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NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Until she noticed the tiny blood spots on her sheets, Peg Fagan thought the itchy, raised area on her shoulder was a spider bite. So when her doctor asked during a routine checkup in April whether Fagan had any health concerns, she mentioned the bite. The doctor took a sample to biopsy. A few days later, Fagan got a call saying she had to come in to the office. "I said, 'No, I don't,' " remembered Fagan, 56, a breast cancer survivor. "If you are going to tell me that I have cancer, just tell me. " Fagan had melanoma, the most serious kind of skin cancer.
NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
What can you expect, when your surrogate is expecting? Prospective parents may be willing to pay any price. But first, examine the sensitive financial questions behind hiring a legal, legitimate surrogate (by legal, we mean not a woman you found online). What does the process cost? Who gets paid? Can you take out a home equity loan or charge credit cards? (Yes to both). The costs of surrogacy are usually about $120,000, experts advise. But like any lifetime investment, such as college or retirement, you can pay in stages.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philip Rinaldi, the city's refinery titan, offered Philadelphia City Council a lesson in business terminology Friday when he introduced a new phrase into council's vocabulary: "idiot insurance. " During testimony on whether the city-owned Philadelphia Gas Works should engage in a public-private partnership, Rinaldi suggested Council could consider protecting its interests by maintaining an ownership stake in any private venture. "I live in a world of mergers and acquisitions," said Rinaldi, chief executive of Philadelphia Energy Solutions.
NEWS
March 14, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Raymond L. Freudberg, 92, formerly of Wyncote, a retired insurance company executive, died Wednesday, March 4, of heart failure at Beaumont at Bryn Mawr, where he had lived for 41/2 years. Born in Philadelphia to Herman and Rose Kierson Freudberg, Mr. Freudberg graduated from Olney High School in 1939 and took night courses at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1942. From 1942 to 1946 he served in Washington, in the finance division of the Air Transport Command, part of the Army Air Forces.
NEWS
March 8, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Ted Dallas knew he was walking into a crisis the late-January day he accepted the job as Pennsylvania's acting secretary of the Department of Human Services. He knew that, since early December, thousands of Pennsylvanians with alcohol and drug addictions had been locked out of treatment centers. And he understood the seriousness of their situation. "For folks in the drug and alcohol world, that continuity of care and the wraparound services and keeping it consistent is particularly important," Dallas said.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lots of companies mount ambitious programs to hire college graduates, but the Graham Co., an insurance and risk-management company, takes a different approach. "As a rule, we don't hire right out of college," said Kenneth L. Ewell, 57, Graham's president and chief operating officer. Question: Why did Graham adopt that philosophy? Answer: You just have a higher degree of success [if] they've worked someplace else, and they have a little bit of context and they have some basis to judge Graham against.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2015 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Maybe you've learned this the hard way. You get into a small accident and make an insurance claim - say, one that nets you a couple of thousand dollars after your deductible. The next thing you know, your premium jumps. In the long run, you realize, you may actually come out behind. It's a frustrating moment for many, as illustrated by a recent Liberty Mutual commercial touting "accident forgiveness" and portraying a dutiful customer "like the poster child for paying on time," as the spokes-character puts it. "And then one day you tap the bumper of a station wagon.
NEWS
February 15, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
You wouldn't buy a car without negotiating, would you? Health care is the same now. Feb. 15 is the last day to sign up for a health-insurance policy and avoid a tax penalty to Uncle Sam that could total 2 percent of your income. If you don't have coverage, today's the day. If you have insurance, there are ways to save money on your medical bills. Because, let's face it, even the new insurance isn't that affordable. Silver and bronze plans under the Affordable Care Act carry median family deductibles of roughly $2,500 and $5,100, respectively, according to data from management-consulting firm McKinsey & Co. As health-care costs shift to consumers, we need to negotiate services at fair prices.
NEWS
February 5, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gary Bromberg, 83, of Springfield, Montgomery County, a commercial insurance broker and an artist, died Saturday, Jan. 31, of multiple myeloma at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., Mr. Bromberg moved to the Wynnefield section of Philadelphia with his family when he was 5. He graduated from Overbrook High School and from Pennsylvania State University with the Class of 1953. While there, he pledged Beta Sigma Pi fraternity. Mr. Bromberg did further study at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School.
NEWS
January 27, 2015
LAST WEEK'S Commonwealth Court ruling that overturned the school district's attempt to make teachers contribute to their health insurance was called a "very big victory" by teachers union president Jerry Jordan. It certainly is a victory for the union. The state appeals court, in a unanimous opinion, rejected the district's claim that the state-takeover law gave it the right to impose terms on the union. The ruling will save union members $54 million a year in payments they would otherwise have to make toward paying for their health insurance.
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