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NEWS
July 3, 2012 | By Adel Omran, Associated Press
ZINTAN, Libya - Libya on Monday released four International Criminal Court staffers who had been held for nearly four weeks on allegations that they had shared documents that could harm national security with Moammar Gadhafi's imprisoned son, Seif al-Islam Gadhafi. As they were released, ICC President Sang-Hyun Song, a South Korean judge, apologized to the Libyan government and people for the incident and promised an investigation into the allegations. Song flew to Libya for the hand-over.
NEWS
November 7, 2006 | By Gwynne Dyer
Occasionally, like any doomed man, Saddam Hussein played with the notion of a last-minute reprieve. "He's told us many times that we won't be able to" avoid a death sentence in his trial, said Khalil al-Dulaimi, one of his lawyers, in June. "He knows that the sentence has been issued from Washington. " But at that point, he was still indulging in the fantasy that this was part of an American plan to restore him to power. "He'll be the last resort; they'll have to knock on his door," Dulaimi said.
NEWS
December 4, 2012 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
She was a guest of Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands, but it wasn't royal connections that landed Philadelphia lawyer Enid H. Adler at the Hague. It was her years of work in helping to create a forum where others might seek justice. Adler's life as a teacher, journalist, and advocate for people fleeing persecution drove her to help establish the International Criminal Court, founded in 2002 for the prosecution of war crimes across the globe. Adler, semiretired and battling cancer, traveled to the Netherlands to take part in the official ceremonies last month marking the 10th anniversary of a permanent, independent, international court.
NEWS
February 26, 2002 | By Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Criminal trial. Military tribunal. International court. Where - and how - to prosecute suspected terrorists is posing an array of new legal challenges in the aftermath of the Sept. 11 attacks. Should terrorists be hauled into federal court, just as some were after the 1998 embassy bombings in Kenya and Tanzania? Should they be subjected to a trial by military officials? Or should they be taken before an international court, just as Slobodan Milosevic is standing trial for alleged war crimes in the former Yugoslavia?
NEWS
August 18, 1986
The U.S. decision not to participate in the World Court proceedings initiated by Nicaragua and subsequently sustained has left a blemish on our reputation as a leader of civilized and law-abiding nations. This country showed the importance it placed in international jurisprudence in 1946 when it was one of the few nations to agree to the compulsory jurisdiction of the International Court of Justice. The United States must have envisioned then that the tribunal would rule on more substantive issues than oil and fishing rights.
NEWS
July 20, 1998 | by David Eldredge and John Grant
Accusations of war crimes are mounting in the Kosovo region of Yugoslavia. At the same time, the United States is involved in monthlong negotiations to finalize plans for an International Criminal Court. The resulting treaty would be ratified by participating nations. The case in Kosovo, as well as elsewhere, should make it clear that there is a need for an international court. g1gues20DAVID ELDREDGEg2gues20JOHN GRANT One purpose of the ICC would be to try individuals accused of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes.
NEWS
July 2, 2011
Texas, ever fastidious in carrying out the death penalty, is close to letting its lethal fixation set a dangerous precedent for diplomatic relations. At issue is the case of a Mexican, Humberto Leal Garcia Jr., who in 1994 was convicted in Texas of the kidnapping, rape, and murder of a 16-year-old girl. His execution is scheduled for Thursday. Leal may very well be guilty and deserving of punishment. But his conviction is tainted because Texas neglected to inform him of his right under the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations to seek legal assistance from officials of his own country.
NEWS
July 2, 2012 | By Mike Corder, Associated Press
THE HAGUE, Netherlands - Ten years ago, the treaty that created the International Criminal Court came into force, creating the world's first permanent war-crimes tribunal. But as the anniversary is marked Sunday, allegations of state-sponsored atrocities in Syria are piling up and the court stands powerless to intervene, while the first person it indicted, Ugandan warlord Joseph Kony, is still at large and his brutal militia, the Lord's Resistance Army, continues its reign of terror.
NEWS
April 6, 1991 | By WILLIAM M. EVAN
Should a war crimes tribunal be convened so that Saddam Hussein and the members of his Revolutionary Command Council can be brought to justice? There is ample evidence that Hussein and his associates committed heinous crimes against the Kuwaiti people. And in launching their Scud missiles at Saudi and Israeli civilian populations, Hussein and his associates clearly violated the Hague and Geneva conventions on the laws of war. Likewise, there is growing evidence that U.S. prisoners of war were mistreated during interrogations - again in violation of the laws of war. A stringent United Nations Security Council resolution for a permanent cease-fire is clearly no substitute for the need to prosecute those guilty of war crimes.
NEWS
June 2, 2001
Regarding the repeated hints from Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld that the U.S. role in Bosnia may be over: The Dick Cheney-Rumsfeld axis has no use for the Balkans and feels that the United States did not have any real "job" in Bosnia to start with - so it's "done," whatever it may have been. On the other hand, Secretary of State Colin Powell, who soon may be the weakest secretary of state since William Rogers 30 years ago, uses multilateralism (including reiteration to NATO foreign ministers in Budapest that "we went in together, we'll get out together")
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NEWS
December 4, 2012 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
She was a guest of Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands, but it wasn't royal connections that landed Philadelphia lawyer Enid H. Adler at the Hague. It was her years of work in helping to create a forum where others might seek justice. Adler's life as a teacher, journalist, and advocate for people fleeing persecution drove her to help establish the International Criminal Court, founded in 2002 for the prosecution of war crimes across the globe. Adler, semiretired and battling cancer, traveled to the Netherlands to take part in the official ceremonies last month marking the 10th anniversary of a permanent, independent, international court.
NEWS
July 21, 2012
Court: Senegal must act on Habre DAKAR, Senegal - The United Nations' highest court on Friday ordered Senegal to prosecute or extradite former Chadian dictator Hissene Habre, who has lived in luxury in this seaside capital for more than two decades amid accusations that he ordered political opponents to be tortured or killed. A truth commission in the Central African nation of Chad has accused Habre of more than 40,000 political killings during his eight-year rule, and a court there already has sentenced him to death in absentia.
NEWS
July 3, 2012 | By Adel Omran, Associated Press
ZINTAN, Libya - Libya on Monday released four International Criminal Court staffers who had been held for nearly four weeks on allegations that they had shared documents that could harm national security with Moammar Gadhafi's imprisoned son, Seif al-Islam Gadhafi. As they were released, ICC President Sang-Hyun Song, a South Korean judge, apologized to the Libyan government and people for the incident and promised an investigation into the allegations. Song flew to Libya for the hand-over.
NEWS
July 2, 2012 | By Mike Corder, Associated Press
THE HAGUE, Netherlands - Ten years ago, the treaty that created the International Criminal Court came into force, creating the world's first permanent war-crimes tribunal. But as the anniversary is marked Sunday, allegations of state-sponsored atrocities in Syria are piling up and the court stands powerless to intervene, while the first person it indicted, Ugandan warlord Joseph Kony, is still at large and his brutal militia, the Lord's Resistance Army, continues its reign of terror.
NEWS
June 10, 2012 | By Toby Sterling, Associated Press
AMSTERDAM - The International Criminal Court on Saturday demanded the release of four of its staffers it says are being detained in Libya, where they are part of an official mission sent to meet with the imprisoned son of Moammar Gadhafi. "We are very concerned about the safety of our staff in the absence of any contact with them," said court President Sang-Hyun Song in a statement issued in the Hague, Netherlands. "These four international civil servants have immunity when on an official ICC mission.
NEWS
March 13, 2012 | By Mike Corder, Associated Press
THE HAGUE, Netherlands - Lawyers for Belgium urged the United Nations' highest court Monday to order Senegal to prosecute former Chad dictator Hissene Habre or extradite him for trial for allegedly masterminding atrocities during his brutal eight-year rule. Habre has lived in a luxury villa in Senegal's capital, Dakar, since rebels ousted him in 1990 and has become a symbol of Africa's inability to try leaders from the continent accused of rights abuses. The case at the International Court of Justice is about "taking a stand against impunity in the most serious crimes in international law," Belgian representative Paul Rietjens told judges in the wood-paneled Great Hall of Justice.
NEWS
July 2, 2011
Texas, ever fastidious in carrying out the death penalty, is close to letting its lethal fixation set a dangerous precedent for diplomatic relations. At issue is the case of a Mexican, Humberto Leal Garcia Jr., who in 1994 was convicted in Texas of the kidnapping, rape, and murder of a 16-year-old girl. His execution is scheduled for Thursday. Leal may very well be guilty and deserving of punishment. But his conviction is tainted because Texas neglected to inform him of his right under the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations to seek legal assistance from officials of his own country.
NEWS
November 7, 2006 | By Gwynne Dyer
Occasionally, like any doomed man, Saddam Hussein played with the notion of a last-minute reprieve. "He's told us many times that we won't be able to" avoid a death sentence in his trial, said Khalil al-Dulaimi, one of his lawyers, in June. "He knows that the sentence has been issued from Washington. " But at that point, he was still indulging in the fantasy that this was part of an American plan to restore him to power. "He'll be the last resort; they'll have to knock on his door," Dulaimi said.
NEWS
August 20, 2003
In a world beset by terrorism, some acts are so evil they can't be forgotten. Such an event happened on Dec. 21, 1988, when a bomb tore apart Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, as it journeyed toward New York. Dead were 259 passengers and crew, including 35 Syracuse University exchange students heading home for the holidays; 11 residents on the ground died instantly as pieces of the burning plane hit their homes. Last week - nearly 15 years after the bombing and more than two years after an international court held a Libyan guilty for it - Libya's government admitted responsibility and agreed to pay at least $5 million to each of the families of the 270 who died.
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