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International Franchise Association

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BUSINESS
July 7, 1997 | By Rosland Briggs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Linda Baker is an avid dollar-store shopper. Almost everybody she knows has "gotten caught up in" the stores, too. Recently, she decided she wanted to own one. Starting from scratch was not a consideration - not enough buying power to stock the store, she said. Buying into a franchise was the route she wanted to take. "There is a little comfort in knowing the parent company is behind you," said Baker, a Philadelphia resident who has training in cosmetology, home health care and paralegal work.
BUSINESS
May 25, 2013 | By Shobhana Chandra, Bloomberg News
Robert Rummells, a U.S. Army Ranger for 22 years, says it was a natural transition when he opened a Mosquito Joe pest-control franchise in Richmond, Va., earlier this month. "I'm an outdoor type of guy, and I didn't want to be chained to my computer in an office, talking on the phone," said Rummells, 49, who tried jobs such as installing equipment at a community college and simulating firearms training after retiring from the military in 2009. "I learned I needed to work for myself. " As more former service personnel turn to entrepreneurship, they're generating jobs that helped cut the unemployment rate for veterans to a four-year low of 6.2 percent in April, lower than the 6.9 percent rate for adult non-veterans.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2002 | By Porus P. Cooper INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Steven Rosen, a consultant in Blue Bell who has brought together buyers and sellers of franchised businesses for 14 years, can't recall being busier. The Web site for the International Franchise Association is recording visitors at twice the pace of two years ago. The number of inquiries to 7-Eleven about buying a franchise has grown to Big Gulp size. The economy looks bleak; the job market has stalled. For many, the time seems right to dream about becoming their own bosses, and a franchise is often the first thing that comes to mind because it tends to be a proven business.
NEWS
January 17, 1993 | By Jeff McGaw, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Mike Licciardi is his own boss. Sort of. He owns a franchise for a brake repair business, the Brake Shop, in Willow Grove. It's one of 70 such franchises across the nation. In exchange for the training he received on how to run the store and the use of the company name, he pays royalties to the Michigan-based parent company. That's the arrangement under which most people purchase franchises, said Kenneth P. Milner, chairman of the Montgomery County Bar Association's newly formed franchise-law committee.
BUSINESS
April 12, 1991 | by Jenice Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
After 10 years with Tandem Computers Inc., Walter J. Jarena was at a turning point: he could plan to relocate for a regional manager's job, or stagnate as district manager of the Cherry Hill office. Jarena chose neither, and opted totally out of corporate life. Last October, he opened his own MAACO body repair shop in Northeast Philadelphia. "I felt like I was starting to get limited," Jarena said. "I personally wasn't ready to (move). I thought the doors were starting to close in on me. " Jarena, 34, is one of thousands of former business executives who have either dropped out or been forced out of corporate life and have turned to franchising.
NEWS
May 10, 1990 | By Amanda Agee, Special to The Inquirer
Dreams were peddled at the Valley Forge Convention and Exhibition Center over the weekend. The exhibition center was the site of a franchising exposition with more than 85 franchisers, ranging from carwash services to hair salons, hoping to interest those who strolled by their booths in opening an outlet. "I think it's everybody's dream to be in business for themselves," said Norristown resident Mike Boures, a district sales manager for Pepsi-Cola Distributing Co. of the Delaware Valley and one of the thousands who visited the exposition Saturday and Sunday.
NEWS
February 21, 1991 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
Phyllis A. Scott has been named executive director of the Great Valley Regional Chamber of Commerce. Scott, of West Chester, formerly was a human resources executive for Mobil Oil Corp. and Citibank. She brings more than 25 years of managerial experience to her new position. Scott has received local and national recognition for her work in recruitment, outreach and development of minority and female talent, particularly in the fields of science and technology. She has lectured extensively to educators, corporate executives and parent groups on the workforce and workplace of the future, and other diversity issues.
BUSINESS
August 23, 1986 | By Peter Binzen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Irl H. Marshall is looking for people who want to clean up in the franchise business. Marshall and dozens of others like him are looking for those people today and tomorrow at the Wyndham Franklin Plaza Hotel, site of the "World of Franchising" show. But Marshall is looking for folks who really want to clean up. For initial outlays ranging from $13,800 to $25,000, Marshall's firm, Duraclean International of Deerfield, Ill., will help start interested parties in the franchise business of cleaning carpets, furniture and drapes.
BUSINESS
February 15, 1993 | By Larry Fish, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The thing that really got Roger Bassett interested in franchising his turkey-sandwich shop, he says, was the fact that "there are a lot of copycats out there. " He knew that he had a good concept at his stand in the Reading Terminal Market, selling roast-turkey sandwiches made to order, and that turkey was just about to catch a wave as a low-fat lunch alternative. He also knew that, long before he could accumulate enough capital to open a string of his own shops, some better-financed imitator would be likely to grab the market.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1994 | by Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer
Even as you read these words, there are folks down in Florida, coming off the beach, getting hotter and sweatier by the minute. Don't you think they'd find a cup of water ice refreshing? Bob Tumolo surely thinks so. After watching his company, Rita's Water Ice, grow to more than 20 stands in the Philadelphia region, he expects franchisees to open 24 Rita's in Florida this year. Since 1984, when Tumolo and his mother, Elizabeth, opened their first stand on a Bristol Pike front porch - naming it after Tumolo's wife, Rita - the family-run company has become synonymous with water ice in many parts of the Philadelphia area.
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BUSINESS
May 25, 2013 | By Shobhana Chandra, Bloomberg News
Robert Rummells, a U.S. Army Ranger for 22 years, says it was a natural transition when he opened a Mosquito Joe pest-control franchise in Richmond, Va., earlier this month. "I'm an outdoor type of guy, and I didn't want to be chained to my computer in an office, talking on the phone," said Rummells, 49, who tried jobs such as installing equipment at a community college and simulating firearms training after retiring from the military in 2009. "I learned I needed to work for myself. " As more former service personnel turn to entrepreneurship, they're generating jobs that helped cut the unemployment rate for veterans to a four-year low of 6.2 percent in April, lower than the 6.9 percent rate for adult non-veterans.
BUSINESS
September 4, 2012 | By Joyce M. Rosenberg, Associated Press
When Rick Kimsey decided to start a business, a franchise seemed the best way to go. Buying a Doctors Express urgent-care facility meant he didn't have to start from square one - he had a concept and a service to sell. Urgent-care centers treat common non-life-threatening medical conditions such as colds, broken bones, rashes, and stomach ailments, usually without an appointment. It didn't matter that Kimsey had no medical training. But what sounded like a great plan wasn't so easy.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2002 | By Porus P. Cooper INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Steven Rosen, a consultant in Blue Bell who has brought together buyers and sellers of franchised businesses for 14 years, can't recall being busier. The Web site for the International Franchise Association is recording visitors at twice the pace of two years ago. The number of inquiries to 7-Eleven about buying a franchise has grown to Big Gulp size. The economy looks bleak; the job market has stalled. For many, the time seems right to dream about becoming their own bosses, and a franchise is often the first thing that comes to mind because it tends to be a proven business.
BUSINESS
July 7, 1997 | By Rosland Briggs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Linda Baker is an avid dollar-store shopper. Almost everybody she knows has "gotten caught up in" the stores, too. Recently, she decided she wanted to own one. Starting from scratch was not a consideration - not enough buying power to stock the store, she said. Buying into a franchise was the route she wanted to take. "There is a little comfort in knowing the parent company is behind you," said Baker, a Philadelphia resident who has training in cosmetology, home health care and paralegal work.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1994 | by Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer
Even as you read these words, there are folks down in Florida, coming off the beach, getting hotter and sweatier by the minute. Don't you think they'd find a cup of water ice refreshing? Bob Tumolo surely thinks so. After watching his company, Rita's Water Ice, grow to more than 20 stands in the Philadelphia region, he expects franchisees to open 24 Rita's in Florida this year. Since 1984, when Tumolo and his mother, Elizabeth, opened their first stand on a Bristol Pike front porch - naming it after Tumolo's wife, Rita - the family-run company has become synonymous with water ice in many parts of the Philadelphia area.
BUSINESS
February 15, 1993 | By Larry Fish, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The thing that really got Roger Bassett interested in franchising his turkey-sandwich shop, he says, was the fact that "there are a lot of copycats out there. " He knew that he had a good concept at his stand in the Reading Terminal Market, selling roast-turkey sandwiches made to order, and that turkey was just about to catch a wave as a low-fat lunch alternative. He also knew that, long before he could accumulate enough capital to open a string of his own shops, some better-financed imitator would be likely to grab the market.
NEWS
January 17, 1993 | By Jeff McGaw, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Mike Licciardi is his own boss. Sort of. He owns a franchise for a brake repair business, the Brake Shop, in Willow Grove. It's one of 70 such franchises across the nation. In exchange for the training he received on how to run the store and the use of the company name, he pays royalties to the Michigan-based parent company. That's the arrangement under which most people purchase franchises, said Kenneth P. Milner, chairman of the Montgomery County Bar Association's newly formed franchise-law committee.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1992 | By Getsy M. Selirio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Through franchising, people like Charlotte Style of Bala Cynwyd have realized a dream: being their own boss. After raising two children, Style started working as a sales representative for a local eyewear company. Her income was dependent on every commission. So it wasn't exactly good news to hear in 1987 that her territory would be reduced. "They wanted to cut it into little pieces and give it to other agents," Style said. "I realized I didn't have a future. " Style did not want to be subject to the caprice of another employer.
NEWS
April 13, 1992 | By Maida Odom, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kathleen Farrar was a little taken aback by all the dark business suits and wondered whether her Peirce Junior College sweat shirt and Reeboks were appropriate. Then she remembered she was the customer - the people in suits were hoping to lure her. Out to buy a franchise, Farrar, 38, drove to the Washington Convention Center from her home in South Philadelphia on Friday, paid $15 admission and walked slowly through a maze of displays, elaborate exhibits and sophisticated hawkers at International Franchise Expo, a mammoth offering of opportunities and risks for a price.
BUSINESS
April 12, 1991 | by Jenice Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
After 10 years with Tandem Computers Inc., Walter J. Jarena was at a turning point: he could plan to relocate for a regional manager's job, or stagnate as district manager of the Cherry Hill office. Jarena chose neither, and opted totally out of corporate life. Last October, he opened his own MAACO body repair shop in Northeast Philadelphia. "I felt like I was starting to get limited," Jarena said. "I personally wasn't ready to (move). I thought the doors were starting to close in on me. " Jarena, 34, is one of thousands of former business executives who have either dropped out or been forced out of corporate life and have turned to franchising.
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