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International Aid

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NEWS
May 15, 2008 | FROM INQUIRER NEWS SERVICES
The directors of several relief organizations in Myanmar said yesterday that some of the international aid arriving in the country for the victims of Cyclone Nargis was being stolen, diverted or warehoused by the country's army. A tropical depression in the Bay of Bengal added new worries with the potential to sweep into the country's stricken area, but late in the day, forecasters said the depression was weakening and unlikely to grow into a cyclone. Thailand's prime minister, Samak Sundaravej, flew to Yangon yesterday to try to persuade Myanmar's leaders to allow more foreign-aid workers into the country.
NEWS
July 7, 2006 | By Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and Hilary Benn
This time last year, a remarkable campaign involving millions of people was reaching its climax. The aim was to press world leaders meeting at the G-8 summit in Gleneagles, Scotland, into decisive action on global poverty. Thanks in no small part to the weight of public opinion behind the ONE Campaign to make poverty history and the Live 8 concerts, the international community listened and acted. World leaders at Gleneagles agreed to double aid, write off debts, train peacekeepers, make AIDS drugs available to all, and help poor countries achieve free universal primary education and access to basic health care.
NEWS
April 21, 1991
As world attention focuses on the American, British and French efforts to alleviate the suffering of Kurdish refugees fleeing toward Turkey, hundreds of thousands continue to stream into Iran. In fact Iran has shouldered the brunt of the refugee disaster, admitting close to one million Kurds so far, more than double the number in Turkey, but has received very little international aid. Iran, whose economy is still recovering from a decade of war, has already committed about $57 million of its own money to house and feed the refugees in an effort that Western diplomats in Tehran say has been remarkably charitable.
NEWS
February 4, 2013 | Reviewed by Nahal Toosi
The Big Truck That Went By How the World Came to Save Haiti and Left Behind a Disaster By Jonathan M. Katz Palgrave Macmillan. 320 pp. $26   After 2 1/2 years in Haiti, Jonathan Katz was preparing to leave the impoverished but endlessly intriguing nation in January 2010. His next reporting assignment: Afghanistan. Then a massive earthquake that sounded like a big truck roaring by ripped apart his house, his plans, and the lives of Haitians all around him. So Katz, then an Associated Press reporter and the only full-time American correspondent in Haiti, wound up staying to chronicle the quake's aftermath.
NEWS
May 13, 2008
For nine days, the world waited in frustration for the military rulers of Myanmar to accept international aid needed to save at least one million survivors of a cyclone. The storm and flooding on May 3 left at least 60,000 people dead or missing. Survivors have no shelter, food or safe drinking water, a situation that threatens to raise the death toll tenfold from disease and starvation. Finally, yesterday, the first U.S. military cargo plane carrying water and blankets was allowed to land in the southeast Asian country, also known as Burma.
NEWS
December 1, 2000
Today, on World Aids Day 2000, the epidemic is far worse than even the doomsayers predicted. The most pessimistic scientific projections a decade ago were 50 percent short of the actual devastation reported this week by the United Nations: 36.1 million infected worldwide (21 million already dead), 5.3 million new infections and 3 million people expected to die this year. One stunning illustration of the impact of the disease was the revelation yesterday by the International Red Cross/Red Crescent that 100,000 of its own volunteers have HIV/AIDS.
NEWS
September 12, 2006 | Daily News wire services
Missouri prison guard shoots ex in jail hallway A Missouri prison guard fatally shot his estranged girlfriend, then turned the gun on himself while both were on duty at a women's prison, authorities said. Daniel Bunton, 35, and Stacey Davis, 31, died in the murder-suicide Sunday at Chillicothe Correctional Center, the coroner said. Bunton and Davis passed each other in a hallway Sunday afternoon and "exchanged words," the coroner said. Moments later, "he shot her from behind and then he took his own life.
NEWS
December 17, 1993 | Daily News wire services
TOKYO 2 MARINE JETS MISSING AT SEA Two F/A-18 Hornet jetfighters of the U.S. Marine Corps crashed into the Pacific Ocean off Okinawa in southern Japan today, a Japanese air force spokesman said. The pilots, who were not immediately identified, were missing. It was not clear if they ejected from their planes before the crash, the spokesman said. The Japanese air force dispatched rescue helicopters and reconnaissance planes to search for them. SARAJEVO NEW TALKS AIM TO FIND PEACE Bosnian Muslims and Serbs talked peace yesterday while trading shells and bullets in the prelude to another effort to end 20 months of war. Austrian Foreign Minister Alois Mock told official TV that a new round of peace talks would be held in Vienna today.
NEWS
February 18, 1992 | BY RICHARD GEPHARDT, From the New York Times
Beneath the veneer of competence, the Bush administration's strategy toward the former Soviet Union is a dangerously ineffective response to the greatest democratic awakening and market-opening opportunity of the 20th century. Just as Americans recognize how the administration has mismanaged the economy, they must now comprehend how its hesitant foreign policy jeopardizes our national security and economic interests. Boris Yeltsin recently told congressional leaders that Russia is "in a fight for survival" and had only three months to turn things around.
NEWS
February 23, 2012 | By Mohammed Daraghmeh, Associated Press
CAIRO - The leadership of the Islamic extremist Hamas settled internal disagreements and approved a unity deal Wednesday with its political rival, Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas, a senior official said. Hamas' political bureau, its top decision-making body, met in Cairo and signed off on the deal after more than 12 hours of talks over two days, said Izzat al-Rishq, an aide to Hamas chief Khaled Mashaal. Since 2007, the rivals have run separate governments - Abbas in the West Bank and Hamas in Gaza.
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NEWS
February 4, 2013 | Reviewed by Nahal Toosi
The Big Truck That Went By How the World Came to Save Haiti and Left Behind a Disaster By Jonathan M. Katz Palgrave Macmillan. 320 pp. $26   After 2 1/2 years in Haiti, Jonathan Katz was preparing to leave the impoverished but endlessly intriguing nation in January 2010. His next reporting assignment: Afghanistan. Then a massive earthquake that sounded like a big truck roaring by ripped apart his house, his plans, and the lives of Haitians all around him. So Katz, then an Associated Press reporter and the only full-time American correspondent in Haiti, wound up staying to chronicle the quake's aftermath.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Syria has become the world's ugliest reality show. Anyone with access to YouTube can watch grisly videos of Syrian government aircraft deliberately bombing civilians - in breadlines, mosques, universities, apartment buildings, and outdoor markets. No crime is too heinous for Bashar al-Assad's campaign to terrorize rebellious Syrians into obeisance. U.N. reports say 60,000 have already perished. Foreign Policy cites a secret State Department cable that says Assad probably used poison gas against civilians in Homs last month.
NEWS
February 23, 2012 | By Mohammed Daraghmeh, Associated Press
CAIRO - The leadership of the Islamic extremist Hamas settled internal disagreements and approved a unity deal Wednesday with its political rival, Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas, a senior official said. Hamas' political bureau, its top decision-making body, met in Cairo and signed off on the deal after more than 12 hours of talks over two days, said Izzat al-Rishq, an aide to Hamas chief Khaled Mashaal. Since 2007, the rivals have run separate governments - Abbas in the West Bank and Hamas in Gaza.
NEWS
September 20, 2011 | By Ashraf Khan, Associated Press
BADIN, Pakistan - Flood victims camped out near inundated fields and crowded hospitals Monday as authorities and international aid groups struggled to respond to Pakistan's second major bout of flooding in just over a year. Monsoon rains since early August have killed more than 220 people, damaged or destroyed about 665,000 homes, and displaced more than 1.8 million people in the southern Sindh province, according to the government and United Nations, which Sunday made an emergency appeal for funding.
NEWS
May 15, 2008 | FROM INQUIRER NEWS SERVICES
The directors of several relief organizations in Myanmar said yesterday that some of the international aid arriving in the country for the victims of Cyclone Nargis was being stolen, diverted or warehoused by the country's army. A tropical depression in the Bay of Bengal added new worries with the potential to sweep into the country's stricken area, but late in the day, forecasters said the depression was weakening and unlikely to grow into a cyclone. Thailand's prime minister, Samak Sundaravej, flew to Yangon yesterday to try to persuade Myanmar's leaders to allow more foreign-aid workers into the country.
NEWS
May 13, 2008
For nine days, the world waited in frustration for the military rulers of Myanmar to accept international aid needed to save at least one million survivors of a cyclone. The storm and flooding on May 3 left at least 60,000 people dead or missing. Survivors have no shelter, food or safe drinking water, a situation that threatens to raise the death toll tenfold from disease and starvation. Finally, yesterday, the first U.S. military cargo plane carrying water and blankets was allowed to land in the southeast Asian country, also known as Burma.
NEWS
May 12, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Richard Ferree Smith Sr., 85, of Chestnut Hill, a humanitarian who worked with Quaker and other groups in Palestine, South America and Philadelphia, died of a bacterial infection Wednesday at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Born in West Mount Airy, Mr. Smith graduated in 1940 from Germantown Friends School. While earning a bachelor's in history from Harvard University (Class of 1944), he met Virginia Meyer, a native of Chestnut Hill and a student at Wellesley College. They married in 1945.
NEWS
September 12, 2006 | Daily News wire services
Missouri prison guard shoots ex in jail hallway A Missouri prison guard fatally shot his estranged girlfriend, then turned the gun on himself while both were on duty at a women's prison, authorities said. Daniel Bunton, 35, and Stacey Davis, 31, died in the murder-suicide Sunday at Chillicothe Correctional Center, the coroner said. Bunton and Davis passed each other in a hallway Sunday afternoon and "exchanged words," the coroner said. Moments later, "he shot her from behind and then he took his own life.
NEWS
July 7, 2006 | By Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and Hilary Benn
This time last year, a remarkable campaign involving millions of people was reaching its climax. The aim was to press world leaders meeting at the G-8 summit in Gleneagles, Scotland, into decisive action on global poverty. Thanks in no small part to the weight of public opinion behind the ONE Campaign to make poverty history and the Live 8 concerts, the international community listened and acted. World leaders at Gleneagles agreed to double aid, write off debts, train peacekeepers, make AIDS drugs available to all, and help poor countries achieve free universal primary education and access to basic health care.
BUSINESS
November 3, 2005 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Emilio A. Emini, a leading HIV-vaccine scientist, is joining Wyeth to head vaccines research and development at the company's global pharmaceutical headquarters in Collegeville. For Emini, 51, it will be a homecoming of sorts. He spent two decades at Merck & Co. Inc., in West Point outside Philadelphia, most recently as senior vice president of vaccines and biologics research. Emini comes to Wyeth from the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative in New York, where he was chief of vaccine development since January 2004.
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