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Interior Design

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2012 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
  When Justin Mitchell and Karina Restrepo created the Mi Cumbia Spa on 17th Street, they didn't hire a decorator. Mitchell, an artist, approached the task as Albert C. Barnes would have evaluated a piece of art. To appreciate Mitchell's approach - and that of so many others who have studied the Barnesian method - you must understand Barnes. Imagine you have never seen or heard of the Mona Lisa or its creator. When you do get to view the painting at the Louvre, you admire the artist's use of color, the lines or shapes he has created, the illusion of distance, and the marvelous light he installed on the subject's face and breast and in the background.
NEWS
April 6, 2003 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
From Burlington to Las Vegas, Mycle Gorman has been raking in awards for his interior-design firm, which has transformed and settled into the old McCrory's store on Mill Street. Since its move to the borough in the fall, Design Works has been singled out by the National Council of Senior Housing, the Builders League of South Jersey, and the Home Builders Association of Bucks and Montgomery Counties. Gorman, who purchased the company about five years ago, credited its success to the camaraderie among its nine employees and the close working relationship with builders.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Beatrice Fischel-Bock, Madeline Fraser, and Lizzie Grover studied interior design at George Washington University. But they got a crash course in business management during a recent appearance on Shark Tank , the ABC reality series that matches investors and entrepreneurs. The website of their online interior-design business, Zoom Interiors, got 40,000 hits the night the show aired and has been buzzing ever since. Fraser, who had been bracing herself for trolls, was surprised: "We're booked for two weeks solid with clients right now. We have like 800 clients on the books, and it's growing every day. " That followed an offer on the show from real estate mogul Barbara Corcoran to invest $100,000 in return for a 33 percent stake in the business.
NEWS
July 20, 2015 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there A new degree in interior design from Philadelphia University in hand and a new job in Manhattan secured, Heather Ann took her mom, Rosanne, to Peddler's Village for a celebratory lunch and afternoon of shopping. Heather carried a bouquet of red Gerber daisies for a friend she was meeting later. "Oh, for me?" joked Andy, then manager of the Italian restaurant. "No," said Heather Ann. "Table for two, please. " Heather Ann wanted only food, retail, and mother-daughter togetherness.
NEWS
November 14, 2011 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was a long-held dream come true for Kano Williams when he opened his Island Vybez Jamaican Restaurant in August on Federal Street in East Camden, and he came up with a shrewd way to boost his business - giving away bottled water with each delivery. The marketing gimmick might have cost the Jamaica native his life: As he waited in his car for one of his cooks to bring out water for a delivery he was making on the afternoon of Oct. 5, Williams, 30, was shot and killed at close range by a man police say was a friend.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2013 | By Samantha Melamed, For The Inquirer
A few years ago, Luna Schlein, an interior design graduate student at Drexel University, posted some ads on Craigslist to drum up business for her one-woman company, Sanctuary Interior Design. It didn't go quite as she'd hoped. "I got a couple people contacting me, but then when they found out how much it cost, I never heard back," Schlein said. "So I got the idea that people were really attracted to my portfolio and my style, and maybe they could afford the furniture - but they couldn't afford the custom interior design service on top of that.
NEWS
April 28, 2015
T ONYA COMER, 43, of Fishtown, owns Tonya Comer Interiors, a design firm with residential and business clients in nine states and the District of Columbia. The Pittsburgh native grew up in a public-housing project and was raised by a single parent. She has an undergraduate degree from Duquesne and an MBA from Michigan State. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for the company? A: I discovered a passion for interior design working for an office-furniture company. A client asked me to design her kitchen.
LIVING
February 4, 2000 | By Bo Niles, FOR THE INQUIRER
Just when you thought the so-called "style-book" phenomenon might be tapering off, a new crop blooms. In the spring, bookstores will be crammed with style books. You won't be able to miss them - the word style is in every title. Recent editions include an in-depth portrait of the Pacific Northwest. For an area so lush with natural beauty, this region, which runs north from Oregon through Washington into lower British Columbia, has been curiously overlooked in terms of its impact on design.
NEWS
November 29, 1990 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
Joshua C. Thompson of Bryn Mawr has been named a principal at Garofolo, Curtiss & Co., an executive-search firm with headquarters in Ardmore. Thompson has spent more than 30 years in banking. He is the former chief operating officer of Atlantic Financial. Thompson previously was executive vice president at Meridian Bancorp Inc. and was president and chief operating officer of Central Penn National Bank. Thompson is a former member of the Association of Reserve City Bankers and was chairman of both the Philadelphia Clearinghouse Association and Group I of the Pennsylvania Bankers Association.
NEWS
February 20, 1992 | By Valerie Reed, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
The Central Bucks Chamber of Commerce is seeking entries for its fifth annual Excellence in Design Awards, which recognize creatitivity in architecture, interior design, planning and landscape architecture. "The purpose of the competition is to foster good design in the community, recognize people responsible for it and cause other people in the field to measure up," said architect George Donovan, who is chairing the program for the chamber. The entries, which will be accepted until March 16, must describe projects that have been completed within the last 10 years.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 20, 2015 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there A new degree in interior design from Philadelphia University in hand and a new job in Manhattan secured, Heather Ann took her mom, Rosanne, to Peddler's Village for a celebratory lunch and afternoon of shopping. Heather carried a bouquet of red Gerber daisies for a friend she was meeting later. "Oh, for me?" joked Andy, then manager of the Italian restaurant. "No," said Heather Ann. "Table for two, please. " Heather Ann wanted only food, retail, and mother-daughter togetherness.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Beatrice Fischel-Bock, Madeline Fraser, and Lizzie Grover studied interior design at George Washington University. But they got a crash course in business management during a recent appearance on Shark Tank , the ABC reality series that matches investors and entrepreneurs. The website of their online interior-design business, Zoom Interiors, got 40,000 hits the night the show aired and has been buzzing ever since. Fraser, who had been bracing herself for trolls, was surprised: "We're booked for two weeks solid with clients right now. We have like 800 clients on the books, and it's growing every day. " That followed an offer on the show from real estate mogul Barbara Corcoran to invest $100,000 in return for a 33 percent stake in the business.
NEWS
April 28, 2015
T ONYA COMER, 43, of Fishtown, owns Tonya Comer Interiors, a design firm with residential and business clients in nine states and the District of Columbia. The Pittsburgh native grew up in a public-housing project and was raised by a single parent. She has an undergraduate degree from Duquesne and an MBA from Michigan State. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for the company? A: I discovered a passion for interior design working for an office-furniture company. A client asked me to design her kitchen.
NEWS
April 13, 2015 | By Rick Nichols, For The Inquirer
In her atelier, three flights up in a converted warehouse in postindustrial Kensington, silent occupants mark the long march of Meg Rodgers. There is the music stand (an early woodworking project). There are the cats (Sarah and Rocky, once local strays). There is the exquisitely handcrafted divan (from a furniture-maker friend). And shelves of books, among them The World of Islamic Art , still tagged on pages that inspired the colors for her 1994 breakout restaurant interior of the Striped Bass.
NEWS
March 16, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dorothea Andes, 86, of Villanova and Haverford, an interior designer with a deft touch who used her creative talent to build a company and nurture numerous arts and civic organizations in the city, died Friday, March 6, after a long battle with cancer. Known lovingly to all who knew her as "Dottebob," she was the wife of prominent businessman and civic leader Charles L. Andes, who last served as chief executive officer of the Franklin Mint in Philadelphia. Charles Andes died in 2006.
NEWS
March 6, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JIM RHINEHART looked out over the hungry people enjoying a hot meal at the Church of the Advocate and pronounced it good. "This is my spiritual fulfillment," he said one day in 2006. "It's the whole idea of working with people and being part of a movement for the betterment of people. " The historic Episcopal church had been feeding hungry people in need since 1981, and Jim Rhinehart had been part of it from the beginning. His work with the church soup kitchen was only one of the ways in which Jim Rhinehart served his community.
NEWS
February 2, 2015 | By Al Haas, For The Inquirer
The Renegade, Jeep's new entry in the small crossover wars, isn't just a capable critter on slippery roads. In its specially equipped Trailhawk form, it is easily the best little off-roader in the business. In addition to its bush-whacking prowess, the 2015 Renegade is a head-turner. Its utilitarian, masculine, yet lovable demeanor is joined by a number of retro touches, such as the vertical seven-slat grille inspired by the front of a WWII Jeep. Those heritage evocations turn into whimsy elsewhere on the vehicle.
TRAVEL
October 6, 2014 | By Brittany Liller, For The Inquirer
In true New York fashion, the woman on the other end of the line taking our room reservation stated: "It's like a bed and breakfast, except I don't do anything. " Never being high-maintenance travelers, combined with a desire to go somewhere other than the Jersey Shore, my friends and I left Philadelphia and headed off to Fire Island, N.Y. A small island located a short ferry ride from Bay Shore, N.Y., Fire Island is known for its beach, nightlife, and lack of cars (none). Transportation to different parts of the island consisted of water taxis or wagons.
NEWS
May 30, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Steven A. Weixler, 60, of Society Hill, an interior designer, died Wednesday, April 30, of a rare neurological disorder at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Born in Louisville, Ky., Mr. Weixler graduated with a bachelor's degree in architecture from the University of Kentucky. He moved to Chicago, and then to Philadelphia in 1981. Shortly after arriving, he met Walter Peterson, who became a close friend for more than 30 years. In 1983, they formed Peterson & Weixler, an interior-design firm.
NEWS
April 12, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
James A. Malick II, 59, of Pennsauken, a designer of fast-food restaurant interiors, died Saturday, April 5, at Kennedy University Hospital in Cherry Hill following a heart attack at Bonair-Nigorski baseball field in Pennsauken. "He was preparing the field for a game" for the Pennsauken Youth Athletic Activities baseball season when he was stricken, his son James III said. Mr. Malick was president of the PYAA Babe Ruth baseball division, for players from 13 to 16 years old, as well as an umpire for their games.
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