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International Aids Conference

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NEWS
July 22, 2012 | By David Brown, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - AIDS has killed 35 million people. It's caused physical pain and mental anguish for many who live with it. It's created a generation of African orphans. It's drained untold trillions of dollars from national economies and people's pockets. There's also one other way to describe the AIDS saga. It's a success story. AIDS tells the story of mankind's powers of observation, the capacity of science to figure things out, the importance of citizen movements, the globalization of problem-solving, the intolerance of extreme inequality, the impulse for generosity, the ability of government to do good.
NEWS
July 20, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The AIDS community mourned the loss of one of its top researchers and advocates in the jet crash in Ukraine, a "humanist" whose life - and death - reminded some of the death of another leading AIDS scientist, from Philadelphia, in a plane crash 16 years ago. Six delegates to the 20th International AIDS Conference - down from initial reports of 100 - were confirmed to have been on the plane, shot down en route from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia....
NEWS
July 27, 2012 | Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The AIDS epidemic increasingly is a female one, and women are making the case at the world's largest AIDS meeting that curbing it will require focusing on poverty and violence, not just pregnancy and pills. Already, women make up half of the world's HIV infections, and adolescent girls are at particular risk in the hardest-hit parts of the world, UNICEF deputy executive director Geeta Rao Gupta told the International AIDS Conference. About 4.8 million people 15 to 24 are living with HIV, and two-thirds are female.
NEWS
May 27, 1991 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The Bush administration may renew its policy of banning people infected with the AIDS virus from immigrating to the United States, scrapping earlier plans to overturn that stand, sources said this weekend. But a source at the Department of Health and Human Services said his department would "weigh in heavily against this" proposal. "It sends the wrong message to people outside the country - and to people inside the country. " James Mason, the assistant secretary for health, on Friday forwarded to HHS Secretary Louis W. Sullivan a proposed regulation that would retain the current prohibition on those infected with AIDS, said an HHS source who spoke to the Associated Press on grounds of anonymity.
NEWS
August 29, 1994 | by Tom Stoddard, New York Times
Quietly but persistently, AIDS has evolved into something quite different from the untreatable illness of the early '80s. It is still a killer, but medical science has made major life-sustaining gains against AIDS-related infections. But the government has largely ignored these successes. So have the media. Almost every report from the international AIDS conference in Yokohama communicated despair rather than possibility. They should start emphasizing the triumphs of science, because the well- being of thousands of people is at stake.
NEWS
July 22, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
Anyone can contract AIDS, but its victims are mostly those already forgotten by society — poor, medically underserved populations in developing nations as well as in an industrial giant like the United States.   Their plight should take center stage next week when the International AIDS Conference convenes in Washington to raise awareness of a disease that no longer grabs the world's headlines. This year's conference marks its first appearance in the United States following a more than two-decade boycott.
NEWS
September 12, 1991 | By Loretta Tofani and Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writers
Last week, they vented their anger at U.S. Sen. Jesse Helms by inflating a giant condom over his house outside Washington. Last year, they blasted horns, noisemakers and whistles at Health and Human Services Secretary Louis W. Sullivan to drown out his speech at an international AIDS conference. And when President Bush visits Philadelphia today, members of the AIDS activist group Act Up are planning a surprise for him, too. They won't say exactly what, but given Act Up's creative flair, it is likely to be dramatic.
NEWS
July 26, 2012 | By Allyn Gaestel, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Protesters from the International AIDS Conference, including 500 Philadelphians, braved raindrops and 94-degree heat to shout a passionate message outside the White House yesterday: "How many more have to die? Act up, fight back, and occupy!" Thousands of eclectically attired activists, sticky from the humid air and hoarse from chanting, marched from the Washington Convention Center to the White House with a simple message: "We can end AIDS. " The conference, a biannual gathering of scientists, policy makers, and practitioners working on HIV and AIDS, is held in a different city each year.
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University researchers have used state-of-the-art molecular scissors to cut out dormant HIV hiding in human cells, fueling hopes for curing - not just suppressing - the insidious infection that causes AIDS. The HIV removal experiment was conducted in cells in the lab, and the scissors did not work on every cell, so the approach is a long way from use in the clinic. Still, the study, published Monday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shows how new genetic editing technologies could be harnessed to conquer the AIDS virus.
NEWS
June 10, 1993 | By Huntly Collins, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In what he called "the first whiff of spring," Dr. Jonas Salk yesterday announced progress in his quest for a vaccine for people infected with the AIDS virus. Other leading researchers immediately turned up their noses, suggesting that the renowned scientist had made no breakthrough and that his work was being overly hyped by drug companies - including Rhone-Poulenc Rorer Inc. of Collegeville, outside of Philadelphia - that have a financial stake in the outcome. "I think it's a dog-and-pony show," said Dr. Robin Weiss, a prominent retrovirologist at London's Chester Beatty Laboratories.
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NEWS
July 22, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University researchers have used state-of-the-art molecular scissors to cut out dormant HIV hiding in human cells, fueling hopes for curing - not just suppressing - the insidious infection that causes AIDS. The HIV removal experiment was conducted in cells in the lab, and the scissors did not work on every cell, so the approach is a long way from use in the clinic. Still, the study, published Monday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shows how new genetic editing technologies could be harnessed to conquer the AIDS virus.
NEWS
July 20, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The AIDS community mourned the loss of one of its top researchers and advocates in the jet crash in Ukraine, a "humanist" whose life - and death - reminded some of the death of another leading AIDS scientist, from Philadelphia, in a plane crash 16 years ago. Six delegates to the 20th International AIDS Conference - down from initial reports of 100 - were confirmed to have been on the plane, shot down en route from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia....
NEWS
July 27, 2012 | Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The AIDS epidemic increasingly is a female one, and women are making the case at the world's largest AIDS meeting that curbing it will require focusing on poverty and violence, not just pregnancy and pills. Already, women make up half of the world's HIV infections, and adolescent girls are at particular risk in the hardest-hit parts of the world, UNICEF deputy executive director Geeta Rao Gupta told the International AIDS Conference. About 4.8 million people 15 to 24 are living with HIV, and two-thirds are female.
NEWS
July 26, 2012 | By Allyn Gaestel, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Protesters from the International AIDS Conference, including 500 Philadelphians, braved raindrops and 94-degree heat to shout a passionate message outside the White House yesterday: "How many more have to die? Act up, fight back, and occupy!" Thousands of eclectically attired activists, sticky from the humid air and hoarse from chanting, marched from the Washington Convention Center to the White House with a simple message: "We can end AIDS. " The conference, a biannual gathering of scientists, policy makers, and practitioners working on HIV and AIDS, is held in a different city each year.
NEWS
July 22, 2012 | By David Brown, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - AIDS has killed 35 million people. It's caused physical pain and mental anguish for many who live with it. It's created a generation of African orphans. It's drained untold trillions of dollars from national economies and people's pockets. There's also one other way to describe the AIDS saga. It's a success story. AIDS tells the story of mankind's powers of observation, the capacity of science to figure things out, the importance of citizen movements, the globalization of problem-solving, the intolerance of extreme inequality, the impulse for generosity, the ability of government to do good.
NEWS
July 22, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
Anyone can contract AIDS, but its victims are mostly those already forgotten by society — poor, medically underserved populations in developing nations as well as in an industrial giant like the United States.   Their plight should take center stage next week when the International AIDS Conference convenes in Washington to raise awareness of a disease that no longer grabs the world's headlines. This year's conference marks its first appearance in the United States following a more than two-decade boycott.
NEWS
June 19, 2000 | By Huntly Collins, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The rundown community hospital here in northern KwaZulu-Natal Province is crowded with gaunt men and women who lie two, sometimes three to a bed. No one knows how many are infected with the AIDS virus - the hospital is too poor to even test them. But at local prenatal clinics, one in three pregnant women is turning up HIV-positive, one of the highest infection rates in the world. It is here, at ground zero of South Africa's expanding AIDS epidemic, that scientists from the United States and South Africa are planning to test the only thing that might stop the scourge - an AIDS vaccine.
NEWS
August 29, 1994 | by Tom Stoddard, New York Times
Quietly but persistently, AIDS has evolved into something quite different from the untreatable illness of the early '80s. It is still a killer, but medical science has made major life-sustaining gains against AIDS-related infections. But the government has largely ignored these successes. So have the media. Almost every report from the international AIDS conference in Yokohama communicated despair rather than possibility. They should start emphasizing the triumphs of science, because the well- being of thousands of people is at stake.
NEWS
June 10, 1993 | By Huntly Collins, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In what he called "the first whiff of spring," Dr. Jonas Salk yesterday announced progress in his quest for a vaccine for people infected with the AIDS virus. Other leading researchers immediately turned up their noses, suggesting that the renowned scientist had made no breakthrough and that his work was being overly hyped by drug companies - including Rhone-Poulenc Rorer Inc. of Collegeville, outside of Philadelphia - that have a financial stake in the outcome. "I think it's a dog-and-pony show," said Dr. Robin Weiss, a prominent retrovirologist at London's Chester Beatty Laboratories.
NEWS
September 12, 1991 | By Loretta Tofani and Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writers
Last week, they vented their anger at U.S. Sen. Jesse Helms by inflating a giant condom over his house outside Washington. Last year, they blasted horns, noisemakers and whistles at Health and Human Services Secretary Louis W. Sullivan to drown out his speech at an international AIDS conference. And when President Bush visits Philadelphia today, members of the AIDS activist group Act Up are planning a surprise for him, too. They won't say exactly what, but given Act Up's creative flair, it is likely to be dramatic.
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