should include some of the $1 billion spent yearly for insurance by the 300 communities headed by black mayors. Hatcher said he was sure that insurance companies reinvest some of the money they get in South Africa and in other ways repugnant to blacks.
NEWS
October 15, 1987 | By Kurt Pfitzer, Special to The Inquirer
For six months last year, Mark Schwartz and a dozen other men in various stages of middle age played pick-up basketball games every Monday night at Rydal Elementary School in Abington. The group, called the Over-The-Hill Basketball Club, used the court for free. This year, the club says it cannot afford to use the court because of an insurance requirement imposed by the Abington school board. A new board policy requires the club to secure a $500,000 single-limit insurance policy for liability resulting from bodily injury or property damage before it can play at the school.
NEWS
August 26, 2001 | By Eugene Kiely INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
It wasn't Jennifer Bencivengo's fault that the rental car she was driving two years ago suddenly veered off a tree-lined rural road in Burlington County when her right front tire went flat. Still, her insurance company - the Good Hands people - blamed her for the $2,700 worth of damage, terminated her policy, and forced her into a high-risk insurance plan that cost $4,500 a year. Most people would have grumbled, paid the bill, and moved on. But not this 23-year-old stay-at-home mother and her father, Joseph Griner, a high school chemistry teacher who can give everybody a lesson about how to make the system work for the little guy. They decided to challenge the company's decision by traveling through an arcane state-appeals process - without a lawyer, but armed with Griner's homemade video of the damaged car, which provided the key evidence.
SPORTS
March 20, 1997 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
Critics of Phillies president Bill Giles, and there are many since negotiations on a contract extension for righthander Curt Schilling dissolved in acrimony, have taken a Chicken Little approach to the incident: The sky is falling! The sky is falling! Giles, however, continues to adopt Yogi Berra's famous philosophy: It ain't over until it's over. In fact, he said, he is waiting for word from the team's insurance company that could result in another attempt to sign Schilling before his team breaks spring-training camp a week from Sunday.
NEWS
November 8, 1997 | by Jim Nolan, Daily News Staff Writer
It is no substitute for a mother and a father. But at least young Haley Rabinowitz, orphaned by murder, will not grow up poor. The Provident Mutual insurance company yesterday paid off on a $500,000 policy taken out last January by her mother, slain Main Line lawyer Stefanie Rabinowitz. Provident Mutual president Robert W. Kloss hand-delivered the hefty check to Stefanie's mother, Anne Newman, who is raising her daughter's 18-month old baby girl. "We evaluated this matter based on the usual standards and practices of Provident Mutual and the confidential information we developed led us to decide to pay the death benefits available under the policy," Kloss said in a statement.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1991 | by Jenice Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
The struggle to cope with hard times has hit many of us. In March, the jobless rate shot up to 6.8 percent, as the number of Americans joining the ranks of the unemployed since last summer swelled to 2 million. It was the sixth straight month that businesses have cut jobs, making it the worst stretch of mass layoffs since the 1981-82 recession, the Labor Department has said. The Daily News is periodically introducing you to Philadelphians who are among the hundreds of thousands of Americans who have been thrown out of work.
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