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NEWS
September 30, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thomas E. Lynch Sr., 71, of Broomall, an insurance underwriter and volunteer for veterans' organizations, died Friday, Sept. 19, of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at Genesis HealthCare-Wayne Center in Wayne. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Lynch graduated from St. Joseph's Preparatory School. In 1965, he earned a bachelor's degree in marketing from St. Joseph's University, where he founded and was president of the Marketing Club. After graduating, he joined the Insurance Co. of North America (INA)
NEWS
September 20, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Martin R. Stenson, 71, of Springfield, Delaware County, a longtime insurance salesman and active community worker, died Sunday, Sept. 14, of Alzheimer's disease at his home. Mr. Stenson attended St. Thomas More Boys' High School in Philadelphia, where he forged many of his lifelong friendships. He graduated in 1952 and then served in the Army. In 1960, he was hired as a salesman with Liberty Mutual Insurance Co. His office was first in Bala Cynwyd and later in Springfield. He stayed with the firm for almost 40 years.
NEWS
September 15, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the 1970s and 1980s, Samuel W. Madara and his wife, Connie, traveled overseas several times to share ideas about insurance "with a broad group of insurance people," she said. They and others in their group were not simply Americans bringing their methods to other cultures, she said, but were also learning in seminars from foreign insurers. "It was an exchange of ideas peculiar in China" at the time, she said in a phone interview, because in the days before private enterprise, "they were all government workers.
NEWS
August 30, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jeffrey B. Wallner, 65, of Cherry Hill, an insurance broker who owned Walnut Street Associates in Marlton, died of cancer on Wednesday, Aug. 27, at home. Mr. Wallner graduated from Cheltenham High School in 1967 and earned a bachelor's in business at Temple University in 1971. He later completed studies to become a chartered life underwriter, with expertise in life insurance and estate planning. "He started in the insurance business right out of college," his wife, Heather, said.
NEWS
August 18, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Shirley Tax spends her days at Chinatown Medical Services fielding questions from patients who bought health insurance on the Affordable Care Act marketplace. Most of those queries revolve around Independence Blue Cross' best-selling, silver-level Keystone HMO Proactive plan. Tax says patients signed up for the tiered plan without really understanding how it worked. So when they receive a bill they take it to Tax and ask her to explain it. "Most of them didn't have insurance before," Tax, 26, says of her clients, many of whom are immigrants.
BUSINESS
August 11, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Nnamdi Asogwa's green 2010 Camry sits in his Upper Darby driveway, shiny and tagless testimony to the small nightmare he's been living. Asogwa, 33, is a Nigerian immigrant, and a U.S. citizen since 2011. He has a bachelor's degree in political science, an M.B.A., and a job as a project manager at Siemens Healthcare in Malvern. He also has a story that illustrates, at the very least, the risks of running even slightly afoul of the rules followed by the police, auto insurers, and the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Rachel Zamzow, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tony Burke was an energetic 2-year-old who loved drawing purple pictures of Barney and jumping on trampolines. But then his parents began to notice how he would grunt instead of talk, and couldn't look anyone in the eye. Before his third birthday, in 2005, he was diagnosed with autism. "It felt like my heart had been ripped out," said his mother, Suzanne Burke of Philadelphia. Seeking the best care, his parents found applied behavior analysis (ABA), a one-on-one therapy considered the most effective treatment to date for autism.
NEWS
August 4, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
William D. Widerman was a starting pitcher for the Duke University baseball team and a member of the V-12 Navy College Training Program intended to produce officers during World War II. There came a time when his North Carolina college team played an exhibition game against a military team, starring no less than the Red Sox leftfielder Ted Williams, who had led the American League in homers in 1941 and 1942. The reason that the major-league star was playing against a college team, likely in 1943, is lost to Widerman family memory, but a Marines website reports that some of Williams' training to become a Marine Corps pilot took place at Chapel Hill, N.C. The Splendid Splinter made the day memorable.
NEWS
August 4, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Seven months after coverage began for people who bought health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, more are now insured and most of the nearly 10 million people who have signed up say they are satisfied with their plans. Yet now a new set of challenges looms. Will the plans be affordable, and will users know how to use tiered networks and other innovations without incurring huge bills? "The law has pretty much met the early benchmarks, but if it stopped here, I don't think anyone would declare it a success," says Larry Levitt, senior vice president for special initiatives at the Kaiser Family Foundation, which is tracking the law. The law offers new insurance options for the individual market.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a nation still struggling to insure humans against illness, insurers say fewer than two million Americans have policies for their pets - maybe 1 percent of the potential market. In England and Sweden, 25 percent or more of pet owners have policies. But marketing to veterinarians and animal drugmakers who sell expensive new therapies has boosted sales and prospects for Newtown Square-based Petplan and others in the small-but- growing ranks of U.S. pet insurers. Bosses and backers of Petplan, founded by English expats Chris and Natasha Ashton when they were Wharton students coping with high vet bills for her cat, thought it a measure of fiscal validation recently when rival Trupanion , the Seattle company that owns American Pet Insurance Co. , filed to raise $89 million in an initial public stock offering.
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