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Interfaith Marriages

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NEWS
February 1, 2004 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
All marriages are mixed, whether it be in politics, age or religion, says Bill Wine, Wyncote resident and associate professor of communication at La Salle University. Wine's own marriage is mixed religiously - he is Jewish, and his wife was raised Catholic - a pairing that gave him handy insights for his latest stage comedy, Mixed Doubles. The comedy will be performed by the King of Prussia Players beginning Friday. Framed in short scenes in one long act, Mixed Doubles looks at the marital ups and downs of three interfaith couples who play tennis together.
NEWS
July 18, 2001 | By Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With jury selection scheduled to begin next month in the murder trial of Rabbi Fred J. Neulander, the judge who will preside over the case put the finishing touches yesterday on a lengthy questionnaire to be filled out by prospective jurors. "I think the questions, as phrased, are focused and balanced and are more than adequate," said Camden County Superior Court Judge Linda G. Baxter, who has scheduled jury selection to start Aug. 20. The questionnaires, which have about 150 questions, are aimed at helping the prosecution and the defense select a jury to fairly decide the case against Rabbi Neulander, 59, who is accused of arranging the November 1994 killing of his wife, Carol.
NEWS
July 20, 1994 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Lena Romanoff's advice to concerned Jewish parents is simple: Forbid your children to date non-Jews. Forbid? Yes, said Romanoff, that's a very strong word to use with teenagers, but she is adamant that it is the only way to prevent interfaith marriages and the problems that may arise from such unions. Romanoff, 45, a convert to Judaism from Roman Catholicism, is the director of the Jewish Converts & Interfaith Network and has been counseling interfaith couples for 20 years.
NEWS
May 4, 1994 | Daily News wire services
PORTLAND, ORE. SOURCES: DEAL CUT IN KERRIGAN CASE The three men accused of plotting with Tonya Harding's ex-husband to hobble skater Nancy Kerrigan struck plea bargains that will get them 18 months in jail, sources say. Shawn Eckardt, Shane Stant and Derrick Smith agreed to plead guilty to conspiracy to commit assault, legal sources close to the case said yesterday. Any fines will be set by the judge at sentencing May 16. Smith confirmed his own agreement. "I'm happy that it's finally happened," he said.
NEWS
October 29, 1992 | By Beverly M. Payton, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When 5-year-old Robin Heagy asked the time-honored question during a Passover Seder in April - "Why is this night different from all other nights?" - what was different during that night's ceremony was that her father, instead of her maternal grandfather, answered the question. Robin's father, Jeffrey, was raised Roman Catholic, but no longer professes the Christian faith. Her mother, Debbie, is Jewish. In years before, Debbie's father conducted the Seder ceremony. But thanks to an educational program for interfaith families at the Shir Ami Bucks County Jewish Congregation in Newtown Township, Jeffrey Heagy was able to assume the traditional role for a father in a Jewish household.
NEWS
April 29, 2005 | By Benjamin Y. Lowe INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rabbi Aileen Hollander dreams of the day when she does not have to carry her congregation's Torah in from her car to prepare for a service. Hollander's relatively young flock, Beth Chaim Reform Congregation, has wandered Chester County, often using churches, public schools and conference rooms to hold services. Its travels are expected to end next year, when the congregation plans to open a $2.6 million synagogue in East Whiteland Township. "I don't think we appreciate how much less work there will be," she said.
NEWS
May 18, 1994 | By Galina Espinoza, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Seated in a black leather swivel chair, her chin-length hair in a perfect bob, Harriet Young picks up her clipboard and goes to work. Her job is to find the perfect mate for the client seated across from her. The line of questioning begins: Where did you go to school? What do you do for a living? How would someone else describe you? Sunlight streams in, warming the room. The sticker on the file cabinet says "Lookin' for Love. " But if at first this place seems like an ordinary dating service, Young's questions soon take a distinct turn: When was the last time you went to synagogue?
NEWS
May 5, 1998 | By Douglas Belkin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Cardinal Anthony J. Bevilacqua walked into Miss Daniel's eighth-grade classroom yesterday at the St. Maria Goretti Parish in Hatfield, you might have thought a firecracker had gone off, judging by the way 65 people jumped to their feet. Reflex? Parochial school training? Three nuns in the back if the classroom? None of the above. "It's him," said Lillian Delaney, a Telford resident who made a special trip to Hatfield to catch a glimpse of the cardinal. "I sort of put him in the same category as [former Philadelphia Cardinal]
NEWS
July 19, 1998 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Monica Yant contributed to this article
Cheltenham Township once was a vibrant frontier of Jewish life in the region. Sitting just over the city line in Montgomery County, it remains the home of 13 percent of Southeastern Pennsylvania's Jews, seven synagogues, and such important institutions as Gratz College, the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College, and the Perelman-Schechter Day School. Lately, though, there is a nervous buzz in the air. Jewish residents can't help but wonder: Has their community lost its cachet for young Jews?
NEWS
April 6, 2003 | By Johanna Markind FOR THE INQUIRER
The 1990 National Jewish Population Survey sent a shock wave through the American Jewish community by finding that 28 percent of U.S. Jews were intermarried and that in the previous five years, 52 percent of marriages had been to non-Jews. One outgrowth of the study has been increased programming for intermarried couples. A "Passover Seder Workshop for Interfaith Couples and Families," hosted last Sunday by Or Hadash synagogue in Fort Washington, was one such program. The event was organized by Faithways Interfaith Family Support Network, which the Jewish Family & Children's Service started five years ago as a pilot program in response to the 1990 survey.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 29, 2005 | By Benjamin Y. Lowe INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rabbi Aileen Hollander dreams of the day when she does not have to carry her congregation's Torah in from her car to prepare for a service. Hollander's relatively young flock, Beth Chaim Reform Congregation, has wandered Chester County, often using churches, public schools and conference rooms to hold services. Its travels are expected to end next year, when the congregation plans to open a $2.6 million synagogue in East Whiteland Township. "I don't think we appreciate how much less work there will be," she said.
NEWS
February 1, 2004 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
All marriages are mixed, whether it be in politics, age or religion, says Bill Wine, Wyncote resident and associate professor of communication at La Salle University. Wine's own marriage is mixed religiously - he is Jewish, and his wife was raised Catholic - a pairing that gave him handy insights for his latest stage comedy, Mixed Doubles. The comedy will be performed by the King of Prussia Players beginning Friday. Framed in short scenes in one long act, Mixed Doubles looks at the marital ups and downs of three interfaith couples who play tennis together.
NEWS
April 6, 2003 | By Johanna Markind FOR THE INQUIRER
The 1990 National Jewish Population Survey sent a shock wave through the American Jewish community by finding that 28 percent of U.S. Jews were intermarried and that in the previous five years, 52 percent of marriages had been to non-Jews. One outgrowth of the study has been increased programming for intermarried couples. A "Passover Seder Workshop for Interfaith Couples and Families," hosted last Sunday by Or Hadash synagogue in Fort Washington, was one such program. The event was organized by Faithways Interfaith Family Support Network, which the Jewish Family & Children's Service started five years ago as a pilot program in response to the 1990 survey.
NEWS
July 18, 2001 | By Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With jury selection scheduled to begin next month in the murder trial of Rabbi Fred J. Neulander, the judge who will preside over the case put the finishing touches yesterday on a lengthy questionnaire to be filled out by prospective jurors. "I think the questions, as phrased, are focused and balanced and are more than adequate," said Camden County Superior Court Judge Linda G. Baxter, who has scheduled jury selection to start Aug. 20. The questionnaires, which have about 150 questions, are aimed at helping the prosecution and the defense select a jury to fairly decide the case against Rabbi Neulander, 59, who is accused of arranging the November 1994 killing of his wife, Carol.
NEWS
July 19, 1998 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Monica Yant contributed to this article
Cheltenham Township once was a vibrant frontier of Jewish life in the region. Sitting just over the city line in Montgomery County, it remains the home of 13 percent of Southeastern Pennsylvania's Jews, seven synagogues, and such important institutions as Gratz College, the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College, and the Perelman-Schechter Day School. Lately, though, there is a nervous buzz in the air. Jewish residents can't help but wonder: Has their community lost its cachet for young Jews?
NEWS
May 5, 1998 | By Douglas Belkin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Cardinal Anthony J. Bevilacqua walked into Miss Daniel's eighth-grade classroom yesterday at the St. Maria Goretti Parish in Hatfield, you might have thought a firecracker had gone off, judging by the way 65 people jumped to their feet. Reflex? Parochial school training? Three nuns in the back if the classroom? None of the above. "It's him," said Lillian Delaney, a Telford resident who made a special trip to Hatfield to catch a glimpse of the cardinal. "I sort of put him in the same category as [former Philadelphia Cardinal]
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1998 | By Robert Strauss, FOR THE INQUIRER The New York Daily News contributed to this report
Back in the 1972-73 season, a show called Bridget Loves Bernie made television history. In it, Bernie Steinberg, a struggling Jewish writer/cabdriver played by David Birney, married an Irish Catholic schoolteacher named Bridget Fitzgerald, played by Meredith Baxter. Bridget Loves Bernie was a reasonably funny show - and its stars married in real life afterward - but it offended some Jewish and Catholic groups, and CBS pulled it off the air, despite its being the fifth-highest-rated show of the season.
NEWS
January 2, 1998 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
"Interfaith Families and Jewish Life on the Threshold of the 21st Century" is the title of a forum to be held at 7:30 p.m. Monday at Temple Sholom, 55 N. Church Lane, Broomall. The program is sponsored by the Suburban West Division of the Jewish Community Relations Council of Greater Philadelphia. Participants include Rabbi Mayer Selekman of Temple Sholom and Martin Schneer, associate executive vice president of the Jewish Community Centers of Greater Philadelphia. Several interfaith couples will also share their experiences.
NEWS
June 17, 1997 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Interfaith marriages and relocations appear to have taken a toll on the local Jewish population, according to a new survey. The number of Jews in Philadelphia and the four surrounding Pennsylvania counties has declined 16.7 percent since 1983, a study by the Jewish Federation of Greater Philadelphia finds. Released yesterday, the survey reports that the Jewish population in the city and in Chester, Delaware, Montgomery and Bucks Counties now stands at around 200,300 - down from the 240,400 who lived here 13 years ago. The number of Jewish households (i.e.
NEWS
July 20, 1994 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Lena Romanoff's advice to concerned Jewish parents is simple: Forbid your children to date non-Jews. Forbid? Yes, said Romanoff, that's a very strong word to use with teenagers, but she is adamant that it is the only way to prevent interfaith marriages and the problems that may arise from such unions. Romanoff, 45, a convert to Judaism from Roman Catholicism, is the director of the Jewish Converts & Interfaith Network and has been counseling interfaith couples for 20 years.
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