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NEWS
December 21, 1999 | By Andrea Gerlin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An editorial appearing in a leading medical journal today calls on doctors and hospitals to disclose their mistakes to patients and families and to apologize when they occur. The editorial in the Annals of Internal Medicine, written by Albert Wu of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, makes the case that withholding information about errors is not only unethical, but also costly, because such decisions can inspire litigation. Prompt and full disclosure, Wu argues, may reduce expensive malpractice suits and legal expenses.
NEWS
June 25, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Scott Shapiro treats patients with clogged arteries, heart failure, and other classic cardiovascular diseases that strike millions of adults. Yet over the next year, the cardiologist says, he will spend dozens of hours cramming to learn intricate details about other conditions that he does not treat in his Abington practice, such as rare congenital heart defects. He and other leaders of the Pennsylvania Medical Society are part of heated national debate over how to ensure that physicians maintain their skills.
NEWS
May 20, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
George F. Selhat, 93, of Jenkintown, a physician who practiced at Jeanes Hospital in Northeast Philadelphia for more than a half century, died Wednesday, May 14, of cancer at home. Born and raised in Istanbul, Turkey, he moved to the United States in 1959. Dr. Selhat graduated from the University of Istanbul in 1952 with a medical degree. He served a residency in medicine at Jeanes Hospital from 1959 to 1963, and an internship in internal medicine at Hahnemann University Hospital in 1964.
NEWS
November 16, 2010 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is perhaps telling that Joseph Majdan waited until he was thin to vent his frustration at fellow doctors who made his life miserable when he was fat. The cardiologist and assistant professor will say only that the poignant essay he has written for the Annals of Internal Medicine - "Memoirs of an Obese Physician" - was a long time coming. "I've always thought about writing this article because it haunted me, and it was a story that I think had to be told," he said last week in his office at Jefferson Medical College, where he was surrounded by pictures of his family, of his dogs, and of him when he looked twice as big as many of his friends.
NEWS
July 24, 1989 | By Rebecca Barnard, Special to The Inquirer
Dr. Ian Joel Berman, 47, a specialist in hematology and oncology, died yesterday at his home in Moorestown. Dr. Berman was chairman of the department of internal medicine at Delaware Valley Medical Center in Langhorne. In 1974, he founded Regional Internal Medical Associates in Langhorne. He was attending physician and a consultant in hematology and oncology at Saint Mary Hospital in Langhorne and Frankford Hospital in Philadelphia. He was an assistant professor of medicine at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine and Hahnemann University in Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 22, 1988 | By Connie O'Kane, Special to The Inquirer
Officials at Deborah Heart and Lung Center in Browns Mills said yesterday that they had reached an agreement with medical officials that would allow the hospital to continue its cardiology training program for 14 physicians through 1992. The Philadelphia branch office of the American Board of Internal Medicine approved a plan Tuesday to allow physicians in the hospital's cardiology fellowship program to receive additional training at the Robert Wood Johnson Medical Center in New Brunswick, according to Lorraine Ryan, spokeswoman for the hospital.
NEWS
December 18, 1994 | By Vyola P. Willson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Meridian Bank has created a Technology Banking Group at the Great Valley Corporate Center to provide financial services to the region's high-tech companies. About one-third of the state's 2,500 high-tech companies are in the Philadelphia area, according to David R. Bright, president of the bank's Delaware Valley division. "The region is also one of the nation's largest sources of venture capital funds, with approximately $1 billion under management," he said. Steven Hobman of West Chester, who has been in the bank's corporate lending operation for 11 years, will head the new group as vice president.
NEWS
April 4, 2003 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jay H. Davidson, 84, of Haverford, a specialist in internal medicine and gastroenterology, died of prostate cancer March 27 at home. For 49 years, Dr. Davidson maintained an office in Center City. His son Bruce, also a physician, said that after Dr. Davidson retired in 1999, he reviewed medical disability appeals for the Social Security Administration until last year and kept up with medical and scientific journals. For many years, Dr. Davidson was director of medical education, in charge of the intern program at St. Luke's and Children's Medical Center, which later became Guiffre Medical Center.
NEWS
February 9, 2000 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Leon J. Weiner, 74, a traditional medical doctor who was willing to consider nontraditional means to help his patients, died Monday at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. He lived in Meadowbrook. Dr. Weiner practiced internal medicine in Northeast Philadelphia for nearly 40 years and was known as a physician who took time to listen, even as the demands of managed-care medicine crowded in. He had a particular interest in the elderly and preached against ageism long before it became popular.
NEWS
December 29, 1994 | By Bill Price, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Donald A. Dupler, 80, retired chief of cardiology at Lankenau Hospital, died Monday at his home in Bryn Mawr. Nationally prominent through his work and support of the American College of Cardiology, with headquarters in Bethesda, Md., Dr. Dupler practiced internal medicine and cardiology for nearly 40 years. He was chief of cardiology at Lankenau Hospital from 1967 until retiring about a decade ago. Before that, he was chief of internal medicine and clinical cardiology at Presbyterian Medical Center of Philadelphia and formerly was chief of the Cardiac Clinic at Graduate Hospital in Philadelphia.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 18, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Dr. Theodore Rodman didn't happen upon his patients only in the medical school and hospital at Temple University. "Once in a while," his former administrative assistant Kathy Clark Kelley said, "he liked to go around the corner from the hospital" for a roast beef sandwich. "More than once, he brought back a sickly guy," she said, "probably a ditch digger or construction worker. " The guy was "maybe wheezing, maybe coughing," and Dr. Rodman "provided him with the care that he needed, free of charge, no chart, no questions asked.
NEWS
June 25, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Scott Shapiro treats patients with clogged arteries, heart failure, and other classic cardiovascular diseases that strike millions of adults. Yet over the next year, the cardiologist says, he will spend dozens of hours cramming to learn intricate details about other conditions that he does not treat in his Abington practice, such as rare congenital heart defects. He and other leaders of the Pennsylvania Medical Society are part of heated national debate over how to ensure that physicians maintain their skills.
NEWS
June 5, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
Dana Walrath discovered graphic narratives while her mother, then in the middle stages of Alzheimer's disease, was living with her. Her mother's ability to use and understand language was failing, but she devoured such sophisticated illustrated books as Maus and Persepolis that took on, respectively, the Holocaust and growing up in Iran. "She was able to bring the story in through a visual channel," said Walrath, a medical anthropologist at the University of Vermont who earned her doctorate at the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
January 23, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Hugh M. Lasch, 47, of Mount Laurel, a former Lumberton gastroenterologist, died of complications from atrial fibrillation on Friday, Jan. 15, at home. He was the son of Hugh C. Lasch, a 27-year veteran of the Philadelphia Police Department, who worked as a patrolman in the canine unit, said the senior Lasch's brother, Clifford.. "He was on the mayor's detail" for a couple of administrations, Clifford Lasch said, and retired from a unit at Philadelphia International Airport. Dr. Lasch was a 1986 graduate of St. Joseph's Preparatory School and earned a premed bachelor's degree at the University of Scranton in 1990.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2015
BETWEEN all the football and turkey, why not show some gratitude for your health and that beautiful body that carries you through life? Contrary to popular belief, you don't need high-intensity, sweating-buckets, feel-like-I'm-going-to-die workouts to get into good shape. To get into and maintain your fitness, you can get inspiration from the classic Aesop fable, "The Tortoise and the Hare. " You know the one, where the fast arrogant hare hangs his head in the agony of defeat, as the victorious tortoise declares, "Slow and steady wins the race!"
NEWS
November 30, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
William J. Hammer, 71, formerly of Lower Gwynedd, a cardiologist, medical staff leader, and educator, died Sunday, Nov. 15, of heart failure on Kiawah Island, S.C., where he had lived since 2013. Dr. Hammer was a practicing cardiologist and chairman of the department of medicine at Chestnut Hill Hospital for more than 25 years. Born and reared in Germantown, he was the only child of Anna and William Hammer. He was a 1961 graduate of Northeast Catholic High School and a 1965 graduate of La Salle College.
NEWS
June 11, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
David A. Bevan, 71, of Gladwyne, a retired rheumatologist at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM), died of cardiac arrest Saturday, June 6, in St. Michaels, Md., after an afternoon of sailing. He was a week away from celebrating his 46th wedding anniversary, his family said. Dr. Bevan was professor, chair, and course director of rheumatology in Osteopathic Hospital's department of internal medicine. Dr. Bevan later was affiliated with Suburban General Hospital in Norristown.
NEWS
February 9, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Donald Vail Rhoads, 86, an internist and an active Philadelphia-area Quaker, died Tuesday, Jan. 27, of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Foulkeways at Gwynedd. Dr. Rhoads, of Chestnut Hill, was a graduate of Westtown School, Stanford University, and the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. He served an internship at Pennsylvania Hospital. He completed a three-year fellowship in internal medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and received his master's degree in internal medicine from the University of Minnesota in 1960.
NEWS
December 10, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Brittany Maynard and the Death With Dignity movement have received significant attention this fall, but one stalwart in end-of-life care says the push for physician-assisted suicide is premature, and distracts from a much more important issue. Joanne Lynn, a geriatrician, hospice physician, former Medicare medical director, and author, has spent her career fighting to improve care of the dying. She says laws such as Oregon's - allowing terminally ill, mentally competent people such as Maynard, with six months or less to live, to end their lives - would not be applicable to most Americans.
NEWS
December 2, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Jay A. Desjardins, 84, formerly of Havertown, a retired internist, died of pneumonia Sunday, Nov. 23, at Barclay Friends in West Chester. Dr. Desjardins practiced internal medicine for 35 years in Havertown, and was an attending physician at Fitzgerald Mercy, Riddle Memorial, and Delaware County Memorial Hospitals. His family said he was a respected doctor at a time when diagnostic imaging and laboratory studies were unavailable, and when health care was very personal.
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