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Intellectual Property

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NEWS
September 1, 2012
The University of Pennsylvania and Agios Pharmaceuticals on Friday announced a licensing agreement to develop products that can diagnose cancer by detecting the metabolism of cancer cells. The agreement resolves two lawsuits that Penn, its trustees, and its Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute brought in December against Craig B. Thompson, a cancer metabolism researcher who left Penn in 2011 to head Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Thompson held key positions at Penn, including director of the Abramson Cancer Center.
NEWS
December 22, 2012 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Terry L. Musika, 64, a native of Coatesville and an expert on intellectual property damages who qualified for the 1972 Olympic Games in Munich as a sprinter, died of pancreatic cancer Tuesday, Dec. 18, at his home in Hunt Valley, Md. Mr. Musika was a cofounder of Invotex, a Maryland company that specializes in accounting, financial consulting, and intellectual property management services. Mr. Musika was involved in some of the largest patent verdicts and settlements in the country.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2008 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In an expansion move, the Center City law firm of Ballard Spahr Andrews & Ingersoll L.L.P. is set to announce its acquisition of an Atlanta-based intellectual property and patent firm. Ballard partners, voting in Center City and from offices around the country, approved the merger with Needle & Rosenberg unanimously last week. The acquisition of the 27-lawyer firm will bring the number of lawyers at Ballard Spahr to around 550 at 12 offices nationwide, including the new office in Atlanta.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1996 | By Julie Stoiber, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sun Co. Inc. has struck an unusual cost-saving arrangement with a Center City law firm. The Philadelphia oil refiner and marketer has transferred all of its patent and trademark work - and two of its lawyers - to the firm of Dechert Price & Rhoads. As a result, Sun is spending about a third less on intellectual property matters, according to Jonathan C. Waller, Sun's assistant general counsel. The alliance was struck last summer, in the midst of Sun's corporate reorganization, but Waller said it was conceived even before the oil company announced the wave of layoffs and cost-cutting measures.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania's cancer research institute is suing its former scientific director and a biotechnology company he founded for more than $1 billion, accusing him of stealing intellectual property and trying to profit from it. Craig B. Thompson, who joined Penn in 1999 as scientific director of the Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, led pioneering studies of the metabolism of cancer cells, according to the lawsuit filed...
NEWS
May 10, 1994 | by Gregory Stanko and Nisha Mody, New York Times
All but lost in the rancorous debate over most-favored-nation trade status for China is an issue that is draining American writers, musicians and software designers of hundreds of millions of dollars a year: Chinese piracy of U.S. intellectual property. The Clinton administration should be punishing the Chinese for their theft of American compact discs and computer software. Instead, it has put off a decision on the issue until June 30. One of the strongest countermeasures available may be weakened by legislation to implement the Uruguay Round of negotiations on a world trade treaty.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2012 | Chris Mondics
A new firm, Royer Cooper Cohen Braunfeld L.L.C., announced that it would officially begin representing clients June 1 and would be based in Conshohocken. The firm will be led by founders John E. Royer Jr., Neil A. Cooper, Barry L. Cohen, and Roger Braunfeld. The name partners focus on transactional law, business and corporate law, intellectual property, emerging growth companies and other matters. The firm will start with a total complement of nine lawyers. — Chris Mondics
NEWS
December 25, 2012 | By Rich Lord, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
PITTSBURGH - A federal jury is to resume deliberations Wednesday on whether a California company violated a Carnegie Mellon University patent, with the stakes potentially in the billions of dollars. After four weeks of trial, U.S. District Judge Nora Barry Fischer on Friday dismissed a motion for mistrial by Marvell Technology Group. It could be revisited after the jury renders a verdict. Jurors began deliberating early Friday. In 1996, Alek Kavcic and Jose Moura of Carnegie Mellon conceived of an improvement in magnetic recording technology, using a device called a Viterbi detector to combat extraneous "noise," according to court filings in the case.
NEWS
March 3, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thirty-nine candidates will vie for three open alumni seats on Pennsylvania State University's 32-member board of trustees, the university announced this week. That's a crowded field, but not as crowded as last year, when more than 80 candidates competed for three seats in the aftermath of the child sex-abuse scandal involving former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky. This week, ballot positions for the election were determined through a drawing. Penn State alumni will be able to obtain ballots for the election online beginning April 10, Paula R. Ammerman, associate secretary of the board, said in a statement.
NEWS
February 1, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Competition for three open alumni seats on Penn State's board of trustees is heating up, with six candidates getting an initial nod from an alumni group that formed in the aftermath of the child sex-abuse scandal. A local business owner and chemist are among the six, who were selected from a pool of 50 candidates and now will be voted on by the 4,500-member Penn Staters for Responsible Stewardship. Voting will be open until Feb. 8 when the group will announce its three top picks for the trustees.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 20, 2014 | By Chris Brennan
DISTRICT ATTORNEY Seth Williams , due in federal court yesterday to defend himself in a lawsuit over the alleged theft of intellectual property, decided to settle the case instead. For a Twitter feud, this got pretty ugly. Photographer R. Bradley Maule , of PhillySkyline.com, complained in the July 2013 lawsuit that a photo used as background for Williams' official Twitter account was pilfered from his website. Williams, in a Dec. 30 deposition, said that Maule's attorney, J. Conor Corcoran , asked him about the photo during a 2013 primary Election Day lunch at the Famous 4th Street Deli.
NEWS
March 3, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thirty-nine candidates will vie for three open alumni seats on Pennsylvania State University's 32-member board of trustees, the university announced this week. That's a crowded field, but not as crowded as last year, when more than 80 candidates competed for three seats in the aftermath of the child sex-abuse scandal involving former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky. This week, ballot positions for the election were determined through a drawing. Penn State alumni will be able to obtain ballots for the election online beginning April 10, Paula R. Ammerman, associate secretary of the board, said in a statement.
NEWS
December 25, 2012 | By Rich Lord, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
PITTSBURGH - A federal jury is to resume deliberations Wednesday on whether a California company violated a Carnegie Mellon University patent, with the stakes potentially in the billions of dollars. After four weeks of trial, U.S. District Judge Nora Barry Fischer on Friday dismissed a motion for mistrial by Marvell Technology Group. It could be revisited after the jury renders a verdict. Jurors began deliberating early Friday. In 1996, Alek Kavcic and Jose Moura of Carnegie Mellon conceived of an improvement in magnetic recording technology, using a device called a Viterbi detector to combat extraneous "noise," according to court filings in the case.
NEWS
December 22, 2012 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Terry L. Musika, 64, a native of Coatesville and an expert on intellectual property damages who qualified for the 1972 Olympic Games in Munich as a sprinter, died of pancreatic cancer Tuesday, Dec. 18, at his home in Hunt Valley, Md. Mr. Musika was a cofounder of Invotex, a Maryland company that specializes in accounting, financial consulting, and intellectual property management services. Mr. Musika was involved in some of the largest patent verdicts and settlements in the country.
NEWS
September 1, 2012
The University of Pennsylvania and Agios Pharmaceuticals on Friday announced a licensing agreement to develop products that can diagnose cancer by detecting the metabolism of cancer cells. The agreement resolves two lawsuits that Penn, its trustees, and its Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute brought in December against Craig B. Thompson, a cancer metabolism researcher who left Penn in 2011 to head Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Thompson held key positions at Penn, including director of the Abramson Cancer Center.
BUSINESS
August 30, 2012
IN THE REGION Last Sunoco meeting a long trek Sunoco Inc. , the oil company whose headquarters have been located in Philadelphia for more than a century, will hold its final shareholders meeting on Oct. 4 in . . . Michigan. In a proxy statement mailed to shareholders on Wednesday, Sunoco has scheduled a meeting at the Detroit Athletic Club to vote on its proposed acquisition by Energy Transfer Partners L.P. , a pipeline company based in Dallas. After the $5.3 billion merger, Sunoco's retail business and its pipeline business will remain headquartered in the Philadelphia area, reporting to ETP's head office in Texas.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2012 | Chris Mondics
A new firm, Royer Cooper Cohen Braunfeld L.L.C., announced that it would officially begin representing clients June 1 and would be based in Conshohocken. The firm will be led by founders John E. Royer Jr., Neil A. Cooper, Barry L. Cohen, and Roger Braunfeld. The name partners focus on transactional law, business and corporate law, intellectual property, emerging growth companies and other matters. The firm will start with a total complement of nine lawyers. — Chris Mondics
NEWS
May 15, 2012 | By Richard M. Daley and Bruce Katz
Perhaps the only silver lining to the Great Recession is that it brought a new focus on manufacturing in the United States. After 25 years of being sold a shiny vision of a service-dominated postindustrial economy, we are rediscovering the importance of actually making things. Corporate cost calculations undergird the newfound appreciation of U.S. manufacturing. The offshoring of manufacturing was rooted in rock-bottom wages in nations such as China and the aggressive attraction and infrastructure strategies of foreign governments.
NEWS
February 2, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Competition for three open alumni seats on Penn State's board of trustees is heating up, with six candidates getting an initial nod from an alumni group that formed in the aftermath of the child sex-abuse scandal. A local business owner and chemist are among the six, who were selected from a pool of 50 candidates and now will be voted on by the 4,500-member Penn Staters for Responsible Stewardship. Voting will be open until Feb. 8 when the group will announce its three top picks for the trustees.
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