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NEWS
February 20, 2014 | By Seth Zweifler, Inquirer Staff Writer
In what looked more like a lively fitness class than a protest, a group of about 40 Pennsylvania health care advocates, unionized workers, and uninsured Philadelphians took their cause to Gov. Corbett's Center City office Tuesday. For about a half-hour around lunchtime, protesters lining South Broad Street pumped their fists, spun in circles, and passed out yellow pamphlets in trying to convince passersby that Corbett's plan to overhaul Medicaid - a key part of the Healthy Pennsylvania campaign that the governor has touted for months - is no more than a poorly disguised Trojan horse for policies they consider stingy.
NEWS
February 10, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Community health centers never put much effort into the kind of high-pressure haggling over insurance company contracts that many hospitals and large medical practices engage in. With maybe 10 percent of patients covered by commercial plans, it didn't matter. Suddenly, it does. Some of their uninsured patients are now eligible to buy subsidized commercial coverage on the marketplace set up by Obamacare. The most popular new plan in Southeastern Pennsylvania puts providers in tiers that set copays and deductibles.
BUSINESS
February 10, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Say you're a 62-year-old man who's ready, willing, and eager to take Social Security's offer of early retirement. There's just one pesky detail. Although you're well-fixed financially, you can't afford hundreds of thousands of dollars in uninsured medical bills. And your wife, a 55-year-old cancer survivor worried about a relapse, can't get insurance. At least that was so last year, when you were still "job-locked" - stuck by your family's need for insurance in a position you'd be happy to give up, perhaps to a recent college grad struggling to find work.
NEWS
February 9, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Anastasia Gelashvilli wanted to get to her taxes done when she walked into the Campaign for Working Families at 1207 Chestnut St. on Tuesday. And she left several hours later with a finished return. But the 25-year-old woman from Northeast Philadelphia also came away with an appointment with an Affordable Care Act navigator to buy health insurance. "My income isn't that high to get medical insurance," said Gelashvilli, 25, a recent Russian immigrant who works full-time in a family-owned clothing shop downtown.
NEWS
January 25, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
EGG HARBOR TWP., N.J. The daughter of local radio host and veterans advocate April Kauffman, who was killed in her Linwood home in May 2012, filed a federal lawsuit Thursday under the "slayer statute" to block her stepfather from collecting on $600,000 in life insurance. The lawsuit by Kim Pack, 31, of Linwood, against James Kauffman is based on a legal doctrine that prohibits those who have caused the death of another to benefit monetarily, said lawyer Patrick D'Arcy, who is representing Pack.
SPORTS
January 24, 2014 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
MOBILE, Ala. - Oklahoma corner Aaron Colvin crumpled at the end of a one-on-one passing drill in Tuesday afternoon's South team Senior Bowl practice. In the stands, Colvin's agent, Ken Sarnoff, immediately feared the worst. Sarnoff worked his way down to the field, where an orthopedist on hand already was manipulating Colvin's right knee. It felt loose. Quickly, Colvin was loaded into a car for transport to an MRI clinic. Sarnoff jumped into his rental car and the caravan sped off. "It's the most devastating thing I've experienced in 16 years in the business," Sarnoff said yesterday from Pensacola, Fla., where he accompanied Colvin to the clinic of famed surgeon Dr. James Andrews.
NEWS
January 23, 2014 | By Robert Calandra and Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writers
Paige Wolf has been buying health insurance from Independence Blue Cross for years. So when the self-employed public relations professional learned that she could buy a top-of-the-line platinum plan for less than her old policy, she was ecstatic. But her good fortune turned to frustration when the Center City woman didn't receive an invoice for her new plan. She went on Independence's Facebook page to vent. Then she received an e-mail scan of an overdue notice for her January bill, with her doctor's address on it, not hers.
NEWS
January 19, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
The breakdown of last week's Affordable Care Act enrollment totals showed that a significant number of consumers bought insurance in December, making up some of the ground lost after the error-plagued launch of the healthcare.gov website. The big question now is whether the ACA will carry the momentum into the new year. The law will rise or fall on whether it meets the needs of consumers, especially healthy, younger ones. A program with too few members or one overloaded with older, sicker people would lead to more expensive plans, causing the program to stall and even shrivel.
NEWS
January 17, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
THE FREE LIBRARY of Philadelphia is providing some TLC to help city residents navigate the ACA. That's the Affordable Care Act, the country's new health-insurance system, which many users nationwide have reported is difficult to navigate. "The library is here to help customers in nearly every aspect of their life," said Siobhan A. Reardon, president and director of the Free Library. "And that now includes navigating the Affordable Care Act. " To help meet that need, 33 of the Free Library's staff members were trained as certified application counselors by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.
NEWS
January 17, 2014
TWO recent economic experiments tell us a good deal about the priorities of young Americans. They want marijuana, and they're not so crazy about Obamacare. First, the pot. Colorado essentially legalized the drug Jan. 1. There are lines around the block, most outlets are already sold out, and the price has shot up to $400 an ounce. A quick look at photos of those lined up for pot tells you they're exactly the kind of people Obamacare needs. Most experts agree that Obamacare would work best if the so-called young invincibles would agree to buy insurance.
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