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BUSINESS
July 15, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a nation still struggling to insure humans against illness, insurers say fewer than two million Americans have policies for their pets - maybe 1 percent of the potential market. In England and Sweden, 25 percent or more of pet owners have policies. But marketing to veterinarians and animal drugmakers who sell expensive new therapies has boosted sales and prospects for Newtown Square-based Petplan and others in the small-but- growing ranks of U.S. pet insurers. Bosses and backers of Petplan, founded by English expats Chris and Natasha Ashton when they were Wharton students coping with high vet bills for her cat, thought it a measure of fiscal validation recently when rival Trupanion , the Seattle company that owns American Pet Insurance Co. , filed to raise $89 million in an initial public stock offering.
NEWS
July 7, 2014 | Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph C. Ladd, 87, of Bryn Mawr, a former ward of the state who rose to become a respected insurance executive and Philadelphia civic leader, died Wednesday, June 18, of prostate cancer at his home. Mr. Ladd was born in Chicago, and taken in by the Illinois Children's Home and Aid Society before being adopted by Stephen C. and Laura McBride Ladd of Elgin, Ill. The home is now a United Way agency. Because of his boyhood experience, Mr. Ladd understood the need for public service and assumed a lifelong mantle of volunteerism.
NEWS
July 1, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Luis Rodriguez knew it was the house for him and his family when he saw the rhododendron on the side, the size of a tree. He is a landscaper. His wife, Danielle, loved the size of the lot, a corner, and the five bedrooms. She was excited about all the work her husband could do! This was in Williamstown, a place to raise their family. Luis never finished high school in Camden. He worked, often seven days a week, to provide for his family. His wife worked full-time, too, first for Comcast, then for Penn Medicine scheduling appointments.
BUSINESS
June 30, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Mention the word insurance , even to people who pay attention to other consumer topics, and you're likely to draw yawns. Trust me on that - it's just the nature of the beast. After more than a dozen years of writing about everything from airfares to computer zombies, I've learned what stirs reader interest and what makes readers turn away. One reason is that you're likely to misperceive insurance as something intangible - a generic sense of protection against an awful but unlikely event.
NEWS
June 29, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Claudia Gordon spent 14 years chasing down bad boys as a Philadelphia policewoman. As a woman officer, Gordon occasionally ran into a perp who was thinking, "Whatcha gonna do?" Bad move, bad boy. "They think women are weak," said Gordon, 59, who retired in 2006. "But we're not as weak as they think. " On the street, there was no intimidating Gordon. But buying health insurance on the Affordable Care Act marketplace - well, that rattled her. Like so many others who tried to buy health insurance on healthcare.gov last fall, Gordon had to make a couple of attempts to finally get her plan, and only then with the help of a navigator.
NEWS
June 23, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - The Corbett administration on Friday announced the list of insurance companies that had met its qualifications to provide coverage to hundreds of thousands of the uninsured by early 2015. Under Gov. Corbett's proposed Medicaid expansion alternative, nine insurance companies would provide health care to as many as 600,000 low-income residents - most of them the working poor - who make too much for traditional Medicaid but whose employers provide no coverage. "The governor is incredibly pleased with the response," said Jennifer Branstetter, Corbett's secretary of policy and planning.
NEWS
June 22, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Six months into the Affordable Care Act, local mental-health and substance-abuse professionals have yet to see an uptick in clients using their new benefits. The seeming lack of interest has been disappointing for caregivers, but is not completely unexpected. "It's very early," said Patricia Kleven, director of outpatient mental health services at the Belmont Center for Comprehensive Treatment. "I don't know what it will look like in six months or a year. But at the moment, not so much.
NEWS
June 21, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Montgomery County will have to pay 18 percent more for legal-liability insurance as a result of a $1.65 million lawsuit settlement by the District Attorney's Office. District Attorney Risa Vetri Ferman agreed to the settlement in May and issued an official apology to a Radnor contractor who said her office wrongfully charged him with theft and damaged his business reputation. The charges stemmed from a 2007 contract dispute between Walter Logan and Salem Baptist Church of Jenkintown, whose members included some high-ranking county officials.
BUSINESS
June 16, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Hurricane season is starting slowly, and weather forecasters predict that El NiƱo may help spare us this year. But as Hurricane Sandy reminded our region, you never can predict when you'll be in bad luck's bull's-eye. So it's a good time to consider how to avoid another kind of harm: from a Swiss-cheese insurance policy. Some Sandy victims found, for instance, that if losses were caused by both wind and water, a term with a whale of a name - an "anti-concurrent-causation clause" - could help an insurer sidestep or lowball a claim.
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