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Interests

SPORTS
April 18, 2002 | By Ira Josephs INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Extra equipment doesn't exist in volleyball. Only the ball flies, and occasionally the players. So before they can serve, set or spike, Council Rock seniors Justin Segura and Kevin Zwick make sure their hands are free. For Segura, that means leaving his precious guitar. For Zwick, that means letting go of his ubiquitous lacrosse stick. Although they're heavily involved in other sports and activities, the outside hitters and Council Rock captains remain contributors on the court.
NEWS
April 7, 2000
The best interests of the child. " That's what everybody involved in the Elian Gonzalez case says they want. Most claim to know what that is, despite the army of psychologists who have been recruited. Elian's Cuban father, who traveled to the United States yesterday, says his best interests are to go back to Cuba. Elian's Miami family wants a bunch of shrinks to testify about where Elian will be happiest (presumably, not in any country run by Fidel Castro). A variety of politicians suggest that Elian needs permanent resident status - so his father can be free to say he really wants to live here.
SPORTS
July 21, 1989 | By Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
Former Phillies manager Lee Elia said yesterday he would be interested in becoming the Phillies' new director of player development, and would be willing to move back to Philadelphia if necessary. "It would interest me," said Elia, currently a coach for the Yankees. "I've spent 20 years with the Phillies organization. That's been my life. I'm flattered to be considered. I have a good rapport with (general manager) Lee Thomas. I'd love to talk to him. But, until I do and find out the job description and get permission from the Yankees, I really can't say anything.
NEWS
January 1, 2001 | By Ken Dilanian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In October, at the urging of local car dealers, the state legislature passed House Bill 2200, which made it illegal in Pennsylvania for automakers to sell vehicles directly to consumers through the Internet. The Commonwealth Foundation, a conservative Harrisburg think tank, lambasted the bill as special-interest protection for "old-style, haggle-till-you-drop car dealers who fear competition. " Not so, said one of the bill's sponsors, Rep. William "Bud" George, a Clearfield County Democrat.
NEWS
January 31, 1998 | By Elsa C. Arnett, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The nation's top economic and defense leaders told Congress yesterday that American interests will be imperiled if Congress fails to approve $18 billion to replenish the reserves of the International Monetary Fund so it can aid beleaguered Asian nations. But their arguments met a cool reception, and the Clinton administration clearly faces a major lobbying challenge if it hopes to win congressional approval of the aid. Defense Secretary William S. Cohen, Treasury Secretary Robert E. Rubin and Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan urged members of the House Banking Committee to boost funding for the IMF so it can help stabilize economies in South Korea, Thailand and Indonesia.
BUSINESS
February 7, 2003 | By Don Steinberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Angry members of Philadelphia's $3 billion-a-year hospitality industry added their voices to the shouting at the Convention Center yesterday, demanding to meet with elected officials and threatening to sue if their time line is not met. Leaders of three groups representing 56,000 tourism, hotel, restaurant and related workers spoke in a sidewalk rally on Market Street, complaining that the center's board Monday elected two leaders who lack hospitality...
NEWS
September 17, 1997 | By Robert A. Rankin and David Hess, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Brushing aside complaints from liberal Democrats and labor unions, President Clinton sided with Republicans and big business yesterday in asking Congress to approve legislation giving him authority to negotiate new trade deals. In a draft bill he sent Congress, Clinton did not include terms committing him to protect labor and environmental interests as part of any trade deal he negotiates. Instead, he pledged to fight for those interests separately, either in side agreements to trade treaties or through petitions to the World Trade Organization.
NEWS
November 3, 2000 | By Ken Dilanian, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Even for a bare-knuckle Northeast Philadelphia state Senate election, the mail piece is pretty rough. "We all have that 'uncle' who slipped us beer," reads the headline over a picture of a teenager clutching a beverage can. "Too bad Uncle Hank is your state senator. " The mailer continues: "Hank Salvatore sponsored legislation easing penalties for those selling beer to our kids. Why would he do that? Because he's in the beer business. " In the Fifth Senatorial District race, Democratic challenger Mike Stack is attacking Republican incumbent Frank A. "Hank" Salvatore as never before about the intersection between Salvatore's family beer distributorship and his legislative activities.
NEWS
February 20, 2016
By Robert Maranto The key to understanding why Bernie Sanders has peaked in Iowa and New Hampshire - and will ultimately fall short - lies in an obscure, half-century-old scholarly work by an Israeli American political scientist with a Philadelphia connection. Back in 1966, Daniel Elazar, who divided his time between teaching at Temple University and at Bar-Ilan University in Israel, published American Federalism: A View From the States . Elazar argued that America has three regional political cultures: the moralistic political culture of upper New England and much of the West and Midwest, the individualistic political culture of the middle-Atlantic states and diverse big cities like Chicago, and the traditionalistic political culture of the South.
NEWS
July 29, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
You can't make this stuff up. No, you wouldn't want to make this stuff up about a presidential candidate who could wind up running this country. Donald Trump actually said yesterday that he hoped Russia had hacked into Hillary Clinton's email server and would now release 30,000 emails. In other words, the GOP candidate sanctioned cyber-spying by a foreign nation in order to influence an election in his favor. This just as U.S. intelligence agencies say they are highly confident - as are well-known cybersecurity firms - that it was Russian government spy agencies that hacked into the Democratic National Committee's emails, 20,000 of which were released the day before the convention with the clear intent of undercutting Clinton.
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