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International House

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NEWS
September 8, 2000 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
International House said yesterday it formed a partnership with TLA Video Entertainment Group to produce an expanded Philadelphia Festival of World Cinema. "By creating a partnership with TLA, we bring together two very strong and very different, and complementary organizations with different and complementary resources," said Ellen Davis, president of International House. "Together we can make the 2001 festival the most exciting festival ever for our 10th anniversary year. " Early in its history, she said, festival officials realized at some point a partner would be necessary.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1992 | By Anita Myette, Inquirer Staff Writer
Steel-drum king Terrence Cameron, backed by his sextet, the Steel Kings, will provide the music. Traditional West Indian food, such as curried goat, "jerk" chicken and rice and beans will be on sale. The event will take place in IH's Hopkinson Hall, at 37th and Chestnut Streets. Admission is $10. The fun begins at 8 p.m. To reserve tickets, call the Folklife Center at 215-895-6537 or TicketMaster at 215-336-2000.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1988 | By Kathy Hacker, Inquirer Staff Writer
If Hopkinson Hall were a high school gym, it might have ranked among the grandest in the city. As a theater, it had problems. Big problems. Because the hall at International House had a flat floor and no raised seating, audiences regularly had to abandon their chairs and dash for the aisles if they wanted to see a performer tap-dancing or clogging. Often they stood because the modular metal seats weren't designed for the posterior anatomy. "Sitting through a two-hour film or a concert," moaned spokeswoman Gail Bower, "was close to hell.
NEWS
November 17, 1990 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Ben Franklin was the starting image for The Driver's Son, the near-opera, near-movie by "Blue" Gene Tyranny performed last night at International House, in a program set in motion by the Electrical Matter. The author/composer noted that this was only a stop en route to the finished event, which will include video and computer components, themselves generated by the character of the vocal line. The text turns out to be the music, while the music - three pianos, two marimbas and some electronic additions - is an atmosphere through which the narrator-singer reports his position and presses the images of a ride through time and space.
NEWS
November 10, 1986 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
What's happening at International House, the unique arts and residence center devoted to international and intercultural understanding, is exciting, says Ellen Davis, its president. Exciting is a word Davis employs often in talking about the $3 million renewal of the 16-year-old building at 37th and Chestnut Streets, about the multipurpose theater that will be an important part of it, the expanded conference facilities, and the foundation grants that are making things possible.
BUSINESS
February 26, 1986 | By Andrew Cassel, Inquirer Staff Writer
International House today will become the first independent power producer in Philadelphia when officials of the 14-story student residence turn on their new cogeneration system at an afternoon ceremony. The manager of the 26-year-old building at 37th and Chestnut Streets hopes to save up to $230,000 a year in steam and electric bills with the new system, which was installed for just under $900,000. The inauguration of the system is a big boost for Philadelphia Gas Works, which will supply natural gas for the building's new boilers, and a loss for Philadelphia Electric Co., which will lose the building as a steam-heat customer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2015 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Amazing animal sculptures made from recycled material will be on display at the Philadelphia Zoo through Oct. 31. "Second Nature" features works by 12 artists from around the globe (including some from Philly) using recycled and repurposed materials, like a pink eight-foot crocodile made entirely of chewing gum. Philly artist Leo Sewell shows off his 175-pound rhinoceros sculpted from 250 silver serving trays collected from scrap piles, junk sales, and curbsides. Sculptures range from bunnies and gorillas to flowers made from a car hood.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2015 | A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
  When director/screenwriter Nefertite Nguvu appears at International House on Tuesday to screen and discuss her debut feature, In the Morning , she'll talk about sadness, laughter, love, and all the other everyday emotions portrayed in her visually and poetically arresting look at relationships among a group of black Brooklyn friends. That kind of normalcy, she contends, is missing from African American cinema. "In this increasingly vulgar climate of violence against us," Hollywood's penchant is to present black lives in the context of heroism, crime, or racial adversity, says the 38-year-old Nguvu.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2014 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
We live in the era of unlimited texting, Snapchats, direct messages, and LinkedIn connections. But Corey Carter believes we are everything but direct or connected. Verbal Connections, founded by Carter, is a conversation party, held every two months, that welcomes adults of all ages, ethnicities, and religious backgrounds to generate discourse on current events, relationships, and situation-ships. In 2011, Carter and his then-fiancée and now wife, Akilah Carter, held conversation parties in their living room.
FOOD
April 18, 2014 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
When chef Chip Roman was a lad and wanted things a touch on the fancy side, his grandmother would say, "Where do you think you are? The Tremont?" She pronounced the name of the erstwhile Lansdale landmark hotel TREE-mont - and that is what Roman has named his new Center City restaurant. The Treemont (231 S. 15th St., 267-687-2237) is a bilevel bistro in the Aria Condos. Roman (Blackfish, Mica, Ela, Tradestone Cafe, and Tradestone Confections) and business partner Victor Fellus revamped Fellus' short-lived Tietra, moving the staircase from the southern wall to the northern.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pornography became a chic topic this summer with the release of Lovelace , a biopic starring the brilliant young actress Amanda Seyfried as hard-core porn actress Linda Lovelace, who shot to fame in 1972's Deep Throat . Lovelace's film was so popular at the time that mainstream threaters did the unthinkable and began screening it. For good or ill, pornography was inextricably tied to the reshaping of America's sexual mores during the...
NEWS
November 1, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THE PHILADELPHIA Jewish Film Festival gets underway tomorrow, kicking off two weeks of internationally heralded movies and accompanying talent. Tomorrow's opening night movie is "God's Neighbors" (Gershman Y, 8 p.m.), an award-winner at the Cannes Film Festival, and praised in Variety as an "assured, provocative" look at young Hassidic men who enforce religious laws in their own neighborhood, until one falls for a woman who doesn't follow rules. Director Meni Yaesh will discuss the movie via Skype.
SPORTS
August 9, 2013 | BY MARK PERNER, Daily News Staff Writer pernerm@phillynews.com
ROY RUBIN, known more for his ineptness as the coach of the 1972-73 Sixers than for his superb coaching at Long Island University, died Monday in Florida at age 87, according to the LIU Brooklyn athletic website. Rubin came to the Sixers in 1972 with a reputation as a defensive genius, having written a book on the subject, and as one of the founding fathers of the Five Star Basketball Camp. But it quickly became apparent that Rubin was not cut out to be an NBA coach. The Sixers lost their first 15 games, on the way to a 4-47 mark by the All-Star break and a 9-win, all-time NBA-worst 73 losses.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2013
Friday The art of jazz Saxophonist Uri Gurvich , a rising star of Israel's jazz scene, performs as part of the Art After 5 series, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Great Stair Hall, 26th Street and the Parkway. Admission: $20; $18 seniors; $14 students; free 12 and under (includes museum admission and food). Time: 5:45 and 7:15 p.m. Information: 215-763-8100 or philamuseum.org.   Saturday A genuine place for poetry As Bryn Mawr grad Marianne Moore once wrote, poetry has "a place for the genuine.
NEWS
January 18, 2013
THE 1966 film "Daisies," directed by Vera Chytilova, created quite the stir with its vivid surrealist imagery, nonlinear plot and feminist message. The film follows two mischievous women, both named Marie, who repeatedly defy authority. Banned from theaters by the Communist party of the time, the film comes from a place of political turbulence. It's an anarchist statement that, in some ways, transmits the political attitude of the Czechoslovakian people in the late '60s. International House Philadelphia, 3701 Chestnut St., 7 p.m., Friday, $7-$9, 215-387-5125, ihousephilly.org.
NEWS
August 31, 2012
THE FEMALE FORM is one of art's oldest inspirations. Friday, International House opens an exhibit, "The Woman Represented," that examines the role of women as muse and showcases local artists who portray women in their work. "The exhibit was designed to highlight the diverse and fascinating story of the contemporary woman in America," said Reza Ghanad, the curator of the exhibit. Exhibitors include painters Jenn Warpole, Maria Maneos and Julia Clift. Ghanad said she "was specifically trying to highlight the talented ladies making great work here in Philadelphia.
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