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Insurgency

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NEWS
May 23, 2005 | By Steve Chapman
'We feel right now that we have, as I mentioned, broken the back of the insurgency.' - Marine Lt. Gen. John Sattler, Nov. 18, 2004, after the U.S.-led offensive against Fallujah Could it be that we've misclassified the insurgency in Iraq - that it's an invertebrate, able to absorb bone-crushing blows because it has no bones to crush? It seems to be more like a dandelion, which, when smashed, only spreads more seeds. Seven months after U.S. forces leveled the enemy stronghold, the insurgents are causing as much trouble as ever.
NEWS
December 15, 2003 | By Joseph L. Galloway INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The capture of Saddam Hussein does not mean an end to the insurgency aimed at derailing the transition to a free Iraq. Hussein was not running that war - he was running for his life. The groups that violently oppose the U.S. presence in Iraq are as diverse as the country itself. Hussein was not their spiritual symbol, as Ho Chi Minh was for the Vietnamese, much less their military leader, as was North Vietnam's Gen. Vo Nguyen Giap. Among the Iraqi insurgents, there is no single unifying ideology or religious tenet.
NEWS
February 22, 2013 | By Kathy Gannon, Associated Press
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - At least half the Afghan Taliban fighters recently freed from Pakistani prisons have rejoined the insurgency, a Pakistani intelligence official says, throwing into question the value of such goodwill gestures that the Afghan government requested to restart a flagging peace process. A senior Western official who spoke on condition of anonymity so he could talk freely confirmed that "some" newly freed Taliban fighters have returned to the battlefield. The development underscores the difficulties in reaching a political deal with the Taliban before the end of 2014, when NATO and U.S. troops are scheduled to have completed their withdrawal from Afghanistan.
NEWS
June 13, 2005 | By Tom Lasseter INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
A growing number of senior American military officers in Iraq have concluded there is no long-term military solution to an insurgency that has killed thousands of Iraqis and more than 1,300 U.S. troops in the last two years. Instead, officers say, the only way to end the guerrilla war is through Iraqi politics - an arena that has been crippled by divisions between Shiite Muslims, whose coalition dominated January elections, and Sunni Muslims, who are a minority in Iraq and form the base of support for the insurgency.
NEWS
October 2, 2005 | By Tom Lasseter INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Sgt. Antonio Molina sat on a rooftop in the pitch of night, scanning the road before him with a high-powered sniper scope, hoping an insurgent would scramble out of a car to lay a bomb and give him a reason to squeeze the trigger. He and three other Third Infantry Division snipers were dropped off last week at a house on the outskirts of Muqdadiyah, in an Iraqi province that military officials frequently say is largely pacified. Dozens of infantry soldiers stormed the abandoned structure in a staged raid and left the four men behind.
NEWS
March 1, 2006 | By Warren P. Strobel and Jonathan S. Landay INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
U.S. intelligence agencies repeatedly warned the White House beginning more than two years ago that the insurgency in Iraq had deep local roots, was likely to worsen, and could lead to civil war, according to former senior intelligence officials who helped craft the reports. Among the warnings, the Inquirer Washington Bureau has learned, was a National Intelligence Estimate completed in October 2003 that concluded that the insurgency was fueled by local conditions - not foreign terrorists - and drew strength from deep grievances, including one against the presence of U.S. troops.
NEWS
September 15, 2004 | By Jonathan S. Landay and Warren P. Strobel INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The U.S. strategy to create a stable, democratic Iraq is in danger of failing, some current and former American analysts say, and the anti-American insurgency is growing larger, more sophisticated and more violent. A wave of attacks across Iraq included the deadliest single bombing in Baghdad in six months yesterday and at least seven bombings in the capital Sunday. The violence increasingly appears to threaten nationwide elections planned for January, which are key to President Bush's hopes for reducing the number of U.S. troops, now 140,000, and making a graceful exit from Iraq.
NEWS
April 30, 2004 | By William Douglas, James Kuhnhenn and Sumana Chatterjee INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
As the U.S. death toll in Iraq rose and the insurgency remained strong, the Bush administration faced increased skepticism yesterday on Capitol Hill and among military experts about the viability and wisdom of its Iraq policy. Lawmakers from both parties have become uneasy about President Bush's plans to hand over limited sovereignty to a still-unidentified Iraqi government June 30. Also troubling them is that the U.S. military appears unable to quell the Iraqi insurrection; 10 more U.S. soldiers were killed yesterday.
NEWS
June 27, 2005 | By Leila Fadel and Kevin G. Hall INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said yesterday that it could take as long as 12 years to defeat the insurgency in Iraq, but he said it would be up to Iraqi forces to do the job. "We're not going to win against the insurgency. The Iraqi people are going to win against the insurgency," Rumsfeld told Fox News Sunday. "That insurgency could go on for any number of years. Insurgencies tend to go on five, six, eight, 10, 12 years. " He said Iraq's security forces will have to finish the job because American and other foreign troops will have left the country by then.
NEWS
January 20, 1986
William F. Buckley (Op-ed Page, Jan. 7, "What if Marcos wins the election?") asked the Filipino people a question: "If you were a Filipino, feeling the hot breath of a communist insurgency, and given the choice of (Ferdinand) Marcos or (Corazon) Aquino, are you absolutely certain you would vote for Aquino?" Mr. Buckley answered that he was certainly not; but Mr. Buckley is also certainly not a Filipino either. As a Filipino myself (now studying at St. Joseph's University) I consider it evident that the "hot breath of a communist insurgency" can no longer be contained by the ailing President Marcos or by his over-staying generals.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
IN TODAY'S movie universe, a teenage girl with a gun crushes Sean Penn with a gun. In fact, a teenage girl doing practically anything crushes Sean Penn with a gun. Star Shailene Woodley and the second installment in the "Divergent" series, "Insurgent," easily topped the box office with $54 million, according to Rentrak estimates yesterday. Penn's "The Gunman" stumbled with only $5 million. According to "Insurgent" distributor Lionsgate, 60 percent of its audiences were female.
NEWS
July 24, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
BAGHDAD - Iraqi security forces locked down areas around the infamous Abu Ghraib prison and another high-security detention facility on Baghdad's outskirts yesterday to hunt for escaped inmates and militants after daring insurgent assaults set hundreds of detainees free. The carefully orchestrated late-night attacks killed dozens Sunday, including at least 25 members of the Iraqi security forces. Insurgents fired dozens of mortar shells and detonated suicide and car bombs, drawing Iraqi forces into firefights that lasted more than an hour.
NEWS
June 10, 2013 | By Patrick Quinn and Rahim Faiez
ASSOCIATED PRESS KABUL, Afghanistan - At least five heavily armed insurgents were engaged in an hours-long gun battle with security forces on the perimeter of Afghanistan's main airport Monday after they tried to attack NATO's airport headquarters with rocket-propelled grenades, assault rifles, and at least one large bomb, the army and police said. The airport was closed to civilian air traffic because of the attack, an airport official said. It was unclear whether the attack had damaged facilities inside the airport itself.
NEWS
May 26, 2013 | Sayed Salahuddin, Washington Post
KABUL - A blast during Friday-night prayers in a mosque in central Afghanistan killed 12 people, eight of them Taliban insurgents, officials said Saturday. The insurgents placed explosives in a corner of the mosque, in Ghazni province's Andar district, before joining worshipers, according to Qasim Deswal, a local official. They had been passing the village, carrying the explosives they routinely use for roadside-bomb and suicide attacks against Afghan and NATO targets when they stopped at the mosque, Deswal said.
NEWS
March 28, 2013 | By Ernesto Londono, Washington Post
BAGHDAD - Syria's civil war is increasingly threatening to destabilize neighboring Iraq, widening a sectarian divide in a nation still reeling from the messy aftermath of the U.S. invasion a decade ago. Iraqi officials have expressed alarm in recent weeks as fighting between troops loyal to President Bashar al-Assad and the armed opposition has spilled across the border. After staying on the sidelines for more than a year, Sunni tribes in Iraq that straddle the frontier have decisively joined the effort to topple the Alwawite Shiite-led government in Damascus.
NEWS
March 11, 2013 | By Ernesto Londoño and Kevin Sieff, Washington Post
KABUL, Afghanistan - Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel got a stark taste of the challenges that continue to bedevil Afghanistan, as insurgents carried out two deadly bombings Saturday, one within earshot of the Pentagon chief. The Afghan government, meanwhile, abruptly canceled a ceremony scheduled for Saturday that had been meant to show that Kabul and Washington had finally reached a deal for the handover of a U.S. military prison. Afghan President Hamid Karzai at the last minute balked at the proposed terms of the handover of the Parwan Detention Facility, Afghan and U.S. officials said, dashing hopes that a resolution of a contentious issue that has poisoned the relationship between the two countries was in sight.
NEWS
February 22, 2013 | By Kathy Gannon, Associated Press
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - At least half the Afghan Taliban fighters recently freed from Pakistani prisons have rejoined the insurgency, a Pakistani intelligence official says, throwing into question the value of such goodwill gestures that the Afghan government requested to restart a flagging peace process. A senior Western official who spoke on condition of anonymity so he could talk freely confirmed that "some" newly freed Taliban fighters have returned to the battlefield. The development underscores the difficulties in reaching a political deal with the Taliban before the end of 2014, when NATO and U.S. troops are scheduled to have completed their withdrawal from Afghanistan.
NEWS
February 10, 2013 | By Jamey Keaten, Associated Press
PARIS - Mud, money, and more security: The U.N.'s cultural agency said Friday that not much more is needed to help rebuild 11 mausoleums that Islamic extremists "totally devastated" in the fabled Malian city of Timbuktu. UNESCO Director-General Irina Bokova said she plans to send experts to Mali to assess the full extent of the damage left by al-Qaeda-linked Islamists who ran Timbuktu and the rest of northeastern Mali for months before being chased out by French-led troops. "We have to make an assessment about what the real situation is," said Bokova, who accompanied French President Francois Hollande to Timbuktu on Feb. 2. Of the mausoleums, "there are 11 that are totally devastated," she said.
NEWS
January 23, 2013 | By Adam Schreck, Associated Press
BAGHDAD - A string of attacks, including three car bombings in and around Baghdad, killed at least 22 people Tuesday, deepening fears of a surge in violence as sectarian tensions fester in Iraq. Although there was no immediate claim of responsibility, blame is likely to fall on Sunni insurgents such as al-Qaeda's local franchise for Tuesday's bloodshed. The group often uses indiscriminate attacks to sow fear among Iraq's Shiite majority and undermine the government's authority. It was at least the fourth day this year that insurgents overcame security measures to carry out high-profile attacks claiming at least 20 lives.
NEWS
November 21, 2012 | By Baba Ahmed, Associated Press
BAMAKO, Mali - Islamist extremist rebels say they have pushed secular Tuareg rebel fighters from Menaka, their last base in northern Mali. Oumar Ould Hamaha, spokesman of the Islamists of MUJAO, said the Tuaregs were forced to retreat from Menaka on Tuesday after heavy fighting. He said Menaka was under the Islamists' control. "I do not have an accurate record of the dead, but more than 100 fighters were killed," said Hamaha. He said the Islamists were hunting for Mohamed Najim, the Tuareg military leader.
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