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NEWS
June 15, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
In the 10 months that Emily Lennon has been an Affordable Care Act navigator, she has reached one solid conclusion: Most people buying health insurance don't speak the lingo. "Nobody understands health insurance," said Lennon, who works at Resources for Human Development. Lennon has found that most first-time buyers, as well as people who were once covered through work but now buy coverage on their own, don't know basic terms like premium and deductible. Start talking coinsurance, out-of-pocket maximum, pharmaceutical formulary, co-payment, in-network providers, tier plans , HMO and PPO , and people get lost in the jargon jungle.
NEWS
May 30, 2014 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
HOW DOES a mob-connected fraudster - who allegedly kept deer blood at his South Philly auto-body shop to stage fake "Hollywood" accidents - land a $1.8 million city contract to fix cop cars and other vehicles? This is Philadelphia. He knew a guy. "We are here today to announce the arrest - once again - of Ron Galati Sr. and his co-conspirators for a nearly $5 million insurance-fraud scheme," District Attorney Seth Williams said yesterday, before delving into the latest round of charges against Galati.
NEWS
May 30, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
People wandering through Ron Galati's South Philadelphia auto-body shop could be forgiven for thinking they'd stumbled upon an urban hunting lodge. There were deer heads mounted on the walls and carcasses, fur, and blood stored in the back. In reality, says Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams, the shop was an elaborate staging area for a $5 million scheme that defrauded auto insurance companies and involved a police officer and city worker. Galati - an alleged mob associate awaiting trial for paying to kill three people - was in the business, according to a grand jury, of "fictitious deer accidents.
NEWS
May 23, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
UnitedHealth Group has declared its experiment with using Comcast's video-on-demand service to deliver a weight-loss program a success. But the Minnesota health insurer has no immediate plans to continue using cable TV to coax clients to adopt healthier habits that could lead to lower health-care costs. Instead, it is selling a Web-based version of the program to employers who want to prevent expensive chronic medical problems in overweight workers. Such efforts to make weight-loss programs easily available to more consumers are becoming more popular, experts say. The goal of the program, offered to Comcast viewers in Philadelphia and Knoxville, Tenn., was for participants at risk of developing diabetes to lose 5 percent to 7 percent of their body weight.
NEWS
May 18, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
In a gritty industrial park tucked inside a middle-class Bensalem neighborhood, John F. McGeever III is living his dream. Since he was a teenager working for his father in the firm founded by his grandfather in 1929, McGeever wanted nothing more than to own the Charles Schillinger Co. His father sold the company in 1988. Seven years later, McGeever mortgaged everything and bought back the small metal-spinning and fabrication firm. "I always wanted to have the company," said McGeever, 58, a tall, lean, intense man with close-cropped white hair.
BUSINESS
May 12, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The costs of long-term care for the elderly are a wild card that can make or break retirement. "If people run out of money, it's often because of long-term care costs," Jack VanDerhei said at a pension conference this month in Philadelphia. But only a smattering of Americans have long-term care insurance, or enough of the insurance, said VanDerhei, research director at the Employee Benefit Research Institute and an expert in the financial aspects of retirement. Current forms of long-term care insurance provide a limited pool of money that can be used to pay for nursing homes and other forms of care that health insurance does not cover and that can quickly deplete retirement savings.
NEWS
May 12, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Success is good. But too much success can leave some people grumbling. Take Independence Blue Cross. The region's largest health insurer anticipated enrolling 100,000 new members in Pennsylvania and through AmeriHealth New Jersey when the Affordable Care Act marketplace opened in October. As of April 30, the company had signed up a total of 283,000 members in new plans, almost three times as many as it expected. And 89 percent of them have paid their premiums. Great news, right?
NEWS
May 4, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
David B. Phillips, 75, of Pennsauken, wasn't just a member of the Martin Luther Chapel in Pennsauken. His late parents, Ralph and Elsa, in the 1940s helped found the chapel, part of the Lutheran Church Missouri Synod. "Church was one of the important passions of his life," daughter Karen Wright said. "He was president of the congregation at one point," she said, and at other times its treasurer and Sunday school superintendent. On Tuesday, April 29, Mr. Phillips, who retired in 2001 as manager of the shareholder services department at Cigna, the health insurance services firm, died of heart disease at Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center in Camden.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
A CENTER CITY lawyer who masterminded a seven-year slip-and-fall racket that bilked insurance firms out of nearly $400,000 evaded arrest by committing suicide, District Attorney Seth Williams said yesterday. Andrew H. Gaber, 52, of Delaware County, shot himself to death last week. He was scheduled to be arrested yesterday as a result of a nearly two-year grand-jury investigation that ensnared him and dozens of others whom he lured into helping him rip off some 21 insurance companies.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sue Schick, 52, president of UnitedHealthcare Pennsylvania and Delaware, claims she was mortified last month when, in the process of honoring her with the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce's Paradigm Award, the master of ceremonies read entries from her seventh-grade yearbook. She shouldn't have been. The yearbook showed early evidence of the leadership abilities that prompted the chamber to name her 2014's top female business executive. "In the Girl Scout cookie sales, we didn't think we could surpass the previous year," Schick recalled.
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