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BUSINESS
December 17, 1991 | By Valerie Reitman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Unisys Corp. yesterday said it had forged a stronger alliance with chip- maker Intel Corp. in which the two companies would start collaborating on Intel's X86 microprocessors, which serve as the brains of IBM and IBM-clone personal computers. As part of the agreement, Unisys said it would standardize its desktop computers around Intel's X86 processors. The new alliance takes Unisys' relationship with Intel a step further. In the past, Unisys has primarily purchased Intel chips for use in its personal computer line; a few of its personal computers use Motorola chips.
BUSINESS
May 5, 2011 | By Jordan Robertson, Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO - Intel Corp. said Wednesday it had redesigned the electronic switches on its chips so that computers could keep getting cheaper and more powerful. The switches, known as transistors, have typically been flat. By adding a third dimension - "fins" that jut up from the base - Intel said it would be able to make the transistors and chips smaller. The concept is similar to how skyscrapers address the need for more office space when land is scarce. The Santa Clara, Calif., company said the new structure would let chips run on less power.
BUSINESS
April 20, 1993 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Intel Corp.'s stock plunged yesterday after rival Advanced Micro Devices was granted a retrial in a semiconductor-copyright suit and vowed to begin selling a clone of Intel's most powerful, and profitable, chip. The news sent tremors through Intel's investors, who fear the company's stranglehold on the lucrative market for personal-computer microprocessors may be loosening. Intel, the world's largest chip-maker, has about a 70 percent market share of the $5.2 billion market for microprocessors, the brains of computers.
NEWS
September 30, 1997 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Intel, the mighty corporation that makes microprocessors (a/k/a/ computer chips), has launched a huge TV advertising campaign. You may have seen the ads - which are for Intel's new Pentium II chip - on last week's "Seinfeld," "ER" and the new "Veronica's Closet. " Some ran a week earlier on cable's CNN, A&E and the History Channel. Intel is not your usual Seinfeld advertiser. And this is not the usual Intel ad campaign. This is an ad campaign aimed at folks who are likely to buy a new computer to use at home.
NEWS
December 25, 1994
So it came to pass, in those pressurized days before Christmas, that New Age technology came face to face with the ghost of old marketing verities. Probably, it was destined to, though who at Intel Corp. could read the writing on the screen? Too many years blinded by chips and bytes, maybe. Who knew that the cutting edge could cut both ways? But you get on the tiger, you ride the tiger. When Intel didn't 'fess up about the flaw in its Pentium chip - part of the guts of a computer - a user posted a warning note on the computing age's version of Paul Revere, the almighty Internet.
BUSINESS
November 19, 1996 | By Dan Stets, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The personal computer and television industries are locked in "a war for eyeballs" of consumers, and the outcome will determine how rapidly computer technology advances, Intel Corp. chief executive Andrew S. Grove said yesterday. In the keynote address of the computer industry's largest annual trade show, Grove projected where computer technology will be in 2011, but made it clear that the technology goals can be reached only if consumers provide enough demand for products to finance the advances.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1997 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
SAP America Inc., the business-software company in Wayne, has joined with computer-chip giant Intel Corp. to market a new system allowing merchants to make sales over the World Wide Web. The system, called Pandesic, lets a consumer purchase goods or services online while simultaneously coordinating the sale between the merchant's suppliers, warehouses and shippers. It is so automated that it even prints shipping labels and e-mails an invoice to the customer at the time an order is placed, according to officials of the two companies who demonstrated the Pandesic system at a news briefing yesterday in San Francisco.
BUSINESS
January 14, 1998 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Intel Corp. said its profits fell 9 percent in the fourth quarter, as price competition with rival makers of microprocessors took a toll. But the results easily beat Wall Street expectations amid stronger-than-expected sales of Intel's latest Pentium chips and an unexpectedly lower rate on corporate taxes. The world's largest maker of computer chips said it earned $1.74 billion, or 98 cents per share, in the three months ended Dec. 27. That was down from $1.91 billion, or $1.06 per share, in the year-ago quarter.
BUSINESS
February 17, 1995 | By Dan Stets, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Intel Corp. yesterday unveiled its newest line of computer chips, which the company says will be two to three times more powerful than its current high- end Pentium processors. The new chip, called the P6, is expected to be available in some desktop computers and computer servers by the end of this year. "I view this as a first step into virtual reality," Randy L. Steck, development manager for the P6, said in an interview yesterday. The P6 will push multimedia computers far beyond their current level, he said.
BUSINESS
January 27, 2000 | By Leslie J. Nicholson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With the possible exception of Bill Gates himself, nobody is looking forward to the release of Microsoft's Windows 2000 operating system more than Unisys Corp. The sturdy mainframe computers that put the Blue Bell company on the map are gradually giving way to servers, central computers designed to distribute information to networks, such as those that make up the Internet. Not to be left behind, Unisys says it has come out with a Windows machine with the processing muscle once available only on mainframes.
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BUSINESS
January 16, 2015 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Imagine a world where you don't have to plug in your smartphone, tablet, or laptop, or even lay it on one of the Duracell charging mats that Starbucks is rolling out nationwide. Instead, your refrigerator sends them power from across the room via a WiFi-like radio signal. Now, forget that for a while - though it might happen someday. Energous Corp., a Silicon Valley start-up, won awards last week in Las Vegas at the International Consumer Electronics Show for its WattUp system of "wire-free charging of multiple devices at up to 15 feet.
NEWS
January 9, 2015 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
LAS VEGAS - Televisions are getting larger, sharper, and more stunning. Internet devices are getting thinner, lighter, and more offbeat. Everything - from your car to your home to your tea kettle, toothbrush, or belt - is getting smarter and more connected. And 50 years after Intel cofounder Gordon Moore boldly predicted that the power of electronic circuits would continue to grow at exponential rates, innovators from across the globe are still imagining new ways to use them. International CES is no longer the "Consumer Electronics Show," and not just because of its worldwide reach.
BUSINESS
June 29, 2013 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Intel Corp., the computer-chip giant, will enter a crowded field of companies offering alternatives to Comcast Corp. and traditional pay-TV services. This year, the Santa Clara, Calif., company plans to sell a set-top box that streams content from the Internet onto a TV. Intel's self-install set-top box will come with a bundle of live local TV, ad-supported cable channels, and premium cable. There will be no need for professional installers, an Intel spokesman said. The company will market the box and service under a new brand yet to be disclosed.
NEWS
March 13, 2013 | By Lara Jakes and Donna Cassata, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - An erratic North Korea, with its nuclear weapons and increasingly belligerent tone, poses a serious threat to the United States and East Asia nations, the director of National Intelligence warned Tuesday in the annual accounting of threats worldwide. In his extensive overview, James R. Clapper told Congress that a less decentralized terrorist network had significantly altered the threats, while the Arab Spring uprising had created spikes in the dangers facing U.S. interests in the Middle East and North Africa.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2013 | By Matthew Craft, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Better earnings from General Electric and Morgan Stanley helped the stock market inch higher Friday, as major indexes closed out their third straight week of gains. GE led the 30 stocks in the Dow Jones industrial average after the conglomerate reported stronger quarterly earnings, thanks to orders from Brazil, Angola and other developing countries. Profits increased at all seven of its industrial segments, including oil and gas, energy management, aviation and transportation.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2013
CAN WE BE frank? Numerous media organizations taking the pulse of the giant CES consumer electronics show put out "Best of CES" lists. But with 3,300 exhibitors unveiling something like 20,000 new products, who can claim to have judged them all? And this year, it became painfully clear the choices can be manipulated. Popular tech website CNET was forced to disqualify the innovative, second-generation DISH Hopper satellite receiver/DVR from its "best of" awards. CBS, a sister operation of CNET parent company Viacom, is suing DISH over Hopper's automatic commercial skip feature.
BUSINESS
June 20, 2012 | By Bob Fernandez and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Panning the patent gold rush, King of Prussia wireless-technology developer Interdigital Inc. has sold 1,700 patents and patent applications to microprocessor giant Intel Corp. for $375 million cash. The patents and applications account for about 8 percent of Interdigital's portfolio, and the company expects to replenish the sold patents in about 18 months through new development at engineering labs in King of Prussia, Montreal, San Diego, and Melville, N.Y. The 1,700 patents and patent applications were related to 3G and LTE technology.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2012 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
In technology, Intel is the ultimate inside player - so much so that it built an entire marketing campaign, "Intel Inside," around partnerships with companies that power their products with Intel microprocessors. But on Wednesday - a day after Apple's announcement that it made a stunning $13 billion in profits in the last three months of 2011 - the California chipmaker was once again out front, in the spotlight thanks to a visit by President Obama a day after his State of the Union address.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2012 | By Rita Nazareth, Bloomberg News
Most U.S. stocks rose, erasing a loss for the Standard & Poor's 500 Index in the final minutes of trading Friday, as banks gained and results from International Business Machines Corp. to Intel Corp. boosted technology shares. JPMorgan Chase & Co. and Bank of America Corp. added at least 1.1 percent. IBM, Intel, and Microsoft Corp. rose more than 2.9 percent as results beat projections. General Electric Co. closed unchanged, rebounding from a 2.5 percent slump, as profit topped estimates; sales were curbed by Europe.
BUSINESS
May 5, 2011 | By Jordan Robertson, Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO - Intel Corp. said Wednesday it had redesigned the electronic switches on its chips so that computers could keep getting cheaper and more powerful. The switches, known as transistors, have typically been flat. By adding a third dimension - "fins" that jut up from the base - Intel said it would be able to make the transistors and chips smaller. The concept is similar to how skyscrapers address the need for more office space when land is scarce. The Santa Clara, Calif., company said the new structure would let chips run on less power.
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