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January 11, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Josh Blackman is a young, conservative law professor who has been getting plenty of attention for his history of the legal fight over Obamacare. Legal experts across the spectrum, including Harvard University's Lawrence Tribe and Georgetown University Law Center's Randy Barnett, a leading libertarian, have heaped praise on Blackman's book, Unprecedented: The Constitutional Challenge to Obamacare . It provides a granular account of how...
NEWS
January 10, 2014
M ASON REINER, 36, and Dr. Randy Robinson, 41, both of Elkins Park, are co-founders and CEO and chief medical officer, respectively, of R-Health. The Center City startup, launched in October, charges a monthly membership fee that enables individuals, employers, unions and small businesses to see primary-care doctors without co-pays or deductibles administered through a health insurer. I spoke with Reiner, who is a Wharton School graduate and serial entrepreneur. Q: Where did you get the money to start the business?
NEWS
January 9, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - State Sen. Vincent Hughes (D., Phila.) wants the Obama administration to reject Gov. Corbett's proposal to provide health insurance to those newly eligible for Medicaid through private insurers. In a letter to President Obama on Tuesday, Hughes writes that had Pennsylvania expanded its Medicaid rolls, as two dozen other states have, roughly 500,000 people would have had insurance coverage Jan. 1, and the state would have received $400 million in federal subsidies to pay for it. Hughes said the Corbett proposal - which requires recipients to pay premiums and engage in a work search - is "fraught with serious problems" and leaves the working poor with no options for insurance until next year.
BUSINESS
January 6, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
You may or may not think it's fair that your credit history could play a key role in setting your auto-insurance premiums - a long-running debate in insurance regulation, though a battle that insurers so far appear to have won. Only a handful of states - California, Massachusetts, and Hawaii - have limited credit scores' use in insurance pricing. If you pay bills promptly and have a top credit score, you likely benefit. But you suffer if you occasionally fall short, which is why groups such as the Consumer Federation of America contend that the practice discriminates against low- and middle-income drivers.
NEWS
January 4, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Philadelphians will have the chance Friday to comment on Gov. Corbett's controversial proposal to expand health coverage for low-income residents using federal money to pay for private insurance. Nearly 90 people are scheduled to testify at the all-day hearing at the National Constitution Center on Corbett's "HealthyPA" plan, which would let about 500,000 uninsured residents buy health insurance on the private market rather than expanding Medicaid rolls, as other states have done.
NEWS
January 4, 2014 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
BRICK, N.J. - Peggy Molloy had no damage to her house from Hurricane Sandy, but the red-haired, 56-year-old mother of two teenagers is facing a surge that could still put her under water. An impending steep hike in National Flood Insurance Program rates would increase rates on her modest Point Pleasant rancher from $800 a year to between $10,000 and $14,000, she said, unless she spends about $80,000 to elevate the house. "It has made my house worthless," she said. "My entire neighborhood is faced with this, but nobody believes it. " Molloy appeared Thursday at a news conference at which U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez (D., N.J.)
NEWS
January 3, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer and David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writers
Several area religious organizations and businesses appeared to be happier Wednesday after an order by Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor temporarily blocked a requirement that some religious-affiliated employers provide health insurance that includes birth control. Sotomayor's two-sentence order came about two hours before the policies of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act were to go into effect at 12:01 a.m. Wednesday. The order applies only to this issue, but adds to the debate about the law. She gave the Obama administration until Friday to respond to a bid by the Denver and Baltimore chapters of the Little Sisters of the Poor for an exemption from the mandate.
NEWS
December 29, 2013 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
The twice-extended deadline to enroll in subsidized health insurance and be covered from the start of the new year has finally passed. Well, sort of. Administration officials said last week they would try to arrange Jan. 1 coverage for people who have had trouble getting through the cranky website. Meanwhile, insurers are switching their focus to confirming that the people who have successfully signed up appear in company records. The problem is that the transfer of customer data from healthcare.gov to insurance companies and the quality of the information has been - you guessed it - glitchy.
NEWS
December 26, 2013 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA The attempted murder case against reputed mob associate Ronald Galati had its roots in an insurance fraud investigation of the South Philadelphia auto-body man, according to court documents. Galati, 63, is charged with ordering the killings of three men, including a rival auto-body shop owner who had testified against him in the insurance fraud case, the documents say. He also stands accused of hiring a hit man to kill the man's son. And he is charged with ordering a hit on his daughter's boyfriend, according to a 10-page affidavit filed in Common Pleas Court.
NEWS
December 25, 2013 | By Robert Calandra and Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writers
With Monday's deadline - now extended to Tuesday - to sign up for health insurance starting Jan. 1, hundreds of thousands of people flocked to the federal website and sought help from local organizations. About 850,000 people had visited the website by 2 p.m., five times more than the same time the previous Monday, on top of 1.2 million over the weekend, a federal spokeswoman said, and there were few glitches. "Yes, everybody waited until today to enroll," said a harried-sounding Laura Line, corporate assistant director for Philadelphia-based Resources for Human Development, who had to rush off the phone at 5:15 p.m. to help a new arrival get insurance.
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